Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

View Chart

Agriculture, value added (% of GDP)

View Chart

Annual rate of forest cover change

View Chart

Arable land as percentage of land area

View Chart

Fertilizer consumption

View Chart

Forest area

View Chart

Forest cover

View Chart

Freshwater fish production

View Chart

Marine fish production

View Chart

Percentage of agricultural land

View Chart

Permanent cropland as percentage of land area

View map

GMS Agriculture

View map

GMS Forest 2009

View map

GMS Rice Production

View map

GMS Soil Types

View map

GMS Topography

  • October 01, 2017
    FAO

    2017 Forest change in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS)

    Share link

    This report looks at both negative and positive drivers that affect forest change in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) in the last 25 years (1990-2015) in order to have a better understanding of their influence on forests in the region. It evaluates policies and measures in relation to drivers of forest change. Agricultural expansion, infrastructure development particularly hydropower dams and road construction, logging, mining operations and forest fires are the most dominant drivers of forest loss in GMS. At a positive note, almost all countries in the region have adopted policies that support SFM and balance the social, economic and environmental aspects of forestry. Furthermore, there seems to be a movement towards sustainable policies which influence the shift towards SFM, forest conservation and afforestation and reforestation. Although it seems the policies addressing the drivers of deforestation exist at local, national and international level, their effectiveness has been mixed. T his report presents forest changes in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) over a period of 25 years between 1990 and 2015. It describes key drivers that have affected these changes. Some drivers influenced forests negatively in that they resulted in deforestation and forest degradation. On the other hand, positive drivers promoted sustainable forest management (SFM), afforestation and reforestation and forest conservation.

    Click here for more detail.

    2017 FAO Forest Change in the GMS.pdf (4 MB)
  • September 07, 2017
    MRC

    Transboundary Water Resources Management Issues in the Sesan and Srepok River Basins of Cambodia and Viet Nam

    Share link

    This technical report describes priority issues for the management of water resources in the Sesan and Srepok River Basins along the borders of Cambodia and Viet Nam. Among key issues identified are insufficient monitoring and assessment of water flow, lack of flood forecasting and warning mechanisms, and limited mitigation measures to address the impacts of hydro-infrastructural development. This is a joint paper produced by the two countries under the Mekong Integrated Water Resources Management Project. 

    SESAN​-SREPOK​-Issue​-paper​-Final​-7​-Sep​-18.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 07, 2017
    MRC

    Transboundary Fisheries Management Issues in the Mekong and Sekong Rivers of Cambodia and Lao PDR

    Share link

    This technical report describes priority issues for fisheries management in the Mekong and Sekong Rivers along the borders of Cambodia and Lao PDR. It cites exploitative fishing practices, habitat degradation, and lack of fisheries data and their sharing between two countries’ affected provinces as some of the key issues identified. This is a joint paper produced by the two countries under the Mekong Integrated Water Resources Management Project. 

    MEKONG​-SEKONG​-issue​-paper​-Final​-7​-Sep​-17​-for​-web.pdf (3 MB)
  • August 01, 2017
    RECOFTC

    Moving from information dissemination to community participation in forest landscapes: How development organizations in Asia and the Pacific are using participatory development communication approaches

