Library

  • January 01, 2017
    FAO

    Strategic Work of FAO to Increase the Resilience of Livelihoods

    Together with its partners, FAO works to increase the resilience of agricultural livelihoods at risk of disasters and crises. People with resilient livelihoods are better able to withstand damage, recover and adapt when disasters cannot be avoided. The increasing frequency and intensity of disasters caused by climate change reinforces the urgency to build the resilience of agricultural livelihoods of vulnerable communities.

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    a​-i6463e.pdf (8 MB)
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  • January 01, 2017
    IGES

    Waste Management in Myanmar: Current Status, Key Challenges and Recommendations for National and City Waste Management Strategies

    This policy report reviews the current status of waste management in Myanmar and confirms that it remains at a preliminary stage, attributed to challenges at both the national and city levels resulting from a range of technical, social, economic and institutional constraints. Accordingly, the overall guidance of this report is the need for Myanmar to develop a national waste management strategy to serve as a principal framework for waste policies and practices across the country; such a strategy should be designed with a view towards supporting city-level strategies and actions, and focus on the piloting and execution of concrete actions led by Township and City Development Committees. In order to ensure that these national and city waste management strategies are implemented in a coordinated, cost-effective and efficient manner, the report concludes by providing a number of policy recommendations.

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    POLICY REPORT​_​_Myanmar.final​_.2017.01.31rev.pdf (7 MB)
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  • December 20, 2016
    WWF

    Myanmar's Electricity Vision

    This comprehensive study proves that renewable energy for Myanmar is not only technically feasible but also economically feasible compared to the so-called “cheap” traditional technologies. The development of Myanmar’s power sector will require multi-billion dollar investment over the next three decades and our analysis shows that a diverse mix of renewable energy, in combination with energy efficiency measures, will be the best solution for the sustainable power development of Myanmar.

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    myanmar​_s​_electricity​_vision​_final​_web.pdf (9 MB)
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  • December 20, 2016
    ADB

    Myanmar: Energy Assessment, Strategy, and Road Map

    This assessment highlights Myanmar’s energy sector performance, major development constraints, government plans, and future ADB support strategy.

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    mya​-energy​-sector​-assessment.pdf (2 MB)
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  • December 19, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary Lakes and Reservoirs: Status and Future Trends (Volume 2)

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  • December 15, 2016
    ADB

    Asian Economic Integration Report 2016

    With the continued anemic global economic recovery, trade growth in Asia and the Pacific decelerated in 2015, falling further behind growth in gross domestic product.

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    AsianEconomicIntegrationReport​-2016​-mainreport.pdf (4 MB) AsianEconomicIntegrationReport​-2016​-highlights.pdf (1 MB)
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  • December 07, 2016
    UNDP

    Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate: Strategy Note on Sustainable Energy

    UNDP's Energy Strategy, 2017-2021 

    UNDP’s Sustainable Energy Strategy Note, 2017-2021: Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate articulates – for the first time – UNDP’s vision, mission, approach, guiding principles, and focus in the area of sustainable energy. It also highlights the critical role that sustainable energy plays in advancing major outcomes from post-2015 global processes including the SDGs, the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the New Urban Agenda.

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    UNDP Energy Strategy 2017​-2021.pdf (3 MB)
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  • December 06, 2016
    UNDP

    BIOFIN Workbook: Mobilizing Resources for Biodiversity and Sustainable Development

    The 2016 BIOFIN Workbook was developed based on the inputs and lessons generated from BIOFIN implementation in 30 countries: Belize, Brazil, Botswana, Bhutan, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Fiji, Georgia, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, Mozambique, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam and Zambia.

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    BIOFINWorkbook2016.pdf (5 MB)
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  • December 01, 2016
    CIFOR

    CIFOR Strategy 2016-2025: Stepping up to the new climate and development agenda

    Since CIFOR last presented a 10-year strategy in 2008, we find ourselves in a world with continually evolving development and environment challenges. Millions of hectares of tropical forests have been converted to agriculture, degraded landscapes amount to nearly 2 billion hectares, and inequality has grown in countries around the world. Yet, there is reason to be optimistic: forest expansion and restoration are gaining ground, the rate of deforestation is slowing, and awareness of the importance of forests is spreading among governments, corporations and the global public.

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    CIFORStrategy2016.pdf (3 MB)
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  • December 01, 2016
    Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment

    Lao PDR National Agro-Biodiversity Programme and Action Plan II (2015-2025)

    The first National Agro-Biodiversity Programme, running from 2005 to 2012, was designed to serve as the framework for the effective conservation and management of agro-biodiversity. Although it was successful in raising awareness on agro-biodiversity and was instrumental in developing a number of projects designed to address agro-biodiversity issues, it had a number of shortcomings. Most importantly, there was a lack of a broad stakeholder involvement, resulting in inadequate GoL and donor funding support for the programme. There was also insufficient coordination and information exchange, particularly with focal points of international treaties and among the different technical components of the programme. Implementation arrangements were weak and became outdated with the creation of MoNRE and the reorganization of MAF.

    NABP​-II​_ENGLISH.pdf (1 MB)
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