Biodiversity

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Annual rate of forest cover change

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Protected terrestrial areas as percentage of land area

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Environment Projects in GMS Landscapes

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GMS Conservation Landscapes

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GMS Ecoregions

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GMS Protected Areas

  • January 01, 2017
    Biodiversity International

    Creating mutual benefits: examples of gender and biodiversity outcomes from Bioversity International’s research

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    Bioversity International uses a gender lens to support the differentiated gender-specific knowledge and priorities linked to women’s and men’s access and management of resources. Women and men have different aspirations, skills and knowledge. The following pages comprise a series of fact sheets featuring Bioversity International case studies with local NGOs and partners. These case studies illustrate successful outcomes in gender and biodiversity through the use of gender-specific research methods.

    Creating​_GSICP.pdf (15 MB)
  • December 06, 2016
    UNDP

    BIOFIN Workbook: Mobilizing Resources for Biodiversity and Sustainable Development

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    The 2016 BIOFIN Workbook was developed based on the inputs and lessons generated from BIOFIN implementation in 30 countries: Belize, Brazil, Botswana, Bhutan, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Fiji, Georgia, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, Mozambique, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam and Zambia.

    Click here for more detail.

    BIOFINWorkbook2016.pdf (5 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment

    Lao PDR National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 2016 – 2025

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    National Biodiversity Strategies and Action Plans (NBSAPs) are the principal instruments for implementing the Convention at the national level (Article 6 above). The Lao PDR’s first National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP) laid out an action plan to 2010 and strategy to 2020, which consisted of seven programmes; (1) Scientific Data and Biodiversity Knowledge Development; (2) Biodiversity Management; (3) Human Resource Development Institutional; (4) Public Awareness and Involvement; (5) Institutional and Legal Frameworks; (6) NBSAP Implementation and (7) International Cooperation. Under those 7 programs, 27 objectives are to be achieved by 2020 and 203 actions were also identified which were to be undertaken by 2010.

    la​-nbsap​-v2​-en.pdf (2 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    Ministry of Natural Resources and the Environment

    Lao PDR National Agro-Biodiversity Programme and Action Plan II (2015 – 2025)

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    The first National Agro-Biodiversity Programme, running from 2005 to 2012, was designed to serve as the framework for the effective conservation and management of agro-biodiversity. Although it was successful in raising awareness on agro-biodiversity and was instrumental in developing a number of projects designed to address agro-biodiversity issues, it had a number of shortcomings. Most importantly, there was a lack of a broad stakeholder involvement, resulting in inadequate GoL and donor funding support for the programme. There was also insufficient coordination and information exchange, particularly with focal points of international treaties and among the different technical components of the programme. Implementation arrangements were weak and became outdated with the creation of MoNRE and the reorganization of MAF.

    NABP​-II​_ENGLISH.pdf (1 MB)
  • August 12, 2016
    WWF-Cambodia

    Cambodia - The Supporting Forest and Biodiversity Project - Four Years of Achievement

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    Between 2012 and 2016, WWF-Cambodia implemented the Supporting Forests and Biodiversity (SFB) Project funded by USAID. This report overviews how the initiative improved the effectiveness of government and other key natural resource managers to sustainably manage forests in the Eastern Plains Landscape of Cambodia.

    sfb​_achievements​_layout​_version​_v​_2.pdf (3 MB)
  • August 10, 2016
    GMS Core Environment Program (CEP)

    Video: Safeguarding Yunnan's Biodiversity

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    This film highlights the environmental challenges facing China's Southwestern province of Yunnan as well as ongoing efforts to protect the unique biodiversity in the province's Xishuangbanna prefecture.

     

  • August 01, 2016
    MEP, Government of China

    Technical Guidelines for Biodiversity Monitoring - Bees

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    The current standard is developed for the purpose of implementation of Environmental Protection Law of the People’s Republic of China and Law of the People’s Republic of China on the Protection of Wildlife and China Biodiversity Conservation Strategy and Action Plan (2011~2030) and standardizing biodiversity monitoring in our country. The current standard specifies main contents, technical requirements and methods for monitoring of the diversity of bees. Annexes A, B, C, D, E, F, and G of the current standard are informative annexes. The current standard is released for the first time.

