Water and Sanitation

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Percentage of rural population with access to improved sanitation facilities

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Percentage of rural population with access to improved water sources

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Percentage of urban population with access to improved sanitation facilities

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Percentage of urban population with access to improved water sources

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Ayeyarwady River Basin

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Chao Phraya River Basin

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Environment Projects in GMS Landscapes

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GMS Dams

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GMS River Basins

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GMS Sea Ports

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Mekong River Basin

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Pearl River Basin

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Red River Basin

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Thanlwin River Basin

  • September 07, 2017
    MRC

    Transboundary Water Resources Management Issues in the Sesan and Srepok River Basins of Cambodia and Viet Nam

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    This technical report describes priority issues for the management of water resources in the Sesan and Srepok River Basins along the borders of Cambodia and Viet Nam. Among key issues identified are insufficient monitoring and assessment of water flow, lack of flood forecasting and warning mechanisms, and limited mitigation measures to address the impacts of hydro-infrastructural development. This is a joint paper produced by the two countries under the Mekong Integrated Water Resources Management Project. 

    SESAN​-SREPOK​-Issue​-paper​-Final​-7​-Sep​-18.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 07, 2017
    MRC

    Transboundary Fisheries Management Issues in the Mekong and Sekong Rivers of Cambodia and Lao PDR

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    This technical report describes priority issues for fisheries management in the Mekong and Sekong Rivers along the borders of Cambodia and Lao PDR. It cites exploitative fishing practices, habitat degradation, and lack of fisheries data and their sharing between two countries’ affected provinces as some of the key issues identified. This is a joint paper produced by the two countries under the Mekong Integrated Water Resources Management Project. 

    MEKONG​-SEKONG​-issue​-paper​-Final​-7​-Sep​-17​-for​-web.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 07, 2017
    MRC

    Transboundary Water Resources Management Issues in the Mekong Delta of Cambodia and Viet Nam

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    This technical report explains priority issues for the management of water resources in the Mekong Delta across Cambodia and Viet Nam. The issues identified include lack of strategic transboundary management plan of flood and drought control, uncoordinated development of water infrastructure and limited monitoring network on hydrological, meteorological and water quality data. This is a joint paper produced by the two countries under the Mekong Integrated Water Resources Management Project. 

    MEKONG​-DELTA​-Issue​-paper​-7​-Sep​-17​-for​-web.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    ADB

    Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2017

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    The Key Indicators presents the latest statistics on a comprehensive set of economic, financial, social, environmental, and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators for the 48 regional members of the Asian Development Bank. It is designed to serve as a resource for information on development issues across the region for a wide audience, including policy makers, development practitioners, government officials, researchers, students, and the general public.

    A key component of this year’s report is a summary of findings from three pilot household surveys to support the development of standardized methods and guidelines for collecting sex-disaggregated data on asset ownership.

    Click here for more detial.

    key​-indicators​-2017.pdf (6 MB)
  • August 01, 2017
    RECOFTC

    Moving from information dissemination to community participation in forest landscapes: How development organizations in Asia and the Pacific are using participatory development communication approaches

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    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused on the dissemination of technical information to end-users who were expected to adopt them. Development practitioners were trying to ‘push’ their products on communities in order to receive community commitment to their development initiatives. Further, when planning communication strategies, many projects tend to take a very broad problem as a starting point (a declining forest, for example) and then move right into planning communication activities (for example, information sessions, awareness campaigns). The result is that the target is often missed and despite all the activities undertaken the problem remains unaddressed. Participatory development communication (PDC) takes a different approach. It suggests a shift in focus from informing people with a view to changing their behaviours or attitudes to facilitating exchanges between various stakeholders. These exchanges help the stakeholders to address a common problem or implement a joint development initiative. PDC is a systematic process using participatory techniques and communication media (such as radio, newspapers, TV, social media) to empower communities to participate in the development process, enable them to take the lead on its activities and use the learning generated to improve their livelihoods. The purpose of PDC is to seek sustainable social change by engaging and empowering relevant stakeholders (FAO, 2014). At the heart of PDC and other participatory research and development approaches is people’s meaningful participation and empowerment. This paper offers a brief overview of the basic and practical steps involved in the PDC process to assist sustainable forest practitioners and communication officers to adopt a PDC approach in their work. The paper then reviews the PDC components of six case studies promoting sustainable forest management in Asia and the Pacific. Each project was conducted in 2015–16 and included a primary objective of influencing ‘community awareness and attitudes’ towards sustainable forest management. While the case studies do not offer examples of the complete PDC approach, they highlight how sustainable forest management projects in the Asia-Pacific region are moving away from one-way information dissemination toward using two-way communication approaches and tools to promote community participation in forest decision-making. The case studies were developed following a joint RECOFTC and FAO workshop on 12–15 May 2015 to improve the capacities of forestry communication officers from governments and NGOs to plan, develop and facilitate participatory development processes in building and implementing more effective communication strategies. Workshop participants are members of the Asia-Pacific Forest Communication Network (APFCN).

