Energy

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CO2 emissions from energy

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CO2 emissions per capita

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Electricity consumption

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Electricity consumption per capita

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Energy intensity

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Final energy consumption

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Primary energy production

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GMS Crossborder Power Transmission

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GMS Dams

  • December 01, 2017
    GGGI

    Green Energy Development Technical Guidelines 4th

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    GGGI’s Technical Guidelines on Green Energy Development, the 4th in the series of GGGI Technical Guidelines, published by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). GGGI developed this Green Energy Development Guidelines based on its experience in providing green growth and energy support to member countries.

    The Guidelines are developed to assist member countries in developing strategic green energy development plans and implementation road maps at every stage of the GGGI value chain. They serve as reference for government officials of GGGI member countries, GGGI staffs and consultants, development partners, and relevant stakeholders who are working on areas related to or looking to develop a project on green energy.

    GGGI’s​-Technical​-Guidelines​-on​-Green​-Energy​-Development​_dereje​-senshaw2017.pdf (2 MB)
  • November 01, 2017
    International Energy Agency

    Technology Roadmap: Delivering Sustainable Bioenergy

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    Bioenergy is the main source of renewable energy today. IEA modelling also indicates that modern bioenergy is an essential component of the future low carbon global energy system if global climate change commitments are to be met, playing a particularly important role in helping to decarbonise sectors such as aviation, shipping and long haul road transport. However, the current rate of bioenergy deployment is well below the levels required in low carbon scenarios. Accelerated deployment is urgently needed to ramp up the contribution of sustainable bioenergy across all sectors, notably in the transport sector where consumption is required to triple by 2030.  But bioenergy is a complex and sometimes controversial topic. There is an increasing understanding that only bioenergy that is supplied and used in a sustainable manner has a place in a low carbon energy future.  This Technology Roadmap re-examines the role of bioenergy in light of changes to the energy landscape over the past five years as well as recent experience in bioenergy policy, market development and regulation. It identifies the technical, policy and financial barriers to deployment, and suggests a range of solutions to overcome them.

    Technology​_Roadmap​_Delivering​_Sustainable​_Bioenergy.pdf (2 MB)
  • October 18, 2017
    China National Renewable Energy Centre

    China Renewable Energy Outlook 2017 - Executive Summary

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    China Renewable Energy Outlook 2017 (CREO 2017) is the second outlook in the “Boosting Renewable Energy in China” program within China National Renewable Energy Centre (CNREC). Against the backdrop of overarching Chinese development strategies and the international experiences from front-runner countries this year’s outlook focuses on China’s possibilities for low-carbon energy transition towards 2050, and the short-term actions needed to remove obstacles for RE development and quickly move in the right direction. The results of our research are presented in the outlook report, which will be published in November 2017. In this booklet, we present the main findings and key results to give the reader a quick overview. For the more detailed assumptions, analyses and results we strongly recommend reading the full report.

    CREO​_2017​-booklet​-EN​-20171222.pdf (2 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    ADB

    Improving Lives of Rural Communities Through Developing Small Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems

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    Case studies highlight experiences of six pilot projects on the development of small hybrid renewable energy systems in Asian rural areas and small isolated islands.

    Despite significant economic growth in Asia in recent decades, millions of people in rural Asia still lack access to electricity. A project has been implemented to develop small hybrid renewable energy systems in these areas. 

    This publication highlights the experiences of these pilot projects in five developing member countries. It provides technical guidance and recommendations for the deployment of similar systems in minigrids in remote rural locations and small isolated islands to achieve access to electricity and energy efficiency.

    Click here for more detial.

    improving​-lives​-rural​-communities​-renewable​-energy.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    ADB

    Myanmar Energy Consumption Surveys

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    Results of household energy consumption surveys conducted in 2014 provide a more accurate picture of historical energy consumption in Myanmar by fuel source.

    Myanmar has one of the fastest growing economies in Asia, yet its potential is severely constrained by limited energy infrastructure. The limited availability of modern energy services and infrastructure has resulted in Myanmar having one of the lowest per capita energy consumption rates in the world.

    A household energy consumption survey in 11 regions across Myanmar shows that firewood is mainly used for cooking (73%) and candles and torches for lighting (65%), followed by electricity for cooking (13%) and battery for lighting (17%) while the demand for modern energy sources is rapidly increasing. This report presents the results of household energy consumption surveys conducted in 2014 that helped develop a more accurate picture of historical energy consumption by fuel source. This publication shares the survey results, considering the scarcity of available energy data and statistics in Myanmar especially at the household level. The data herein may prove useful in making more informed decisions by those involved in Myanmar’s energy and social sectors.