    Technical guidelines for biodiversity monitoring—bees​_ChineseVersion.pdf (713 KB)
  • June 15, 2016
    WCS Cambodia

    Carbofuran poisoning at the interface between wildlife, livestock and humans.

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    Between January and August 2015, a series of animal mortality and human morbidity events in PreahVihear Province, were detected by the LACANET wildlife disease surveillance network. Initial findingsraised suspicions towards a link to pesticide use. Given the morbidity and mortality risks for humans,livestock, and endangered species, a thorough investigation was initiated. This document reports theresults of this investigation.

    This report was produced by the Wildlife Conservation Society with contribution from Dr MathieuPruvot (WCS), Alistair Mould (WCS), and Dr Mei Castor (US-CDC). Follow the link for more detial about WCS Cambodia.

    Carbofuran poisoning at the interface between wildlife, livestock and humans, June 2016.pdf (730 KB)
  • June 01, 2016
    FAO

    Principles for the assessment of livestock impacts on biodiversity. Version 1

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    Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership

    The provision of guidance for the quantitative assessment of biodiversity in live¬stock and other sectors is an emerging area of work. This document represents an initial step in which international experts with various backgrounds shared their views on biodiversity assessment. The general objective of this document was to de-velop principles applicable to different assessment methods in order to guarantee a minimum level of soundness, transparency, scientific relevance, and completeness. These principles can be used to identify crucial elements of livestock systems that affect biodiversity, to monitor changes and make improvements, and to produce assessment results for internal or external communication.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6492e.pdf (6 MB)
  • March 23, 2016
    IUCN

    A global standard for the identification of Key Biodiversity Areas

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    The Global Standard for the Identification of Key Biodiversity Areas (IUCN 2016) sets out globally agreed criteria for the identification of KBAs worldwide. The KBA Standard establishes a consultative, science-based process for KBA identification, founded on the consistent application of global criteria with quantitative thresholds that have been developed through an extensive consultation exercise spanning several years.

    Sites qualify as global KBAs if they meet one or more of 11 criteria, clustered into five categories: threatened biodiversity; geographically restricted biodiversity; ecological integrity; biological processes; and, irreplaceability. The KBA criteria can be applied to species and ecosystems in terrestrial, inland water and marine environments. Although not all KBA criteria may be relevant to all elements of biodiversity, the thresholds associated with each of the criteria may be applied across all taxonomic groups (other than micro-organisms) and ecosystems.

    Click here for more detial.

    2016​-048.pdf (701 KB)
  • April 01, 2014
    USAID, ICEM

    Mekong ARCC Climate Change Impact and Adaptation Study for the Lower Mekong Basin: Protected Areas Report

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    This protected areas report provides an outline of protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), and an overview of threats to PAs other than climate change, including land concessions, infrastructure development, illegal activities, and agriculture. The threats posed by climate change to PAs are then reviewed, followed by a series of case studies of climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, and adaptation options in four protected areas: 1) Nong Bong Kai Non Hunting Area – Thailand; 2) Nakai Nam Theun – Lao PDR; 3) Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary – Cambodia; and 4) U Minh Thuong National Park – Vietnam.

    Click here for more detail.

    mekong​_arcc​_theme​_report​_protected​-areas.pdf (2 MB)
  • June 01, 2012
    UNEP

    Promoting Upstream-downstream Linkages Through Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Greater Mekong Subregion (UNEP Policy Series)

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    In the context of supporting biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and poverty reduction, this policy paper portrays the critical role that ecosystem management and ecosystem services can play in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). Ecosystem management is"an integrated process to conserve and improve ecosystem health that sustains ecosystem services for human well-being" (UNEP, 2009). The IUCN defines it as "a process that integrates ecological, socio-economic, and institutional factors into comprehensive analysis and action in order to sustain and enhance the quality of the ecosystems to meet current and future needs" (IUCN, 2011). Ecosystem management embraces an interdisciplinary approach that highlights connections between ecological, social-cultural, economic and institutional structures. Underlying the approach is the explicit goal to sustain ecosystem composition, structure, and function while providing for human needs (Grumbine, 1994, Layzer, 2008). Critical to this is ongoing research and monitoring of ecological interactions and processes, and a collaborative, adaptive approach.

    PB12252.pdf (5 MB)