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  • Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2017

    The Key Indicators presents the latest statistics on a comprehensive set of economic, financial, social, environmental,

    The Key Indicators presents the latest statistics on a comprehensive set of economic, financial, social, environmental, and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators for the 48 regional members of the Asian Development Bank. It is designed to serve as a resource for information on development issues across the region for a wide audience, including policy makers, development practitioners, government officials, researchers, students, and the general public.

    A key component of this year’s report is a summary of findings from three pilot household surveys to support the development of standardized methods and guidelines for collecting sex-disaggregated data on asset ownership.

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    key​-indicators​-2017.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Moving from information dissemination to community participation in forest landscapes: How development organizations in Asia and the Pacific are using participatory development communication approaches

    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused o

    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused on the dissemination of technical information to end-users who were expected to adopt them. Development practitioners were trying to ‘push’ their products on communities in order to receive community commitment to their development initiatives. Further, when planning communication strategies, many projects tend to take a very broad problem as a starting point (a declining forest, for example) and then move right into planning communication activities (for example, information sessions, awareness campaigns). The result is that the target is often missed and despite all the activities undertaken the problem remains unaddressed. Participatory development communication (PDC) takes a different approach. It suggests a shift in focus from informing people with a view to changing their behaviours or attitudes to facilitating exchanges between various stakeholders. These exchanges help the stakeholders to address a common problem or implement a joint development initiative. PDC is a systematic process using participatory techniques and communication media (such as radio, newspapers, TV, social media) to empower communities to participate in the development process, enable them to take the lead on its activities and use the learning generated to improve their livelihoods. The purpose of PDC is to seek sustainable social change by engaging and empowering relevant stakeholders (FAO, 2014). At the heart of PDC and other participatory research and development approaches is people’s meaningful participation and empowerment. This paper offers a brief overview of the basic and practical steps involved in the PDC process to assist sustainable forest practitioners and communication officers to adopt a PDC approach in their work. The paper then reviews the PDC components of six case studies promoting sustainable forest management in Asia and the Pacific. Each project was conducted in 2015–16 and included a primary objective of influencing ‘community awareness and attitudes’ towards sustainable forest management. While the case studies do not offer examples of the complete PDC approach, they highlight how sustainable forest management projects in the Asia-Pacific region are moving away from one-way information dissemination toward using two-way communication approaches and tools to promote community participation in forest decision-making. The case studies were developed following a joint RECOFTC and FAO workshop on 12–15 May 2015 to improve the capacities of forestry communication officers from governments and NGOs to plan, develop and facilitate participatory development processes in building and implementing more effective communication strategies. Workshop participants are members of the Asia-Pacific Forest Communication Network (APFCN).

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    participatory​_development​_communcation​_case​_studies​_08​_2017​_en.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Mekong Power Shift: Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector

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  • Lessons from ADB Transport Projects: Moving Goods, Connecting People, and Disseminating Knowledge

    From in-country to cross-country connections, whether by land, air, or water, transport is a key ingredient that en

    From in-country to cross-country connections, whether by land, air, or water, transport is a key ingredient that enables nations to achieve economic and social development goals.

    ADB has been working with developing member countries to improve roads, airports, waterways, and other transport infrastructures to provide people with better access to economic opportunities, public services, domestic and international markets. This publication shares 20 case stories bearing practical knowledge and lessons for transport projects across Asia and the Pacific region under different socioeconomic and political situations.

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    lessons​-transport​-projects.pdf (8 MB)
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  • Business for Sustainable Landscapes

    This report draws widely from the diverse experience of landscape partnerships to analyze the challenges and opportuniti

    This report draws widely from the diverse experience of landscape partnerships to analyze the challenges and opportunities for businesses and their partners, and lays out critical actions needed by businesses themselves, and by financial institutions, governments and landscape programs, to improve the effectiveness of landscape partnerships and replicate the approach in many more places.

    Business​-for​-Sustainable​-Landscapes​-An​-Action​-Agenda​-for​-Sustainable​-Development​-May​-2017.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific: 50 Years of The Asian Development Bank

    This book is a history of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a multilateral development bank established 50 years ago to

    This book is a history of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a multilateral development bank established 50 years ago to serve Asia and the Pacific.