    Click here for more detial

    participatory​_development​_communcation​_case​_studies​_08​_2017​_en.pdf (5 MB)
  • July 26, 2017
    UNESCAP

    Regional Road Map for Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific

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    At the global level in 2015 countries set in motion the most far reaching and ambitious development agenda of our time, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In Asia and the Pacific, countries have already begun translating this ambitious agenda into action and many have already set up the national architecture for coordinating and promoting the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, the policy transformations required to put countries on track to achieve the SDGs have yet to take shape across this or any other region. Business as usual policies and investments are locking countries into unsustainable pathways that will create a gap between ambition and action.

    Click here for more detial.

    Final SDG Roadmap​_Updated Logo.pdf (631 KB)
  • July 10, 2017
    UNESCAP

    Statistical Yearbook for Asia and the Pacific 2016: SDG Baseline Report

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    The report presents the SDG baseline for the Asia and the Pacific both at the regional and sub-regional levels for selected targets of each SDG. The main objective of the Report is to highlight critical gaps and challenges of the region in achieving the SDGs and inform inter-governmental and inter-agency regional decision making in support of implementing the 2030 development agenda in the region.

    The report is organized in three parts:

    • Part I provides a regional snapshot of progress since 2000 (starting of the MDGs) and acceleration that is required in order for the region to achieve the 16 goals by 2030. This is further elaborated in a dashboard across the target areas, highlighting the size of the gaps between a “business-as-usual” scenario and the required pace of progress by 2030.
    • Part II then sets out a more detailed, goal by goal baseline for the region for selected targets, drawing on the latest data available on the proposed global indicators as well as supplementary statistical information.
    • Part III concludes by highlighting key findings of the baseline report and the regional vision for transforming official statistics to tackle challenges in meeting the statistics and data requirements for the follow-up and review of the 2030 agenda. It also emphasize critical role of data disaggregation for achieving the leave-no-one-behind ambition of the SDGs.

    Click here for more detial.

    ESCAP​_SYB2016​_SDG​_baseline​_report.pdf (28 MB)
  • June 30, 2017
    the Stimson Center’s Southeast Asia

    Mekong Power Shift: Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector

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  • June 01, 2017
    IUCN

    Guidelines for tourism partnerships and concessions for protected areas: Generating sustainable revenues for conservation and development

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    Many Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) underutilise tourism as a means to contribute towards the financial sustainability of protected areas. The development of the present guidelines on tourism partnerships and concessions for protected areas is a response to this under-utilized potential and to recent decisions of the CBD on tourism.

    Click here for more detial.

    2017​-044.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 16, 2017
    EcoAgriculture Partners, IUCN

    Business for Sustainable Landscapes

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    This report draws widely from the diverse experience of landscape partnerships to analyze the challenges and opportunities for businesses and their partners, and lays out critical actions needed by businesses themselves, and by financial institutions, governments and landscape programs, to improve the effectiveness of landscape partnerships and replicate the approach in many more places.

    Business​-for​-Sustainable​-Landscapes​-An​-Action​-Agenda​-for​-Sustainable​-Development​-May​-2017.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 02, 2017
    UNEA

    UN Environment's Freshwater Strategy 2017 – 2021

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    This document describes UN Environment’s five-year Freshwater Strategy from 2017 to 2021. As a living document, it is intended to guide work related to freshwater across UN Environment’s divisions, sub-programmes and regional offices, as well as interactions with governments and partners at national, regional and global levels. The Freshwater Strategy supports the implementation of UN Environment’s Medium-Term Strategy and Programme of Work adopted by universal United Nations (UN) membership through the UN Environment Assembly. Coming at a critical time for freshwater in general, and the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular, this strategy aims to unlock the potential of integrated collaboration and spur leadership on freshwater issues globally.

    Click here for more detial.

    UNEP​-full​_report​-170502.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    ADB

    Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific: 50 Years of The Asian Development Bank

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    This book is a history of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a multilateral development bank established 50 years ago to serve Asia and the Pacific.