    Share link

    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused on the dissemination of technical information to end-users who were expected to adopt them. Development practitioners were trying to ‘push’ their products on communities in order to receive community commitment to their development initiatives. Further, when planning communication strategies, many projects tend to take a very broad problem as a starting point (a declining forest, for example) and then move right into planning communication activities (for example, information sessions, awareness campaigns). The result is that the target is often missed and despite all the activities undertaken the problem remains unaddressed. Participatory development communication (PDC) takes a different approach. It suggests a shift in focus from informing people with a view to changing their behaviours or attitudes to facilitating exchanges between various stakeholders. These exchanges help the stakeholders to address a common problem or implement a joint development initiative. PDC is a systematic process using participatory techniques and communication media (such as radio, newspapers, TV, social media) to empower communities to participate in the development process, enable them to take the lead on its activities and use the learning generated to improve their livelihoods. The purpose of PDC is to seek sustainable social change by engaging and empowering relevant stakeholders (FAO, 2014). At the heart of PDC and other participatory research and development approaches is people’s meaningful participation and empowerment. This paper offers a brief overview of the basic and practical steps involved in the PDC process to assist sustainable forest practitioners and communication officers to adopt a PDC approach in their work. The paper then reviews the PDC components of six case studies promoting sustainable forest management in Asia and the Pacific. Each project was conducted in 2015–16 and included a primary objective of influencing ‘community awareness and attitudes’ towards sustainable forest management. While the case studies do not offer examples of the complete PDC approach, they highlight how sustainable forest management projects in the Asia-Pacific region are moving away from one-way information dissemination toward using two-way communication approaches and tools to promote community participation in forest decision-making. The case studies were developed following a joint RECOFTC and FAO workshop on 12–15 May 2015 to improve the capacities of forestry communication officers from governments and NGOs to plan, develop and facilitate participatory development processes in building and implementing more effective communication strategies. Workshop participants are members of the Asia-Pacific Forest Communication Network (APFCN).

    Click here for more detial

    participatory​_development​_communcation​_case​_studies​_08​_2017​_en.pdf (5 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    ADB

    Financing Asian Irrigation: Choices Before Us

    Share link

    By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Improved irrigation productivity and greater financial sustainability are critical.

    Water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in the Asia Pacific region. By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Climate change and rapid population growth will place new pressures on already scarce water resources. Improved irrigation productivity—more crop per drop—and greater financial sustainability are critical. Estimates for the Asian region place a $12.31 billion annual investment required for irrigation between 2005 and 2013.

    This publication looks into how the Asia and Pacific region is addressing the need to sustainably fund large-scale, publicly owned and managed surface irrigation and drainage systems.

    financing​-asian​-immigration.pdf (2 MB)
  • April 01, 2017
    FAO

    Agroforestry in rice production landscapes in Southeast Asia: A practical manual

    Share link

    This publication represents an output of work conducted on trees outside forests (TOF) as part of Regional Rice Initiative (RRI) Phase 2. It provides practical information on the status, benefits and techniques related the use of TOF in rice production landscapes in Southeast Asia. The manual describes the main rice-based farming systems in Southeast Asia, discusses the potential of agroforestry in enhancing the livelihood of smallholder farmers in rice growing areas in Southeast Asia, and gives an overview of traditional and innovative practices integrating trees in rice-based farms and landscapes. The manual also provides practical information to guide the planning, design and management of agroforestry in rice production systems in Southeast Asia, including case studies from several countries in the region.

    a​-i7137e.pdf (5 MB)
  • February 15, 2017
    FiBL & IFOAM - ORGANICS INTERNATIONAL

    The World of Organic Agriculture 2017

    Share link

  • February 01, 2017
    RECOFTC

    Social forestry and climate change in the ASEAN region

    Share link

    This report is the third in a series of reports on the status of social forestry and its role in climate change mitigation and adaptation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. An initial baseline report was published in 2011 providing a regional overview for 2010 and the fist situational analysis was published in 2014, presenting the status in 2013. This analysis report, the second status update, presents the most up-to-date government data available on forests, social forestry and climate change at national and regional levels, and identifis key changes and developments during the last three years. The main focus of the report is the eight ASEAN countries with government-supported social forestry programmes, namely Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam.

    Click here for more detail.

    social​_forestry​_and​_climate​_change​_in​_the​_asean​_region​_2017​_01​_en.pdf (4 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    FAO

    FAO's strategic work to enable inclusive and efficient agricultural and food systems

    Share link

    FAO helps to build safe and efficient food systems that support smallholder agriculture. In order for developing countries to benefit from globalization and commercialization, FAO assists countries in building the capacity to access international markets, meeting international standards for food safety and hygiene and improving processes along entire value chains.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6627e.pdf (10 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    FAO