    Focusing on the region’s economic development, the evolution of the international development agenda, and the story of ADB itself, Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific raises several key questions: What are the outstanding features of regional development to which ADB had to respond? How has the bank grown and evolved in changing circumstances? How did ADB’s successive leaders promote reforms while preserving continuity with the efforts of their predecessors? ADB has played an important role in the transformation of Asia and the Pacific over the past 50 years. As ADB continues to evolve and adapt to the region’s changing development landscape, the experiences highlighted in this book can provide valuable insight on how best to serve Asia and the Pacific in the future.

    50years​-adb.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2017: Transcending the Middle-Income Challenge

    Developing Asia has continued to perform well, even as recovery in the major industrial economies remains weak. The regi

    Developing Asia has continued to perform well, even as recovery in the major industrial economies remains weak. The region is forecast to expand by 5.7% in 2017 and 2018, nearly the 5.8% growth achieved in 2016.

    Decades of rapid growth transformed developing Asia from a low-income region to middle income. Sustaining growth to power the transition to high income will depend on much greater improvement in productivity. Innovation, human capital, and infrastructure are the three pillars of productivity growth. Supportive institutions and policies, underpinned by macroeconomic stability, can strengthen all three pillars. Asia’s dynamic track record suggests that attaining high income status, while challenging, is achievable.

    ado​-2017.pdf (7 MB)
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  • Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity

    In Asia and the Pacific extreme income poverty remains widespread. This analysis of trends and highlighted good practice

    In Asia and the Pacific extreme income poverty remains widespread. This analysis of trends and highlighted good practices provides useful input into regional and global dialogues.

    This report is produced under a renewed partnership between United Nations (ESCAP), ADB, and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to support national and regional efforts to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It explores five megatrends that will determine whether everyone will be able to thrive and fulfill their expectations for a better life in the future: regional economic cooperation and integration; rural–urban transitions; demographic changes; ICT access and connectivity; and demand for natural resources.

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    eradicating​-poverty​-asia​-pacific.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Resource Efficiency: Potential and Economic Implications

    As our population continues to grow, so does the pressure on our finite and fragile resources. Yet that threat can be tu

    As our population continues to grow, so does the pressure on our finite and fragile resources. Yet that threat can be turned into an opportunity to deliver the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the massive potential of using increased efficiency as a costeffective way to protect resources, tackle climate change and reduce our environmental footprint, while boosting economic growth, employment and development.

    resource​_efficiency​_report​_march​_2017​_web​_res.pdf (22 MB)
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  • The Long Road Ahead: Status Report on the Implementation of the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangements on Professional Services

    Over the past decade, ASEAN has signed Mutual Recognition Arrangements (MRAs) in seven occupations, all designed to faci

    Over the past decade, ASEAN has signed Mutual Recognition Arrangements (MRAs) in seven occupations, all designed to facilitate professional mobility within the region.

    MRAs are not easy to operationalize, however. Despite progress in key areas, Member States face complex challenges as they move toward full implementation. This report is the latest in a project by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) to improve understanding of the barriers to the free movement of professionals within ASEAN and to support the development of strategies to overcome these hurdles. The report draws on the insights of nearly 400 ASEAN and Member State officials, private-sector employers, training directors, and others who participated in focus group discussions, meetings, and surveys convened by ADB and MPI.

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    long​-road​-ahead.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Safeguarding the Rights of Asian Migrant Workers from Home to the Workplace

    This report points to the growing number of labor migrants in Asia and examines the policy question of how to best safeg

    This report points to the growing number of labor migrants in Asia and examines the policy question of how to best safeguard their rights. Governments and stakeholders in both origin and destination countries have largely recognized their mutual interest in safeguarding labor migrants. Multilateral frameworks have also put this in focus, with safe and orderly migration seen as important. This report examines some of the key policy questions in protecting migrant workers, including how to promote fair recruitment of less-skilled workers, and how to address vulnerable groups such as irregular migrants and domestic workers.