    Click here for more detial.

    myanmar​-energy​-consumption​-surveys.pdf (3 MB)
  • June 30, 2017
    the Stimson Center’s Southeast Asia

    Mekong Power Shift: Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector

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  • April 06, 2017
    Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre

    Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2017

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  • April 01, 2017
    ADB

    Clean Energy Financing Partnership Facility: Annual Report 2016

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    ADB's Clean Energy Financing Partnership continues to provide critical financial support to clean energy projects with $2.1 billion in clean energy investments in 2016.

    The Clean Energy Financing Partnership Facility (CEFPF) was established by ADB in April 2007, to assist developing member countries improve energy security and transit to low-carbon use through cost-effective investments, particularly in technologies that result in greenhouse gas mitigation. CEFPF is composed of the Clean Energy Fund, the Asian Clean Energy Fund, the Carbon Capture and Storage Fund and the Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in Asia. The Facility contributes to the energy sector in achieving the scaled up ADB’s annual target set in September 2015, ADB pledged to double its annual climate financing to $6 billion by 2020, with $4 billion for climate mitigation and $2 billion for climate adaptation. The energy sector is expected to contribute about $3 billion to climate mitigation.

    This annual report provides CEFPF's operational results and overall implementation progress from 1 January to 31 December 2016.

    cefpf​-annual​-report​-2016.pdf (3 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    ADB

    Energy Storage in Grids with High Penetration of Variable Generation

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    With increased emphasis on reducing emissions from the power sector, grid-level energy storage can enable larger penetration of renewable energy into the grid.

    Grid-level energy storage is likely to dominate the conversation in the power industry in the coming years, just like renewable energy dominated the conversation in the past 2 decades. This report targets investors, developers, utility planners, power sector policy makers, and readers who wish to understand the role energy storage is likely to play in the smart grid of the future. For developing countries, the report provides an introduction to the necessary technical background on energy storage, the role it is likely to play as penetration of renewable energy increases in the grid, and the policy prescriptions to realize the wide range of benefits of energy storage.

    Click here for more detail.

    energy​-storage​-grids.pdf (768 KB)
  • December 20, 2016
    ADB

    Myanmar: Energy Assessment, Strategy and Road Map

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    This assessment highlights Myanmar’s energy sector performance, major development constraints, government plans, and future ADB support strategy.

    Click here for detial report.

    mya​-energy​-sector​-assessment.pdf (2 MB)
  • December 20, 2016
    WWF

    Myanmar's Electricity Vision

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    This comprehensive study proves that renewable energy for Myanmar is not only technically feasible but also economically feasible compared to the so-called “cheap” traditional technologies. The development of Myanmar’s power sector will require multi-billion dollar investment over the next three decades and our analysis shows that a diverse mix of renewable energy, in combination with energy efficiency measures, will be the best solution for the sustainable power development of Myanmar.

    Click here for more detail.

    myanmar​_s​_electricity​_vision​_final​_web.pdf (9 MB)
  • December 07, 2016
    UNDP

    Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate: Strategy Note on Sustainable Energy

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    UNDP's Energy Strategy, 2017-2021 

    UNDP’s Sustainable Energy Strategy Note, 2017-2021: Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate articulates – for the first time – UNDP’s vision, mission, approach, guiding principles, and focus in the area of sustainable energy. It also highlights the critical role that sustainable energy plays in advancing major outcomes from post-2015 global processes including the SDGs, the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the New Urban Agenda.

    Click here for more detail.

    UNDP Energy Strategy 2017​-2021.pdf (3 MB)
  • June 01, 2016
    International Energy Agency

    Next Generation Wind and Solar Power

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    Wind and solar photovoltaics (PV) are currently the fastest-growing sources of electricity globally. A "next generation" phase of deployment is emerging, in which wind and solar PV are technologically mature and economically affordable.

    The success of variable renewable energy (VRE) is also bringing new challenges to the fore. Electricity generation from both technologies is constrained by the varying availability of wind and sunshine. This can make it difficult to maintain the necessary balance between electricity supply and consumption at all times.

    As these variable renewables enter this next generation of deployment, the issue of system and market integration becomes a critical priority for renewables policy and energy policy more broadly. The paper highlights that this will require strategic action in three areas:

    - System-friendly deployment, aiming to maximise the net benefit of wind and solar power for the entire system
    - Improved operating strategies, such as advanced renewable energy forecasting and enhanced scheduling of power plants
    - Investment in additional flexible resources, comprising demand-side resources, electricity storage, grid infrastructure and flexible generation

    In addition, the paper argues that unlocking the contribution of system-friendly deployment calls for a paradigm shift in the economic assessment of wind and solar power. The traditional focus on the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) – a measure of cost for a particular generating technology at the level of a power plant – is no longer sufficient. Next-generation approaches need to factor in the system value of electricity from wind and solar power – the overall benefit arising from the addition of a wind or solar power generation source to the power system. System value is determined by the interplay of positives and negatives including reduced fuel costs, reduced carbon dioxide and other pollutant emissions costs, or higher costs of additional grid infrastructure.