    Strategic work of FAO for Sustainable Food and Agriculture

    Share link

    FAO promotes the transition to sustainable and climate-resilient agricultural policies and governance mechanisms, working with countries on reviewing their policies and investment strategies and helping them align their policies and programmes in support of implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as the Paris Agreement on climate change.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6488e.pdf (9 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    CIFOR

    CIFOR Priorities 2017: Advancing research for forests and people

    Share link

    Aligned with CIFOR’s 2016-2025 Strategy, this document serves as a ‘road map’ to putting the strategy in practice through our impact-oriented research, capacity building, and outreach and engagement activities. Produced on a yearly basis and reviewed at CIFOR’s Annual Meeting, it aims to guide funding partners, implementing partners and staff on CIFOR’s current and future plans to meet the most pressing challenges of forest and landscape management around the world.

    Click here for more detail.

    PCIFOR1701.pdf (3 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    FAO

    Guide for planning, construction and maintenance of forest roads

    Share link

    The first part of the Manual introduces the main steps of forest road network planning and gives guidance on road construction under different site conditions. It demonstrates good practices to minimize the area used for building purposes, to keep the environmental impact as low as possible and to maintain forest productivity. It describes the machinery suitable for the different construction phases and compares the advantages of machine types. The second part of the Manual introduces the goals and best practices of regular forest road maintenance which is a key operation that enables multi-purpose use of forests. It gives an overview on the main causes of forest road degradation and explains the different maintenance regimes and maintenance activities.

    a​-i7051e.pdf (18 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    FAO

    State of the World's Forests 2016 - Forests and agriculture: land-use challenges and opportunities

    Share link

    Forests and trees support sustainable agriculture. They stabilize soils and climate, regulate water flows, give shade and shelter, and provide a habitat for pollinators and the natural predators of agricultural pests. They also contribute to the food security of hundreds of millions of people, for whom they are important sources of food, energy and income. Yet, agriculture remains the major driver of deforestation globally, and agricultural, forestry and land policies are often at odds. The State of the World’s Forests (SOFO) 2016 shows that it is possible to increase agricultural productivity and food security while halting or even reversing deforestation, highlighting the successful efforts of Costa Rica, Chile, the Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Tunisia and Viet Nam. Integrated land-use planning is the key to balancing land uses, underpinned by the right policy instruments to promote both sustainable forests and agriculture.

    SOFO2016​_FAO.pdf (5 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    CIFOR

    CIFOR Strategy 2016 – 2025: Stepping up to the new climate and development agenda

    Share link

    Since CIFOR last presented a 10-year strategy in 2008, we find ourselves in a world with continually evolving development and environment challenges. Millions of hectares of tropical forests have been converted to agriculture, degraded landscapes amount to nearly 2 billion hectares, and inequality has grown in countries around the world. Yet, there is reason to be optimistic: forest expansion and restoration are gaining ground, the rate of deforestation is slowing, and awareness of the importance of forests is spreading among governments, corporations and the global public.

    Click here for more detail.

    CIFORStrategy2016.pdf (3 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment

    Lao PDR National Agro-Biodiversity Programme and Action Plan II (2015 – 2025)

    Share link

    The first National Agro-Biodiversity Programme, running from 2005 to 2012, was designed to serve as the framework for the effective conservation and management of agro-biodiversity. Although it was successful in raising awareness on agro-biodiversity and was instrumental in developing a number of projects designed to address agro-biodiversity issues, it had a number of shortcomings. Most importantly, there was a lack of a broad stakeholder involvement, resulting in inadequate GoL and donor funding support for the programme. There was also insufficient coordination and information exchange, particularly with focal points of international treaties and among the different technical components of the programme. Implementation arrangements were weak and became outdated with the creation of MoNRE and the reorganization of MAF.