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    adbi​-safeguarding​-rights​-asian​-migrant​-workers.pdf (4 MB)
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  • FAO and the SDGs

    On 25 September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development &n

    On 25 September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – including 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets – committing the international community to end poverty and hunger and achieve sustainable development between 2016 and 2030. Six months later, a global indicator framework for the SDGs – comprising 230 indicators - was identified to monitor the 169 targets and track progress, becoming the foundation of the SDGs’ accountability structure. The number of indicators - four times greater than for the MDGs - represents an immense challenge for countries. FAO - proposed ‘custodian’ UN agency for 21 SDG indicators and a contributing agency for six more – can assist countries in meeting the new monitoring challenges. This publication presents FAO’s work in developing and strengthening indicators that measure food, agriculture and the sustainable use of natural resources, shining a light on the 21 indicators of FAO custodianship. It describes how the organization can support countries track progress and make the connection between monitoring and policymaking to achieve the SDGs.

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    a​-i6919e.pdf (2 MB)
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  • CIFOR Priorities 2017: Advancing research for forests and people

    Aligned with CIFOR’s 2016-2025 Strategy, this document serves as a ‘road map’ to putting the strategy

    Aligned with CIFOR’s 2016-2025 Strategy, this document serves as a ‘road map’ to putting the strategy in practice through our impact-oriented research, capacity building, and outreach and engagement activities. Produced on a yearly basis and reviewed at CIFOR’s Annual Meeting, it aims to guide funding partners, implementing partners and staff on CIFOR’s current and future plans to meet the most pressing challenges of forest and landscape management around the world.

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    PCIFOR1701.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Creating mutual benefits: examples of gender and biodiversity outcomes from Bioversity International’s research

    Bioversity International uses a gender lens to support the differentiated gender-specific knowledge and priorities linke

    Bioversity International uses a gender lens to support the differentiated gender-specific knowledge and priorities linked to women’s and men’s access and management of resources. Women and men have different aspirations, skills and knowledge. The following pages comprise a series of fact sheets featuring Bioversity International case studies with local NGOs and partners. These case studies illustrate successful outcomes in gender and biodiversity through the use of gender-specific research methods.

    Creating​_GSICP.pdf (15 MB)
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  • From MDGs to Sustainable Development For All: Lessons from 15 Years of Practice

    In 2015, world leaders set out to defy the odds, committing themselves to achieve 17 ambitious and far-reaching Sustaina

    In 2015, world leaders set out to defy the odds, committing themselves to achieve 17 ambitious and far-reaching Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. This was not the first time the world had attempted to raise the trajectory of human progress by employing Global Goals. In 2000, world leaders blazed a trail by adopting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs were the first attempt to use Global Goals to capture and advance the shared interest we all have, in a more just, peaceful and prosperous world.

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    From the MDGs to SD4All.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs

    This UNDP-World Bank Report pulls together the main lessons learned from the MDG Reviews for the UN system and for its e

    This UNDP-World Bank Report pulls together the main lessons learned from the MDG Reviews for the UN system and for its engagement at the country level, which took place at the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB). The Reviews, which brought together UN and World Bank Group staff, systematically identified the country situation, the bottlenecks to MDG attainment, and potential solutions to be implemented. Since many MDGs have been absorbed into the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), many of the observations and solutions provided could prove useful to the implementation of the SDGs.

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    Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Advancing nationally determined contributions (NDCs) through climate-friendly refrigeration and air-conditioning

     At the 28th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (MP) in October 2016 in Kigali, parties agreed to phas

     At the 28th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (MP) in October 2016 in Kigali, parties agreed to phase down hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) emissions over the next three decades, thereby building a fundamental pillar to achieving the ultimate goal set out in the Paris Agreement about a year earlier. According to an analysis by G. Velders et al (2016), the Kigali Amendment will avoid nearly 90 per cent of the temperature increase that HFCs could have caused.

    The following guidance assists policymakers to design national mitigation strategies for their refrigeration, air conditioning and foam (RAC&F) sector to meet the increasing ambition levels expected in revised NDCs. By aligning efforts taken under the two relevant international regimes, the UNFCCC and the Montreal Protocol, the RAC&F sector can make a significant contribution towards reaching the 2°C target, or even better, the enhanced 1,5°C target.

    giz​_2016​_advancing​_ndcs​_through​_climate​_friendly​_refrigeration.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Mekong Development Report 2016

    Launched in 1998, the East-West Economic Corridor—encompassing the less developed provinces of Myanmar, Lao PDR, T