    Focusing on the region’s economic development, the evolution of the international development agenda, and the story of ADB itself, Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific raises several key questions: What are the outstanding features of regional development to which ADB had to respond? How has the bank grown and evolved in changing circumstances? How did ADB’s successive leaders promote reforms while preserving continuity with the efforts of their predecessors? ADB has played an important role in the transformation of Asia and the Pacific over the past 50 years. As ADB continues to evolve and adapt to the region’s changing development landscape, the experiences highlighted in this book can provide valuable insight on how best to serve Asia and the Pacific in the future.

    50years​-adb.pdf (5 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    ADB

    Financing Asian Irrigation: Choices Before Us

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    By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Improved irrigation productivity and greater financial sustainability are critical.

    Water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in the Asia Pacific region. By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Climate change and rapid population growth will place new pressures on already scarce water resources. Improved irrigation productivity—more crop per drop—and greater financial sustainability are critical. Estimates for the Asian region place a $12.31 billion annual investment required for irrigation between 2005 and 2013.

    This publication looks into how the Asia and Pacific region is addressing the need to sustainably fund large-scale, publicly owned and managed surface irrigation and drainage systems.

    financing​-asian​-immigration.pdf (2 MB)
  • April 24, 2017
    SEI

    SEI Annual Report 2016

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  • March 01, 2017
    ADB

    Earth Observation for a Transforming Asia and Pacific

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    Satellite-based environmental information are innovative solutions that can provide new ways for ADB to serve and address development challenges.

    This report summarizes results of the initiative Earth Observation for a Transforming Asia and Pacific (EOTAP), that brought together the European Space Agency (ESA) and ADB to promote and demonstrate satellite Earth Observation in support of ADB’s investments in its developing member countries (DMCs).

    Click here for more detail.

    earth​-observation​-asia​-pacific.pdf (13 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    UNEP

    Resource Efficiency: Potential and Economic Implications

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    As our population continues to grow, so does the pressure on our finite and fragile resources. Yet that threat can be turned into an opportunity to deliver the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the massive potential of using increased efficiency as a costeffective way to protect resources, tackle climate change and reduce our environmental footprint, while boosting economic growth, employment and development.

    resource​_efficiency​_report​_march​_2017​_web​_res.pdf (22 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    ADB

    Economics of Climate Change Mitigation in Central and West Asia

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    This report provides an assessment of the costs, benefits, and investment opportunities for GHG abatement in the energy and transport sectors of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan.

    The ecological complexity of the Central and West Asian region gives way to diverse ecosystems with rich natural resources and hydrocarbon reserves; countries in this region are not only exposed to climate change risks, but there is growing recognition that their carbon-intensive economies necessitate reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in line with global efforts to mitigate climate change.

    The Economics of Climate Change in Central and West Asia, a regional technical assistance (TA) project of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) was designed to identify costs and opportunities in investments for low-carbon growth and climate resilience and low-carbon growth, under two components:

    • mitigation of climate change, which assessed the costs and benefits of GHG emission reduction measures and formulated low-carbon growth investment proposals for energy and transport in the most carbon-intensive countries in the region; and
    • adaptation to climate change, which assessed the costs and benefits of implementing adaptation measures to reduce the adverse effects of climate change on energy and water resources in the most vulnerable countries.
    economics​-climatechange​-cwa.pdf (2 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    FAO

    FAO and the SDGs

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    On 25 September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – including 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets – committing the international community to end poverty and hunger and achieve sustainable development between 2016 and 2030. Six months later, a global indicator framework for the SDGs – comprising 230 indicators - was identified to monitor the 169 targets and track progress, becoming the foundation of the SDGs’ accountability structure. The number of indicators - four times greater than for the MDGs - represents an immense challenge for countries. FAO - proposed ‘custodian’ UN agency for 21 SDG indicators and a contributing agency for six more – can assist countries in meeting the new monitoring challenges. This publication presents FAO’s work in developing and strengthening indicators that measure food, agriculture and the sustainable use of natural resources, shining a light on the 21 indicators of FAO custodianship. It describes how the organization can support countries track progress and make the connection between monitoring and policymaking to achieve the SDGs.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6919e.pdf (2 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    World Resources Institute

    Attracting Private Investment to Landscape Restoration: A Roadmap

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    Many restoration projects seek to raise capital, but restoration leaders often lack knowledge of the investment process. The New Restoration Economy—part of the Global Restoration Initiative at the World Resources Institute—has found that successful efforts to attract private capital involve four steps. The roadmap elaborates on each of these four steps in turn and is based on our global experience in restoration and our insider perspective on the investment process.