    NABP​-II​_ENGLISH.pdf (1 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    FAO

    The State of Food and Agriculture 2016 (SOFA): Climate change, agriculture and food security

    Share link

    The 2016 SOFA report presents evidence on today and tomorrow’s impact of climate change on agriculture and food systems. The report assesses the options to make agriculture and food systems resilient to climate change impacts, while minimizing environmental impacts. It shows that making agriculture and food systems sustainable is both economically and technically feasible. However barriers to the adoption of appropriate technologies and management practices will have to be lowered, especially for smallholder farmers and women farmers amongst them. Likewise, an overhaul is needed of agricultural and food policies to shift incentives in favour of investments, worldwide, in sustainable technologies and practices.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6030e​_3.pdf (6 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    Bioversity International

    Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity: Good Practices for Insitu and On-Farm Conservation

    Share link

    Farmers have developed a range of agricultural practices to sustainably use and maintain a wide diversity of crop species in many parts of the world. This book documents good practices innovated by farmers and collects key reviews on good practices from global experts, not only from the case study countries but also from Brazil, China and other parts of Asia and Latin America.

    A good practice for diversity is defined as a system, organization or process that, over time and space, maintains, enhances and creates crop genetic diversity, and ensures its availability to and from farmers and other users. Drawing on experiences from a UNEP-GEF project on "Conservation and Sustainable Use of Wild and Cultivated Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity for Promoting Livelihoods, Food Security and Ecosystem Services", with case studies from India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, the authors show how methods for identifying good practices are still evolving and challenges in scaling-up remain. They identify key principles effective as a strategy for mainstreaming good practice into development efforts. Few books draw principles and lessons learned from good practices. This book fills this gap by combining good practices from the research project on tropical fruit trees with chapters from external experts to broaden its scope and relevance.

    Tropical​_Fruit​_Tree​_Diversity.pdf (8 MB)
  • November 02, 2016
    UNDP

    Adaptive Farms, Resilient Tables: Building secure food systems and celebrating distinct culinary traditions in a world of climate uncertainty

    Share link

    As the world gets hotter and rainfall more erratic, the type and availability of ingredients for daily meals are changing. 

    With support from the Government of Canada and the Global Environment Facility’s Least Developed Countries Fund, the Canada-UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Facility (CCAF) has been supporting six least developed countries and small island developing states (Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Haiti, Mali, Niger and Sudan) to strengthen climate resilience and enhance food security. 

    Click here for more detail.

    CCAF​-Cookbook ​-FinalDraft​-29Oct.pdf (10 MB)
  • November 01, 2016
    World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

    Integrated systems research for sustainable smallholder agriculture in the Central Mekong

    Share link

    This book summarizes the achievements as well as some of the challenges faced while implementing integrated systems research to support the sustainable development of smallholder farming in the uplands of the Mekong region. It describes how CGIAR centres and national and local partners collaborated to test options to increase farm productivity in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam, and how field trials in Xishuangbanna, China; Son La, Viet Nam; and, Luang Prabang, Laos, showed that agroforestry and home-based vegetable gardens, among other interventions, could contribute to reduced land degradation and erosion. Efforts were also made to address the marginalization of ethnic minority farmers from agricultural and rural development. The book also discusses lessons learned in the research, including what did not work and possible reasons for that. Integrated systems research often requires ‘doing things differently’, which can lead to resistance among those involved. Also, implementing processes such as establishing and working together through multi-stakeholder platforms, was challenging and not always easy. However, some interesting new partnerships have emerged from this experience.

    Humidtropics​_Raneri.pdf (4 MB)
  • September 09, 2016
    Tropenbos International and EcoAgriculture Partners

    Guidelines-Participatory Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation of Multistakeholder Platforms in Integrated Landscape Initiatives

    Share link

    Integrated landscape initiatives often involve multi-stakeholder platforms. These are meant to enable discussions, negotiations and joint planning between stakeholders from various sectors in a given landscape. With growing investmentsn such platforms, there is a need for simple and affordable methods to aid their planning, monitoring and evaluation (PME). This report presents such a method, providing practical guidelines for participatory PME workshops based on three tools.