    Launched in 1998, the East-West Economic Corridor—encompassing the less developed provinces of Myanmar, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Vietnam—is one of the flagship initiatives of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) in order to improve the economic situation of these areas. Although countries in the EWEC have recently experienced sheer economic growth, unfortunately this growth is unbalanced with the industrial sector growing faster than the agricultural sector, contributing to worsening income inequality. This problem needs to be addressed and tackled urgently as the majority of population depends largely on agriculture, which is declining in its importance. Taken this issue into account, this comprehensive document focuses on three specific agricultural value chains in three target provinces - a rice value chain in Khammouane province of Lao PDR, a coffee value chain in Quang Tri province of Vietnam, and a maize value chain in Kayin State of Myanmar – in order to address prospects and constraints for value chain development, examine costs and margin for each actor in the value chain, and suggest actions to minimize the constraints and maximize the prospects.

    Mekong​_Development​_Report​_r261016.pdf (12 MB)
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  • The role of community forestry in climate change adaptation in the ASEAN region

    This paper summarizes key discussions from the 1st ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC)

    This paper summarizes key discussions from the 1st ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC) Learning Group workshop organized by RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests in August 2015. The discussions highlight a number of ways community forestry (CF) can support local communities in adapting to climate change.

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    the​_role​_of​_cf​_in​_climate​_change​_adaptation​_in​_asean​_2015​_english.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Landscape Partnerships for Sustainable Development: Achieving the SDGs through Integrated Landscape Management

    To achieve the SDGs by 2030 will require a radically different paradigm of development than was applied to the Millenniu

    To achieve the SDGs by 2030 will require a radically different paradigm of development than was applied to the Millennium Development Goals. A new approach that breaks down sectoral barriers, capitalizes on synergies in land uses and human development, and strengthens coordination and participation of a wide range of stakeholders is needed. Integrated landscape management (ILM) is that approach. This paper makes the case for how we get there.

    LPFN​_WhitePaper​_112415c​_lowres.pdf (880 KB)
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  • Greening Integration in Asia: How Regional Integration Can Benefit People and the Environment

    Regional Integration is stepping up in Asia. The launch of the ASEAN community by the end of 2015 and the possible estab

    Regional Integration is stepping up in Asia. The launch of the ASEAN community by the end of 2015 and the possible establishment of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) signal a new era of deepened regional integration. These and other regional initiatives will influence how Asia develops over the coming decades.

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    IGESGreeningIntergrationAsiaV2015​_eng​_web.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN (Rice, Maize and Cassava)

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN (Rice, Maize and Cassava)

    The study on Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN.pdf (9 MB)
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  • Spatial Planning and Monitoring of Landscape Interventions: Maps to Link People with their Landscapes

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  • Ground-Based Photo-Monitoring of Landscape Changes Arising from Sustainable Land Management Practices

    Aimed at sustainable land management researchers and practitioners, the method presented here uses photographs to track

    Aimed at sustainable land management researchers and practitioners, the method presented here uses photographs to track land-use changes in order to evaluate the progress and effectiveness of specific management practices. The user guide includes an overview of ground-based photo-monitoring, its capabilities and limitations and provides suggestions for those interested in adopting the methodology.

    GBPM​_UsersGuide​_10November2014.pdf (5 MB)
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  • A Landscape Perspective on Monitoring & Evaluation for Sustainable Land Management

    This manual will aid trainers of sustainable land management (SLM) professionals to organize and conduct effective cours

    This manual will aid trainers of sustainable land management (SLM) professionals to organize and conduct effective courses on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) from an integrated landscape management perspective.

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  • ASSESSING GLOBAL LAND USE: Balancing Consumption With Sustainable Supply

    Global cropland is expanding. Changing trends in both the production and consumption of land-based products are increasi

    Global cropland is expanding. Changing trends in both the production and consumption of land-based products are increasing pressure on land resources across the globe. This report discusses the need and options to balance consumption with sustainable production. It focuses on land-based products (food, fuels and fibre) and describes methods which enable countries to determine whether their consumption levels exceed sustainable supply capacities. Strategies and measures are outlined which will allow adjusting the policy framework to balance consumption with these capacities.

    full​_report​-assessing​_global​_land​_useenglish​_pdf.pdf (5 MB)
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