Myanmar

  • Asia-Pacific Disaster Report 2017

    Asia and the Pacific is the region most affected by natural disasters which hit hardest at the poorest countries and com

    Asia and the Pacific is the region most affected by natural disasters which hit hardest at the poorest countries and communities. And on present trends, as more migrants crowd into slums and shanty towns in Asia-Pacific cities, whole communities are likely to see their homes and livelihoods shattered or washed away by the wilder forces of nature.

    This edition of the Asia-Pacific Disaster Report, looks at the extent and impact of natural disasters across the region and how these intersect with poverty, inequality and the effects of violent conflict. But it also shows how scientific and other advances have increased the potential for building disaster resilience and ensuring that even in the most extreme circumstances people can survive disaster impacts and rebuild their communities and livelihoods.

    Disaster resilience is a key element of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Sustainable Development Goals are based on the premise of reaching absolutely everyone. When the drought is assessed, when the flood warnings are broadcast, when the tsunami siren sounds, the aim is to ‘leave no one behind’. If governments are to fulfil this ambition, and protect their most vulnerable people, they will need to ground national development strategies firmly in disaster resilience.

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    Asia​-PacificDisasterReport2017Full.pdf (6 MB)
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  • 2017 Forest change in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS)

    This report looks at both negative and positive drivers that affect forest change in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS)

    This report looks at both negative and positive drivers that affect forest change in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) in the last 25 years (1990-2015) in order to have a better understanding of their influence on forests in the region. It evaluates policies and measures in relation to drivers of forest change. Agricultural expansion, infrastructure development particularly hydropower dams and road construction, logging, mining operations and forest fires are the most dominant drivers of forest loss in GMS. At a positive note, almost all countries in the region have adopted policies that support SFM and balance the social, economic and environmental aspects of forestry. Furthermore, there seems to be a movement towards sustainable policies which influence the shift towards SFM, forest conservation and afforestation and reforestation. Although it seems the policies addressing the drivers of deforestation exist at local, national and international level, their effectiveness has been mixed. T his report presents forest changes in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) over a period of 25 years between 1990 and 2015. It describes key drivers that have affected these changes. Some drivers influenced forests negatively in that they resulted in deforestation and forest degradation. On the other hand, positive drivers promoted sustainable forest management (SFM), afforestation and reforestation and forest conservation.

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    2017 FAO Forest Change in the GMS.pdf (4 MB)
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  • How Improved Land Use Can Contribute to the 1.5°C Goal of the Paris Agreement

    Climate Focus’ How Land Use Can Contribute to the 1.5°C Goal of the Paris Agreement develops a roadm

    Climate Focus’ How Land Use Can Contribute to the 1.5°C Goal of the Paris Agreement develops a roadmap of action for the land-use sector to meet its necessary contribution to the Paris Agreement. The analysis relies on a modelling of land-sector development trajectories optimizing least-cost pathways, a bottom-up assessment of mitigation potentials, and a correction of potentials for political feasibility. The Global Biosphere Management Integrated Assessment Model, a partial-equilibrium model developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, formed the basis of our modelling. We determined the 40 countries with the highest technical mitigation potential and assessed the feasibility of mitigation action based on their political will and ability to realize this potential. Finally, we outlined 10 priority actions to reduce the land-use sector’s contribution to global warming. The actions range from avoided deforestation, restoration of forests, to diet shifts and reduced food waste.

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    CIFF Report.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Towards a pollution-free planet: background report

    Pollution today is pervasive and persistent. While the world has achieved significant economic growth over the past few

    Pollution today is pervasive and persistent. While the world has achieved significant economic growth over the past few decades, it has been accompanied by large amounts of pollution, with significant impacts on human health and ecosystems and the ways in which some of the major Earth system processes, such as the climate, are functioning. This report describes the pollution challenge, explores what is already being done to address pollution, and proposes 50 focused and actionable interventions to address pollution in all its forms. The report is a call to act towards a pollution-free planet.