    Guidelines ​- Participatory Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation of Multistakeholder Platforms in Integrated Landscape Initiatives ​- 2016 Trobenos Int..pdf (2 MB)
  • August 12, 2016
    WWF-Cambodia

    Cambodia - The Supporting Forest and Biodiversity Project - Four Years of Achievement

    Share link

    Between 2012 and 2016, WWF-Cambodia implemented the Supporting Forests and Biodiversity (SFB) Project funded by USAID. This report overviews how the initiative improved the effectiveness of government and other key natural resource managers to sustainably manage forests in the Eastern Plains Landscape of Cambodia.

    sfb​_achievements​_layout​_version​_v​_2.pdf (3 MB)
  • August 10, 2016
    GMS Core Environment Program (CEP)

    Video: Safeguarding Yunnan's Biodiversity

    Share link

    This film highlights the environmental challenges facing China's Southwestern province of Yunnan as well as ongoing efforts to protect the unique biodiversity in the province's Xishuangbanna prefecture.

     

  • July 17, 2016
    UNEP

    Food Systems and Natural Resources

    Share link

    Food systems are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic global commitment to eradicate poverty and hunger while ensuring healthy, prosperous and fulfilling lives. The food we grow, produce, consume, trade, transport, store and sell is the essential connecting thread between people, prosperity, and planet. We therefore need ‘resource-smart’ food systems. Food systems crucially depend on natural resources: land, soil, water, terrestrial and marine biodiversity, minerals (essential nutrients for crops and animals) and fossil fuels. The use of these natural resources goes beyond primary food production, e.g. fresh water for processing and biomass for packaging or cooking. If we want ensure all people have safe and nutritious food, in appropriate amounts, these natural resources need to be managed sustainably and used efficiently, while reducing environmental impacts. The food sector is globally the dominant user of a number of natural resources, particularly land, biodiversity, fresh water, nitrogen and phosphorus. Food systems, and food production in particular, are also a major driver of a number of environmental impacts, such as the loss of biodiversity, soil degradation, water depletion and greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the people who directly or indirectly manage our food systems are also the largest group of natural resource managers in the world and could become critical agents of change in the transformation of current consumption and production systems.

    ​-Food​_systems​_and​_natural​_resources​-2016Food​_Systems​_and​_Natural​_Resources.pdf.pdf (9 MB)
  • June 01, 2016
    FAO

    Principles for the assessment of livestock impacts on biodiversity. Version 1

    Share link

    Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership

    The provision of guidance for the quantitative assessment of biodiversity in live¬stock and other sectors is an emerging area of work. This document represents an initial step in which international experts with various backgrounds shared their views on biodiversity assessment. The general objective of this document was to de-velop principles applicable to different assessment methods in order to guarantee a minimum level of soundness, transparency, scientific relevance, and completeness. These principles can be used to identify crucial elements of livestock systems that affect biodiversity, to monitor changes and make improvements, and to produce assessment results for internal or external communication.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6492e.pdf (6 MB)
  • May 18, 2016
    UNEP

    The Open Ocean: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 5)

    Share link

  • May 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    Community forestry-based climate change adaptation: A practitioner’s brief

    Share link

    In 2014, the USAID Climate Change Adaptation Project Preparation Facility for Asia and the Pacific(USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific ) teamed up with RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests to establish ademonstration site in the Bishnupur community of Sarlahi district of Nepal, on planning, financing andimplementing community forestry-based climate change adaptation (CF-CCA)

    community​_forestry​_climate​_change​_adapatation​_brief​_2016​_05​_en.pdf (1 MB)
  • May 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    Forests and climate change after Paris: An Asia-Pacific perspective

    Share link

    The 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was held in Paris, France, 30 November to 11 December 2015. COP 21 and the resulting Paris Agreement have been seen by many as a turning point in international climate negotiations. 

    forests​_and​_climate​_change​_after​_paris​_2016​_05​_en.pdf (4 MB)
  • April 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    Forest landscape restoration for Asia-Pacific forests

    Share link

    The Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) approach, which is still in its nascent stages of development, is rapidly gaining attention as a more appropriate way to restore both degraded forests as well as the surrounding degraded landscape. The great value of this approach is that it integrates forest restoration actions with the desirable objectives of the landscape, and it is undertaken with the full participation of the people who will have a role in the management of the restored areas over the longer term. So, FLR brings together social, environmental and economic considerations in restoring the forests and lands, converse to just restoring an isolated patch of forest without taking into consideration the people in the area. With people having no stake in the forest, the long-term success of the restoration work is not assured.