    Attracting​_Private​_Investment​_to​_Landscape​_Restoration​_​-​_A​_Roadmap​_0.pdf (403 KB)
  • December 19, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary Lakes and Reservoirs: Status and Future Trends (Volume 2)

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  • December 06, 2016
    UNDP

    BIOFIN Workbook: Mobilizing Resources for Biodiversity and Sustainable Development

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    The 2016 BIOFIN Workbook was developed based on the inputs and lessons generated from BIOFIN implementation in 30 countries: Belize, Brazil, Botswana, Bhutan, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Fiji, Georgia, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, Mozambique, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam and Zambia.

    Click here for more detail.

    BIOFINWorkbook2016.pdf (5 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    ADB

    Nature-Based Solutions for Building Resilience in Towns and Cities: Case Studies from the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    Green infrastructure can play a significant role in offsetting losses from climate-related disasters and contribute to building resilience through rehabilitation and expansion of natural ecosystems within built areas.

    Urban populations are projected to increase from 54% to 66% of the global population by 2050, with close to 90% of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. Cities and towns—a growing source of greenhouse gas emissions—will need to address challenges posed by climate change. A nature-based approach in identifying climate change vulnerabilities and developing relevant adaptation options was conducted in three towns of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS).

    Working with local governments, nongovernment organizations, women’s groups, and professional associations, town-wide adaptation measures were defined by overlaying climate change projections on town plans and zoning schemes for strategic infrastructure. This publication captures valuable experience and lessons from the project.

    nature​-based​-solutions.pdf (6 MB)
  • November 15, 2016
    UNDP

    From MDGs to Sustainable Development For All: Lessons from 15 Years of Practice

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    In 2015, world leaders set out to defy the odds, committing themselves to achieve 17 ambitious and far-reaching Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. This was not the first time the world had attempted to raise the trajectory of human progress by employing Global Goals. In 2000, world leaders blazed a trail by adopting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs were the first attempt to use Global Goals to capture and advance the shared interest we all have, in a more just, peaceful and prosperous world.

    Click here for more detail.

    From the MDGs to SD4All.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 11, 2016
    WWF

    The Mekong River in the Economy Report

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    The Mekong River in the Economy report aims to reframe the debate around development and river resources management, guiding policy makers towards increased sustainability as well as continued growth.

    The two are not incompatible, but interdependent. The report lays out the benefits of integrating planning in a series of short narratives, highlighting the major risks and opportunities for different sectors within each Lower Mekong Basin country and illustrating how one actor’s development decisions are felt through the entire river system.

    WWF 2016​-Mekong River in the Economy.pdf (6 MB)
  • November 09, 2016
    UNDP

    Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs

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    This UNDP-World Bank Report pulls together the main lessons learned from the MDG Reviews for the UN system and for its engagement at the country level, which took place at the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB). The Reviews, which brought together UN and World Bank Group staff, systematically identified the country situation, the bottlenecks to MDG attainment, and potential solutions to be implemented. Since many MDGs have been absorbed into the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), many of the observations and solutions provided could prove useful to the implementation of the SDGs.

    Click here for more detail.

    Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 01, 2016
    Mekong Institute

    Study On Market & Value Chain Mapping in the Southern Economic Corridor and Southern Coastal Corridor of the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    Study of SME Cluster Value Chain of 19 Provinces along the SouthernEconomic Corridor and Southern Coastal Corridor of the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    Study​_on​_Market​_and​_Value​_Chain​_Mapping.pdf (11 MB)
  • September 01, 2016
    Mekong Institute

    Mekong Development Report 2016

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    Launched in 1998, the East-West Economic Corridor—encompassing the less developed provinces of Myanmar, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Vietnam—is one of the flagship initiatives of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) in order to improve the economic situation of these areas. Although countries in the EWEC have recently experienced sheer economic growth, unfortunately this growth is unbalanced with the industrial sector growing faster than the agricultural sector, contributing to worsening income inequality. This problem needs to be addressed and tackled urgently as the majority of population depends largely on agriculture, which is declining in its importance. Taken this issue into account, this comprehensive document focuses on three specific agricultural value chains in three target provinces - a rice value chain in Khammouane province of Lao PDR, a coffee value chain in Quang Tri province of Vietnam, and a maize value chain in Kayin State of Myanmar – in order to address prospects and constraints for value chain development, examine costs and margin for each actor in the value chain, and suggest actions to minimize the constraints and maximize the prospects.