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    UNEA​_towardspollution​_long version​_Web.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Gender, The Environment and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development strives for more balanced development by addressing the economic, social and

    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development strives for more balanced development by addressing the economic, social and environmental dimensions holistically. The momentum set forth by this agenda provides an historic opportunity for reducing inequality and closing gender gaps. Gender, The Environment and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific examines the intersections between gender and the environment at the household, work, community and policy levels, particularly in the spheres of food security and agriculture, energy, water, fisheries and forestry, with a view to providing strategic entry points for policy interventions. Based on a grounded study of the reality in the Asia-Pacific region, this report assembles good practices and policy lessons that could be capitalized on to advance the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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    SDD​-Gender​-Environment​-report.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2017

    The Key Indicators presents the latest statistics on a comprehensive set of economic, financial, social, environmental,

    The Key Indicators presents the latest statistics on a comprehensive set of economic, financial, social, environmental, and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators for the 48 regional members of the Asian Development Bank. It is designed to serve as a resource for information on development issues across the region for a wide audience, including policy makers, development practitioners, government officials, researchers, students, and the general public.

    A key component of this year’s report is a summary of findings from three pilot household surveys to support the development of standardized methods and guidelines for collecting sex-disaggregated data on asset ownership.

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    key​-indicators​-2017.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Trade Facilitation and Better Connectivity for an Inclusive Asia and Pacific

    This publication investigates the evolution of trade costs, and reviews the state of play of trade facilitation and

    This publication investigates the evolution of trade costs, and reviews the state of play of trade facilitation and paperless trade in Asia and the Pacific.

    Trade facilitation increases trade flows, lowers trade cost, and ultimately contributes to sustainable and inclusive growth. This publication, jointly prepared by the Asian Development Bank and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, reviews the state of play of trade facilitation and paperless trade in Asia and the Pacific. It investigates the evolution of trade costs in the region, examines trade facilitation and paperless trade implementation, and highlights the key initiatives and efforts in Central Asia, the Greater Mekong Subregion, South Asia, and the Pacific. It includes impact assessments of trade facilitation implementation and corridor performance on reducing trade costs and increasing trade.

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    trade​-facilitation​-connectivity.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Myanmar Energy Consumption Surveys

    Results of household energy consumption surveys conducted in 2014 provide a more accurate picture of historical energy c

    Results of household energy consumption surveys conducted in 2014 provide a more accurate picture of historical energy consumption in Myanmar by fuel source.

    Myanmar has one of the fastest growing economies in Asia, yet its potential is severely constrained by limited energy infrastructure. The limited availability of modern energy services and infrastructure has resulted in Myanmar having one of the lowest per capita energy consumption rates in the world.

    A household energy consumption survey in 11 regions across Myanmar shows that firewood is mainly used for cooking (73%) and candles and torches for lighting (65%), followed by electricity for cooking (13%) and battery for lighting (17%) while the demand for modern energy sources is rapidly increasing. This report presents the results of household energy consumption surveys conducted in 2014 that helped develop a more accurate picture of historical energy consumption by fuel source. This publication shares the survey results, considering the scarcity of available energy data and statistics in Myanmar especially at the household level. The data herein may prove useful in making more informed decisions by those involved in Myanmar’s energy and social sectors.

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    myanmar​-energy​-consumption​-surveys.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Climate Change Operational Framework 2017–2030: Enhanced Actions for Low Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate-Resilient Development

    This framework provides direction for enhancing resilience and supporting climate adaptation and mitigation actions in A

    This framework provides direction for enhancing resilience and supporting climate adaptation and mitigation actions in ADB operations and business processes.

    The Climate Change Operational Framework 2017–2030 positions ADB to facilitate, collaboratively and proactively, a regional shift toward a low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development path. The operational framework provides guidance across all ADB sector and thematic groups to strengthen climate actions, operationalizing ADB’s commitment to provide at least $6 billion per year in climate change financing from its own resources by 2020. It outlines actions and the institutional measures to be implemented to enable ADB to meet the climate needs of its developing members.