    forest​_landscape​_restoration​_for​_asia​-pacific​_forests​_2016​_04​_eng.pdf (3 MB)
  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary Aquifers and Groundwater Systems of Small Island Developing States: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 1)

    Share link

  • January 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    The role of community forestry in climate change adaptation in the ASEAN region

    Share link

    This paper summarizes key discussions from the 1st ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC) Learning Group workshop organized by RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests in August 2015. The discussions highlight a number of ways community forestry (CF) can support local communities in adapting to climate change.

    Click here for more detail.

    the​_role​_of​_cf​_in​_climate​_change​_adaptation​_in​_asean​_2015​_english.pdf (2 MB)
  • January 01, 2016
    FAO

    Towards the implementation of the SSF Guidelines in the Southeast Asia region

    Share link

    Following the endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) by the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in June 2014 and in line with paragraph 13.6 of the document itself, promoting the development regional plans of action for their implementation, a regional workshop was held in Southeast Asia to discuss implementation of the SSF Guidelines.

    The workshop was co-organized by the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) of the Republic of Indonesia and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) and the FAO Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) Project. Some 116participants attended the workshop representing governments, regional and international organizations, fisherfolk organizations, civil society organization, non-governmental organizations, academia and other relevant actors. The workshop acknowledged the importance of the SSF Guidelines for the Southeast Asia region and agreed on a number of priority action areas for inclusion in a regional plan of action to be developed with the support of SEAFDEC. National plans of action will also be promoted, and the workshop outcomes will be reflected in the implementation planning of the BOBLME Strategic Action Plan (SAP). FAO will continue to support these processes in collaboration with its partners with a view to securing sustainable small-scale fisheries and enhancing the sector’s contribution to food and nutrition security, poverty alleviation and natural resources management.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i5253e.pdf (3 MB)
  • December 01, 2015
    RECOFTC

    Improving incomes of local people through the sustainable harvesting of timber

    Share link

    This comprehensive report is a review of the ‘Strengthening Sustainable Forest Management and Bioenergy Markets to Promote Environmental Sustainability and to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Cambodia’ (SFM) project, summarizing the technical reports prepared by the individuals and organizations involved. The Community-Based Production Forestry (CBPF) Keo Seima project was conducted over several years and made possible by the invaluable contributions of many individuals of various organizations. Funding was provided by different sources interested in seeing through the success of the project.

    Improving incomes of local people through the sustainable harvesting of timberDec2015.pdf (1 MB)
  • May 01, 2015
    World Resources Institute

    Scaling up Regreening: Six Steps to Success

    Share link

    Scaling Up Regreening: Six Steps to Success highlights the benefits of “regreening” and its widespread adoption in Senegal, Burkina Faso, Niger, Mali, northern Ethiopia and Malawi, and identifies six steps to scale up regreening practices in Africa and beyond.

    scaling​-regreening​-six​-steps​-success.pdf (6 MB)
  • April 01, 2015
    ASEAN

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN

    Share link

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN (Rice, Maize and Cassava)

    The study on Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN.pdf (9 MB)
  • March 27, 2015
    FAO

    Developing an Environmental Monitoring System to Strengthen Fisheries and Aquaculture Resilience and Improve Early Warning in the Lower Mekong Basin

    Share link

    These proceedings report the result of a sub-regional consultation on the existence and effectiveness of environmental monitoring systems for fisheries and aquaculture in the Lower Mekong basin. The document also includes a baseline assessment of environmental monitoring systems in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, and the report of a regional workshop to discuss the assessments findings and future steps to improve an environmental monitoring and early warning system that will improve climate change adaptation in fisheries and aquaculture in the area.