    Mekong​_Development​_Report​_r261016.pdf (12 MB)
  • August 03, 2016

    Myanmar Environmental Policies and Legislation

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    Myanmar Environmental Policies and Legislation are available at:

          -Myanmar Parliament website

          -Mekong Law Center website

  • August 01, 2016

    China Environmental Policies and Legislation

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    Environmental laws, environment related laws, environment related regulations and regulation interpretaton of The People's Republic of China are available on Ministry of Environmental Protection website.

    Source: Ministry of Environmental Protection.

  • August 01, 2016

    Thailand Environmental Policies and Legislation

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    Thailand Environmental Policies and Legislation are available to download from:

          -Pollutional Control Department website, MoNRE.

          -Office of the Council of State website

          -Mekong Regional Law Center

  • June 15, 2016
    UNDP

    Integrated Planning and Sustainable Development: Challenges and Opportunities

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    This Synthesis Report and the eight country studies on which it draws, have been prepared through the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE), with funds from the European Commission. The report illustrates the many different sustainable development pathways that countries are pursuing in line with national priorities and contexts. Its country-based evidence and non-prescriptive findings for policymakers and practitioners highlight the need for integrated and coherent development policies, while illustrating a range of inclusive green economy solutions. As such, this report represents an important addition to the global community’s demand-driven resources for advancing the 2030 Agenda.

    Click here for more detail.

    PAGE​_Integrated​_Planning​_and​_SD​_SynthesisReport.pdf (3 MB)
  • May 31, 2016
    UNDP

    2015 UNDP-GEF Annual Performance Report

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    This eighth annual performance report of the UNDP Global Environmental Finance (UNDP-GEF) Unit has three primary goals: one, to provide a snapshot of progress made toward multiple development and environment benefits by projects in each region in 2015 – see Demonstrating Impact; two, to highlight progress made in addressing women, work and the environment – see Gender in Action; and three, to demonstrate the services UNDP provides to the vertical funds that it is accredited to, in particular the Global Environment Facility family of funds – see UNDP-GEF Unit. In addition, development and environment benefits that have been realized through projects and that can be reasonably aggregated at the regional and/or global levels are presented in a series of infographics.  This report demonstrates how investments in the environment in 141 countries are already delivering development benefits. 

    Click here for more detail.

    2015 Annual Performance Report of UNDP​-Supported GEF​-Financed Projects​_DigitalFile.pdf (6 MB)
  • May 18, 2016
    UNEP

    The Open Ocean: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 5)

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  • May 17, 2016
    Mekong Institute

    Development Potential for International Shipping on the Lancang-Mekong River (China, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Thailand)

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    The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) has seen rapid economic growth of its country membersduring the past two decades, especially the effectiveness of the ASEAN-China FTA. Together with adeeper and greater economic integration process in line with the ASEAN Economic Community(AEC) blueprint, the implementation of the Lancang-Mekong (LM) Cooperation Mechanism, China’s“the Belt and the Road” initiative, and other regional and subregional cooperation frameworks, thereis a greater demand for the development of transport and logistics infrastructure as well as serviceslinkages where the logistics and transport multimodal have been applied and developed in the region.

    In the new development context, Lancang-Mekong (LM) River, as a key part of the GMS transportnetwork, plays a crucial role in transport connectivity between the upper and lower riverine countriesthrough the waterborne navigation system. This navigation system is now fronting both opportunitiesand challenges that have drawn greater attention from China, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (LaoPDR), Myanmar, and Thailand (CLMT) through a due consideration of the potential development ofthe international shipping and transportation route from Simao District in Yunnan Province, China toLuang Prabang in the Lao PDR.

    Development​_Potential​_for​_International​_Shipping​_on​_the​_Lancang​-Mekong​_River.pdf (10 MB)
  • April 05, 2016
    MRC

    MRC: Basin Development Strategy 2016 – 2020 for the Lower Mekong Basin

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    A Dynamic Strategy: responding to change and uncertainty

    The Basin Development Strategy for 2016-2020 (henceforth BDS 2016-2020) replaces the 2011-2015 Strategy. This updating reflects the dynamic challenges encountered in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB).  The Mekong, one of the world’s greatest rivers, is an exceptionally complex system with high intra-annual and inter-annual flow variability caused by the Southwest Monsoon, bringing both great risks and opportunities.  It is also a rapidly changing river because of its contribution to the rapid economic development of the basin countries, but also as a consequence of this development on the river itself, including the impacts of increasing population, urbanisation and industrialisation. Adding to these on-going changes are uncertain futures, particularly as a consequence of climate change.