    In addition to general analysis and recommendations, the paper also includes summaries of three case studies in China, Denmark and South Africa.

    NextGenerationWindandSolarPower.pdf (2 MB)
  • November 30, 2015
    UNEP

    Green Energy Choices: The benefits, risks and trade-offs of low-carbon technologies for electricity production

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    Faced with an expected doubling in world demand for energy by 2050, massive investment will be needed to develop and install systems that can not only meet the energy needs of nine billion people but at the same time reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollution, toxicity, the impacts on land, water and other eco-systems. This investment need presents the perfect opportunity to select the best electricity generation technologies to meet these aims (Chapter 1). This report consists of this Technical Summary, and ten chapters constituting the full report. It identifies important environmental characteristics of low-carbon electricity generation technologies and provides decision makers with essential information on these characteristics. It assesses the impacts of building, operating and dismantling renewable power generation technologies such as hydropower, wind power, photovoltaics, and concentrated solar power on human health, ecosystems and natural resources. It also assesses the impacts of coal- and gas-fired power with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The impacts of these technologies are compared with those of modern coal and gas-fired power without CCS, but with state-of-the-art pollution control.

    ​-green​_energy​_choices​_full​_report​_english.pdf (41 MB)
  • July 24, 2015
    Asian Development Bank

    Renewable Energy Developments and Potential for the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This ADB report was produced under the technical assistance project Promoting Renewable Energy, CleanFuels, and Energy Efficiency in the Greater Mekong Subregion (TA 7679). It focused on renewable energydevelopments and potential in five countries in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS): Cambodia, theLao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam. It assessed the potential of solar,wind, biomass, and biogas as sources of renewable energy. Technical considerations include the degree andintensity of solar irradiation, average wind speeds, backup capacity of grid systems, availability and quality ofagricultural land for biofuel crops, and animal manure concentrations for biogas digester systems. Most GMSgovernments have established plans for reaching these targets and have implemented policy, regulatory, andprogram measures to boost solar, wind, biomass, and biogas forms of renewable energy. Incentives for privatesector investment in renewable energy are increasingly emphasized.

    renewable​-energy​-developments​-gms.pdf (6 MB)
  • February 06, 2015
    MRC

    Don Sahong Hydropower Project

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    The Mekong River Commission (MRC) is carrying out prior consultation for the Don Sahong Hydropower project to discuss and evaluate benefits and associated risks of the project which may have significant impacts on the environment and people in the Lower Mekong Basin. The Don Sahong Hydropower Project will produce 260 megawatts of electricity and will be situated in one of the braided channels in the Mekong River’s Siphandone area of Southern Lao PDR.

    Click here for detail report.


    Technical​-Review​-Report​-DSHPP​-040315.pdf (1 MB)
  • January 01, 2015
    Ministry of Mines and Energy

    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Mines and Energy Sectors 2015 – 2018

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    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Mines and Energy Sectors 2015 - 2018

    13. ccap​-mines and energy​-2015​-2018​-en​-final.pdf (20 MB)
  • June 24, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB Environmental Issues, Climate Changes, and Energy Security in Developing Asia

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    This paper examines four environmental dimensions of energy security—climate change, air pollution, water availability and quality, and land-use change—and the environmental impact of various energy systems. Since all energy sources have an environmental impact, policymakers must begin to incorporate the cost of these negative consequences into energy prices.

    Environmental Issues, Climate Changes, and Energy Security in Developing Asia.pdf (208 KB)
  • June 11, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB Clean Energy Investments Project Summaries

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    This report summarizes the investments in clean energy made by the operations departments of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in 2013, condensing information from project databases and formal reports in an easy-to-reference format. This report was prepared by ADB’s Clean Energy Program which provides the cohesive agenda that encompasses and guides ADB’s lending and non-lending assistance, initiatives, and plan of action for sustainable growth in Asia and the Pacific.

    clean​-energy​-investment​-2014​_1.pdf (6 MB)
  • November 01, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    Energy Outlook for Asia and the Pacific

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    This ADB book provides an energy outlook for the region up to the year 2035 to help identify policy, social, infrastructure, and technology issues that must be addressed to meet future energy needs of ADB members in Asia and the Pacific. 

    ADB energy outlook in Asia.pdf (2 MB)