    FAO​-Developing an Environmental Monitoring System.pdf (2 MB)
  • January 01, 2015
    CIAT, CGIAR, CCAFS

    Towards climate resilience in agriculture for Southeast Asia: An overview for decision-makers

    Share link

    This sourcebook, and accompanying poster learning series, is aimed at policy makers, planners in government, local research administrators, civil society partners and researchers in Southeast Asia. Compiled and repackaged by Dr. Julian Gonsalves and a resource team, the Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) source book draws from a rich pool of literature from over 700 sources. The compilation provides succinct, relevant and timely information about climate challenges, and potential solutions from previously published work in a simplified or a shortened form from around the world. While the focus is on challenges specific to Southeast Asia, solutions may come from, or already have been tested elsewhere; it is for this reason that articles from around the world have been included, to demonstrate that adaptation efforts are already being implemented, and a wide range of approaches and strategies are available. This resource seeks to bridge the gap between what policy makers know, and what research shows can work on the ground to improve adaptation, increase productivity, enhance livelihoods, and contribute to sustainable development affected by climate change. The related poster series can be found here: http://hdl.handle.net/10568/71099.

    Towards climate resilience in agriculture for Southeast Asia.pdf (18 MB)
  • September 23, 2014
    CIFOR

    Payments for Forest Environmental Services (PFES) in Viet Nam: Findings from Three Years of Implementation

    Share link

    This brief summarizes major achievements, challenges, and key recommendations from a review of Viet Nam’s payments for forest environmental services (PFES) program. Led by the Center for International Forestry Research and Viet Nam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, with support from the GMS Core Environment Program, the brief was developed as resource for a national PFES review workshop held in Hanoi on 17 September 2014.

    PFES in Vietnam.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 11, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    Scaling Up Payments for Forest Environmental Services in Viet Nam: Lessons and Insights from Quang Nam

    Share link

    This publication features ADB's support to the provincial authorities of Quang Nam in Viet Nam to scale up the implementation of payments for forest environmental services through a technical assistance financed by the Governments of Sweden and Norway. The project pilot-tested two innovations—the group approach and the use of a geographic information system—to speed up payments for forest environmental services planning and implementation in the province. Starting with five villages in Ma Cooih commune, the initiative expanded to include two more communes in the Song Bung 4 watershed. 

    scaling​-up​-payments​-forest​-environmental​-services​-vietnam.pdf (5 MB)
  • May 01, 2014
    RECOFTC

    Current status of Social Forestry in climate change adaptation and mitigation in ASEAN region

    Share link

    This report covers eight ASEAN countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia (particularly the state of Sabah), Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam). The report examines the current status of social forestry in climate mitigation and adaptation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and aims to update the Initial Baseline Assessment on Social Forestry and Climate Change published in 2010. Additionally, the paper seeks to facilitate information sharing within the region, and the continued development of policies and programmes through providing up-to-date information to all stakeholders. Covering eight countries in the ASEAN region, the research for the report was collected through desk-based research, reviews of national laws and policies, and technical reports.

    Click here for more detail.

    Situational Analysis Final web​_461.pdf (6 MB)
  • May 01, 2014
    Ministry of Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry

    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry Sectors 2014 – 2018

    Share link

    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry Sectors 2014 - 2018

    ccap​-agriculture​-forestry​-fisheries​-2014​-2018​-en​-final.pdf (25 MB)
  • April 25, 2014
    SANDEE

    Policy Brief: Operationalizing Environmental Economic National Accounts

    Share link

    This brief draws on the findings and key discussions from the 'Workshop on Valuing and Accounting for the Environment in Asia,' which was held in Bangkok 8-10 October, 2013. The brief was compiled by the South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics (SANDEE). The Core Environment Program provided funding support for the workshop.

    Operationalizing Environmental .pdf (383 KB)
  • April 01, 2014
    USAID, ICEM

    Mekong ARCC Climate Change Impact and Adaptation Study for the Lower Mekong Basin: Protected Areas Report

    Share link

    This protected areas report provides an outline of protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), and an overview of threats to PAs other than climate change, including land concessions, infrastructure development, illegal activities, and agriculture. The threats posed by climate change to PAs are then reviewed, followed by a series of case studies of climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, and adaptation options in four protected areas: 1) Nong Bong Kai Non Hunting Area – Thailand; 2) Nakai Nam Theun – Lao PDR; 3) Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary – Cambodia; and 4) U Minh Thuong National Park – Vietnam.