    Click here for detail.

    MRC​-BDP​-strategy​-complete​-final​-02.16.pdf (3 MB)
  • March 01, 2016
    UNEP

    Natural Capital Assessments at the National and Sub-National level: A Guide for Environmental Practitioners

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    Natural capital refers to the stocks of the Earth's natural assets and resources, such as soil, water, air and biodiversity.

    This Guide for Environmental Practitioners from UNEP is a guidance document which's presents eight steps to completing Natural Capital Assessments to inform decision making that supports sustainable economic growth.

    Natural Capital Assessments ​- Guide For Enviro Practictioners ​- UNEP 2016.pdf (3 MB)
  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Large Marine Ecosystems: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 4)

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  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary Aquifers and Groundwater Systems of Small Island Developing States: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 1)

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  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary river basins: Status and trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 3)

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  • January 13, 2016
    MRC

    MRC: 20 Years of C20 Yearso of Coooperaption eration

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    The year 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the Mekong Agreement on Cooperation for the Sustainable Development of the Mekong River Basin. Signed in Chiang Rai on April 5, 1995, the agreement between Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Viet Nam

    20th​-year​-MRC​-2016.pdf (6 MB)
  • January 01, 2016
    FAO

    Towards the implementation of the SSF Guidelines in the Southeast Asia region

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    Following the endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) by the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in June 2014 and in line with paragraph 13.6 of the document itself, promoting the development regional plans of action for their implementation, a regional workshop was held in Southeast Asia to discuss implementation of the SSF Guidelines.

    The workshop was co-organized by the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) of the Republic of Indonesia and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) and the FAO Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) Project. Some 116participants attended the workshop representing governments, regional and international organizations, fisherfolk organizations, civil society organization, non-governmental organizations, academia and other relevant actors. The workshop acknowledged the importance of the SSF Guidelines for the Southeast Asia region and agreed on a number of priority action areas for inclusion in a regional plan of action to be developed with the support of SEAFDEC. National plans of action will also be promoted, and the workshop outcomes will be reflected in the implementation planning of the BOBLME Strategic Action Plan (SAP). FAO will continue to support these processes in collaboration with its partners with a view to securing sustainable small-scale fisheries and enhancing the sector’s contribution to food and nutrition security, poverty alleviation and natural resources management.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i5253e.pdf (3 MB)
  • December 04, 2015
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Landscape Partnerships for Sustainable Development: Achieving the SDGs through Integrated Landscape Management

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    To achieve the SDGs by 2030 will require a radically different paradigm of development than was applied to the Millennium Development Goals. A new approach that breaks down sectoral barriers, capitalizes on synergies in land uses and human development, and strengthens coordination and participation of a wide range of stakeholders is needed. Integrated landscape management (ILM) is that approach. This paper makes the case for how we get there.

    LPFN​_WhitePaper​_112415c​_lowres.pdf (880 KB)
  • December 01, 2015
    RECOFTC

    A mapping of ecosystem services in Quang Tri and Ha Tinh provinces, Viet Nam

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    Goods and services provided by functioning ecosystems contribute directly and indirectly to human welfare and therefore represent a significant, yet often uncounted, portion of the total economic value of the landscape we live in. While there are many ways that humans can value their landscape, the ability to estimate the economic value of ecosystem goods and services provided by a landscape is increasingly recognized as a valuable tool in weighing trade-offs in environmental decision-making and land-use planning.

    EcoSystemMappingReport​_vietnam​_FINAL.pdf (5 MB)
  • November 18, 2015
    Oxfam

    Working Paper on Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of Hydropower Development Lower Mekong Basin

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    This working paper is a revised, condensed version of the report ‘Planning Approaches for Water Resources Development in the Lower Mekong Basin’ by Portland State University, Oregon and Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai (Robert Costanza et al. 2011).

    Working Paper on Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of Hydropower Development Lower Mekong Basin.pdf (855 KB)
  • October 08, 2015
    WWF

    Linking Rapid Erosion of the Mekong River Delta to Human Activities

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    This scientific report investigates the link between human activities and erosion in the Mekong Delta. It concludes that hydroelectric dams and sand mining are causing considerable, and possibly unrecoverable, erosion damage.

    Linking Rapid Erosion of the Mekong River Delta to Human Activities.pdf (2 MB)
  • June 01, 2015
    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

    Economic Valuation Of Wastewater: The Cost Of Action And The Cost Of No Action

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    This book presents the results of an analytical study on the economic valuation for wastewater, comparing the costof no action versus the cost of effective wastewater management.