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    ccof​-2017​-2030.pdf (527 KB)
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  • Catalyzing Green Finance: A Concept for Leveraging Blended Finance for Green Development

    This publication describes an innovative financing solution for enhancing both financially bankable as well as environme

    This publication describes an innovative financing solution for enhancing both financially bankable as well as environmentally sustainable infrastructure projects. A large financing need challenges climate-adjusted infrastructure in developing Asia, estimated at $26 trillion till 2030. This necessitates crowding-in private sources to meet financing, efficiency, and technology gaps. However, a lack of bankable projects is a major hurdle. This publication suggests one possible innovative financing approach. The Green Finance Catalyzing Facility (GFCF) proposes a blended finance framework for governments and development entities to better leverage development funds for risk mitigation, generate a pipeline of bankable green infrastructure projects, and directly catalyze private finance. The GFCF provides useful inputs for the current debate on mainstreaming green finance into country financial systems.

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    catalyzing​-green​-finance.pdf (9 MB)
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  • Moving from information dissemination to community participation in forest landscapes: How development organizations in Asia and the Pacific are using participatory development communication approaches

    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused o

    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused on the dissemination of technical information to end-users who were expected to adopt them. Development practitioners were trying to ‘push’ their products on communities in order to receive community commitment to their development initiatives. Further, when planning communication strategies, many projects tend to take a very broad problem as a starting point (a declining forest, for example) and then move right into planning communication activities (for example, information sessions, awareness campaigns). The result is that the target is often missed and despite all the activities undertaken the problem remains unaddressed. Participatory development communication (PDC) takes a different approach. It suggests a shift in focus from informing people with a view to changing their behaviours or attitudes to facilitating exchanges between various stakeholders. These exchanges help the stakeholders to address a common problem or implement a joint development initiative. PDC is a systematic process using participatory techniques and communication media (such as radio, newspapers, TV, social media) to empower communities to participate in the development process, enable them to take the lead on its activities and use the learning generated to improve their livelihoods. The purpose of PDC is to seek sustainable social change by engaging and empowering relevant stakeholders (FAO, 2014). At the heart of PDC and other participatory research and development approaches is people’s meaningful participation and empowerment. This paper offers a brief overview of the basic and practical steps involved in the PDC process to assist sustainable forest practitioners and communication officers to adopt a PDC approach in their work. The paper then reviews the PDC components of six case studies promoting sustainable forest management in Asia and the Pacific. Each project was conducted in 2015–16 and included a primary objective of influencing ‘community awareness and attitudes’ towards sustainable forest management. While the case studies do not offer examples of the complete PDC approach, they highlight how sustainable forest management projects in the Asia-Pacific region are moving away from one-way information dissemination toward using two-way communication approaches and tools to promote community participation in forest decision-making. The case studies were developed following a joint RECOFTC and FAO workshop on 12–15 May 2015 to improve the capacities of forestry communication officers from governments and NGOs to plan, develop and facilitate participatory development processes in building and implementing more effective communication strategies. Workshop participants are members of the Asia-Pacific Forest Communication Network (APFCN).

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    participatory​_development​_communcation​_case​_studies​_08​_2017​_en.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Regional Road Map for Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific

    At the global level in 2015 countries set in motion the most far reaching and ambitious development agenda of our time,

    At the global level in 2015 countries set in motion the most far reaching and ambitious development agenda of our time, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In Asia and the Pacific, countries have already begun translating this ambitious agenda into action and many have already set up the national architecture for coordinating and promoting the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, the policy transformations required to put countries on track to achieve the SDGs have yet to take shape across this or any other region. Business as usual policies and investments are locking countries into unsustainable pathways that will create a gap between ambition and action.

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    Final SDG Roadmap​_Updated Logo.pdf (631 KB)
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  • Statistical Yearbook for Asia and the Pacific 2016: SDG Baseline Report

    The report presents the SDG baseline for the Asia and the Pacific both at the regional and sub-regional levels for selec

    The report presents the SDG baseline for the Asia and the Pacific both at the regional and sub-regional levels for selected targets of each SDG. The main objective of the Report is to highlight critical gaps and challenges of the region in achieving the SDGs and inform inter-governmental and inter-agency regional decision making in support of implementing the 2030 development agenda in the region.

    The report is organized in three parts:

    • Part I provides a regional snapshot of progress since 2000 (starting of the MDGs) and acceleration that is required in order for the region to achieve the 16 goals by 2030. This is further elaborated in a dashboard across the target areas, highlighting the size of the gaps between a “business-as-usual” scenario and the required pace of progress by 2030.
    • Part II then sets out a more detailed, goal by goal baseline for the region for selected targets, drawing on the latest data available on the proposed global indicators as well as supplementary statistical information.
    • Part III concludes by highlighting key findings of the baseline report and the regional vision for transforming official statistics to tackle challenges in meeting the statistics and data requirements for the follow-up and review of the 2030 agenda. It also emphasize critical role of data disaggregation for achieving the leave-no-one-behind ambition of the SDGs.