    Click here for more detail.

    mekong​_arcc​_theme​_report​_protected​-areas.pdf (2 MB)
  • January 29, 2014
    MDPI

    Carbon Stock Assessment Using Remote Sensing and Forest Inventory Data in Savannakhet, Lao PDR

    Share link

    Savannakhet Province, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), is a small area that is connected to Thailand, other areas of Lao PDR, and Vietnam via road No. 9. This province has been increasingly affected by carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted from the transport corridors that have been developed across the region. To determine the effect of the CO2 increases caused by deforestation and emissions, the total above-ground biomass (AGB) and carbon stocks for different land-cover types were assessed. This study estimated the AGB and carbon stocks (t/ha) of vegetation and soil using standard sampling techniques and allometric equations. Overall, 81 plots, each measuring 1600 m2, were established to represent samples from dry evergreen forest (DEF), mixed deciduous forest (MDF), dry dipterocarp forest (DDF), disturbed forest (DF), and paddy fields (PFi). In each plot, the diameter at breast height (DBH) and height (H) of the overstory trees were measured. Soil samples (composite n = 2) were collected at depths of 0–30 cm. Soil carbon was assessed using the soil depth, soil bulk density, and carbon content. Remote sensing (RS; Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) image) was used for land-cover classification and development of the AGB estimation model. The relationships between the AGB and RS data (e.g., single TM band, various vegetation indices (VIs), and elevation) were investigated using a multiple linear regression analysis. The results of the total carbon stock assessments from the ground data showed that the MDF site had the highest value, followed by the DEF, DDF, DF, and PFi sites. The RS data showed that the MDF site had the highest area coverage, followed by the DDF, PFi, DF, and DEF sites. The results indicated significant relationships between the AGB and RS data. The strongest correlation was found for the PFi site, followed by the MDF, DDF, DEF, and DF sites.

    remotesensing​-06​-05452.pdf (1 MB)
  • January 24, 2014
    UNEP

    Building Natural Capital: How REDD+ Can Support A Green Economy

    Share link

    REDD+ is the approach adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from forests. REDD+ stands for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, plus conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (UNFCCC, 2010). If systematically pursued, REDD+ would bring new momentum and new funding to the task of preserving the world’s forests. REDD+ is already delivering important outcomes as it brings further world attention to the conservation of tropical forests, monitoring the state of forests, and the contributions of people living in and around forests.

    building​_natural​_capital​_full​_report​_english.pdf (18 MB)
  • December 17, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB: Agriculture, Natural Resources and Environment Initial Sector Assessment, Strategy and Road Map for Myanmar

    Share link

    This sector assessment, strategy, and road map highlights the Government of Myanmar’s plans and strategies for addressing priority needs for the agriculture, natural resources, and environment sector and identifies possible preliminary areas of international assistance. It assesses key sector development needs by analyzing the strengths, constraints and weaknesses, various risks, and potential threats, as well as the opportunities, including further evolving the development partnership with the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

    ADB 2013 Myanmar Agriculture, Environment Assement.pdf (5 MB)
  • July 17, 2013
    Center for International Forestry Research

    Payments for Forest Environmental Services in Viet Nam - From Policy to Practice

    Share link

    This CIFOR Occasional Paper assesses the government of Vietnam’s program of Payments for Forest Environmental Services (PFES), with the aim of providing policy makers with practical policy recommendations for achieving effective, efficient and equitable outcomes. 

    Payments for Forest Environmental Services in Vietnam ​- From Policy to Practice.pdf (3 MB)
  • August 21, 2012
    Asian Development Bank

    Agricultural Trade Facilitation in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    Share link

    This ADB publication focuses on agriculture trade facilitation plan which lays out systematic ways to increase movement and flow of agri-food products and their impacts on the Greater Mekong Subregion sector.

    ADB agricultural​-trade​-facilitation​-gms.pdf (717 KB)