    ​-Economic​_Valuation​_of​_Wastewater​_​_The​_Cost​_of​_Action​_and​_the​_Cost​_of​_No​_Action​-2015Wastewater​_Evaluation​_Report​_Mail.pdf.pdf (8 MB)
  • March 27, 2015
    FAO

    Developing an Environmental Monitoring System to Strengthen Fisheries and Aquaculture Resilience and Improve Early Warning in the Lower Mekong Basin

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    These proceedings report the result of a sub-regional consultation on the existence and effectiveness of environmental monitoring systems for fisheries and aquaculture in the Lower Mekong basin. The document also includes a baseline assessment of environmental monitoring systems in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, and the report of a regional workshop to discuss the assessments findings and future steps to improve an environmental monitoring and early warning system that will improve climate change adaptation in fisheries and aquaculture in the area.

    FAO​-Developing an Environmental Monitoring System.pdf (2 MB)
  • February 06, 2015
    MRC

    Don Sahong Hydropower Project

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    The Mekong River Commission (MRC) is carrying out prior consultation for the Don Sahong Hydropower project to discuss and evaluate benefits and associated risks of the project which may have significant impacts on the environment and people in the Lower Mekong Basin. The Don Sahong Hydropower Project will produce 260 megawatts of electricity and will be situated in one of the braided channels in the Mekong River’s Siphandone area of Southern Lao PDR.

    Click here for detail report.


    Technical​-Review​-Report​-DSHPP​-040315.pdf (1 MB)
  • November 11, 2014
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Spatial Planning and Monitoring of Landscape Interventions: Maps to Link People with their Landscapes

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  • November 11, 2014
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Ground-Based Photo-Monitoring of Landscape Changes Arising from Sustainable Land Management Practices

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    Aimed at sustainable land management researchers and practitioners, the method presented here uses photographs to track land-use changes in order to evaluate the progress and effectiveness of specific management practices. The user guide includes an overview of ground-based photo-monitoring, its capabilities and limitations and provides suggestions for those interested in adopting the methodology.

    GBPM​_UsersGuide​_10November2014.pdf (5 MB)
  • November 01, 2014
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    A Landscape Perspective on Monitoring & Evaluation for Sustainable Land Management

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    This manual will aid trainers of sustainable land management (SLM) professionals to organize and conduct effective courses on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) from an integrated landscape management perspective.

  • September 11, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    Scaling Up Payments for Forest Environmental Services in Viet Nam: Lessons and Insights from Quang Nam

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    This publication features ADB's support to the provincial authorities of Quang Nam in Viet Nam to scale up the implementation of payments for forest environmental services through a technical assistance financed by the Governments of Sweden and Norway. The project pilot-tested two innovations—the group approach and the use of a geographic information system—to speed up payments for forest environmental services planning and implementation in the province. Starting with five villages in Ma Cooih commune, the initiative expanded to include two more communes in the Song Bung 4 watershed. 

    scaling​-up​-payments​-forest​-environmental​-services​-vietnam.pdf (5 MB)
  • August 01, 2014
    UNEP

    Towards a Global Map of Natural Capital - Key Ecosystem Assets

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    This report combines information about key ecosystem assets into global maps covering terrestrial and marine realms. The assets included are freshwater resources, soil quality, organic carbon, terrestrial and marine biodiversity, and global fish catch (as a proxy for marine fish stocks). The report builds on a considerable body of work in the fields of natural capital accounting and the mapping of ecosystem services.

    Towards a Global Map of Natural Capital ​- Key Ecosystem Assets.pdf (6 MB)
  • June 01, 2014
    ICEM

    Natural Systems and Climate Change Resilience in the Lower Mekong Basin

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    This report draws from the past decade of climate change and natural systems work in the Mekong region to summarise findings and lessons for small holder farms and landscape management.

    Click here for more detail.

    LMB Natural Systems Brief JCR final 24 March.pdf (2 MB)
  • May 26, 2014
    Ministry of Water Resources and Meteorology

    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Water Resources and Meteorology 2014 – 2018

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    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Water Resources and Meteorology 2014 - 2018

    ccap​-water resource meteorology​-2014​-2018​-en​-final.pdf (15 MB)
  • May 01, 2014
    Ministry of Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry

    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry Sectors 2014 – 2018

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    Cambodia Climate Change Action Plan for Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry Sectors 2014 - 2018

    ccap​-agriculture​-forestry​-fisheries​-2014​-2018​-en​-final.pdf (25 MB)
  • January 24, 2014
    UNEP

    Building Natural Capital: How REDD+ Can Support A Green Economy

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    REDD+ is the approach adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from forests. REDD+ stands for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, plus conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (UNFCCC, 2010). If systematically pursued, REDD+ would bring new momentum and new funding to the task of preserving the world’s forests. REDD+ is already delivering important outcomes as it brings further world attention to the conservation of tropical forests, monitoring the state of forests, and the contributions of people living in and around forests.

    building​_natural​_capital​_full​_report​_english.pdf (18 MB)
  • January 24, 2014
    UNEP

    ASSESSING GLOBAL LAND USE: Balancing Consumption With Sustainable Supply

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    Global cropland is expanding. Changing trends in both the production and consumption of land-based products are increasing pressure on land resources across the globe. This report discusses the need and options to balance consumption with sustainable production. It focuses on land-based products (food, fuels and fibre) and describes methods which enable countries to determine whether their consumption levels exceed sustainable supply capacities. Strategies and measures are outlined which will allow adjusting the policy framework to balance consumption with these capacities.

    full​_report​-assessing​_global​_land​_useenglish​_pdf.pdf (5 MB)
  • November 20, 2013
    WWF

    Heart of Borneo: Investing in Nature for a Green Economy

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    Until now we have put almost no effort in calculating the value of the Borneo forests. It takes the first steps towards quantifying the unseen value of nature in the Heart of Borneo and tells us that with concerted action, a green development pathway is indeed possible, with greater benefits for everybody, including indigenous communities and the poor. It presents a beacon of hope, with conservation, development and economic growth going hand in hand.  In order to implement its message, the real value of natural capital must be reflected in btoh fiscal planning and the prices of goods and services. There must be financial incentives to stimulate the proper husbandry of natural resources, with realistic valuations given to the crucial issue of the growth of low-carbon markets and sustainable, pro-poor economies. Carbon finance through REDD+ can be a key mechanism to safeguard the forests and unlock their true value.  Governments must take the lead and work with civil society, indigenous groups and the private sector to make sustainable forest management financially worthwhile. The Heart of Borneo is an excellent place to begin. We urgently need a new path towards a sustainable future-one which places a true economic value on nature's gifts and the role they play in providing us with the necessities of life. 
     This report will help us to get closer to creating the green economies that will ensure food, water and energy security for all.

    heart​_of​_borneo​_green​_economy​_main​_report​_2012.pdf (15 MB)
  • August 28, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    Climate Risks in the Mekong Delta-Ca Mau and Kien Giang Provinces of Viet Nam

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    This ADB report provides provincial and district policy makers with an understanding of the key areas of vulnerability and hotspots with regard to climate change in Viet Nam in the period up to 2050. The study identifies potential future climate conditions in the Mekong Delta region and assesses the effects of future climate scenarios on natural, social, and economic systems in the region.

    ADB climate​-risks​-mekong​-delta.pdf (6 MB)
  • December 12, 2012
    Asian Development Bank

    GMS Atlas of the Environment - 2nd Edition

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    Prepared for the 20th Anniversary of the GMS, this second edition of the Atlas offers a unique overview of the exquisite beauty and diversity of the subregion’s natural environment. It also highlights the tremendous progress made by the GMS countries, as well as the need to address the increasing risks that they face. 


    Access the Atlas here.

  • June 01, 2012
    UNEP

    Promoting Upstream-downstream Linkages Through Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Greater Mekong Subregion (UNEP Policy Series)

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    In the context of supporting biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and poverty reduction, this policy paper portrays the critical role that ecosystem management and ecosystem services can play in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). Ecosystem management is"an integrated process to conserve and improve ecosystem health that sustains ecosystem services for human well-being" (UNEP, 2009). The IUCN defines it as "a process that integrates ecological, socio-economic, and institutional factors into comprehensive analysis and action in order to sustain and enhance the quality of the ecosystems to meet current and future needs" (IUCN, 2011). Ecosystem management embraces an interdisciplinary approach that highlights connections between ecological, social-cultural, economic and institutional structures. Underlying the approach is the explicit goal to sustain ecosystem composition, structure, and function while providing for human needs (Grumbine, 1994, Layzer, 2008). Critical to this is ongoing research and monitoring of ecological interactions and processes, and a collaborative, adaptive approach.

    PB12252.pdf (5 MB)