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    ESCAP​_SYB2016​_SDG​_baseline​_report.pdf (28 MB)
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  • A Region at Risk: The Human Dimensions of Climate Change in Asia and the Pacific

    Recent regional climate change projections have consequences for human systems, particularly for developing countri

    Recent regional climate change projections have consequences for human systems, particularly for developing countries in Asia and the Pacific.

    Asia and the Pacific continues to be exposed to climate change impacts. Home to the majority of the world’s poor, the population of the region is particularly vulnerable to those impacts. Unabated warming could largely diminish previous achievements of economic development and improvements, putting the future of the region at risk.

    The report discusses the most recent projections pertaining to climate change and climate change impacts in Asia and the Pacific, and the consequences of these changes to human systems, particularly for developing countries. It also highlights gaps in the existing knowledge and identifies avenues for continued research.

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    region​-risk​-climate​-change.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Green Finance Progress Report 2017

    The G20 Green Finance Synthesis Report adopted at the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou in September 2016 set out seven opt

    The G20 Green Finance Synthesis Report adopted at the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou in September 2016 set out seven options identified by the G20 Green Finance Study Group (GFSG) to accelerate the mobilization of green finance. This paper highlights some of the progress made against these seven options in G20 members and internationally since June 2016. Progress described is illustrative and non-exhaustive, drawing on voluntary contributions from GFSG members and a broader review of global trends. While not comprehensive, it provides a useful summary of many of the key developments and the overall progress made to mobilize private capital for green investment.

    Progress observed and reported in this paper indicates that momentum is growing in mainstreaming green finance into the architecture and practice of financial and capital markets. This momentum has directly resulted in an increased mobilization of green finance. UN Environment tracks a range of green finance measures including, for example, green financing mobilized, policies, regulations, standards, guidelines, principles and fiscal incentives. This report shows that more measures related to green finance have been introduced since June 2016 compared with any other one-year period since 2000.

    Green Finance Progress Report 2017.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Mekong Power Shift: Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector

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  • Lessons from ADB Transport Projects: Moving Goods, Connecting People, and Disseminating Knowledge

    From in-country to cross-country connections, whether by land, air, or water, transport is a key ingredient that en

    From in-country to cross-country connections, whether by land, air, or water, transport is a key ingredient that enables nations to achieve economic and social development goals.

    ADB has been working with developing member countries to improve roads, airports, waterways, and other transport infrastructures to provide people with better access to economic opportunities, public services, domestic and international markets. This publication shares 20 case stories bearing practical knowledge and lessons for transport projects across Asia and the Pacific region under different socioeconomic and political situations.

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    lessons​-transport​-projects.pdf (8 MB)
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  • Business for Sustainable Landscapes

    This report draws widely from the diverse experience of landscape partnerships to analyze the challenges and opportuniti

    This report draws widely from the diverse experience of landscape partnerships to analyze the challenges and opportunities for businesses and their partners, and lays out critical actions needed by businesses themselves, and by financial institutions, governments and landscape programs, to improve the effectiveness of landscape partnerships and replicate the approach in many more places.

    Business​-for​-Sustainable​-Landscapes​-An​-Action​-Agenda​-for​-Sustainable​-Development​-May​-2017.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Green Technology Choices: The Environmental and Resource Implications of Low-Carbon Technologies

    Big wins for human health, natural resources in switch to energy efficiency

    Big wins for human health, natural resources in switch to energy efficiency

    • Low-carbon technologies aid clean air, save water and cut land use
    • 25 billion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions and 17 million tonnes of particulates a year could be avoided through low-carbon and energy efficiency technologies
    report​_green​_technology​_choices​-final​-2​_web​_090517.pdf (5 MB)
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  • UN Environment's Freshwater Strategy 2017-2021

    This document describes UN Environment’s five-year Freshwater Strategy from 2017 to 2021. As a living document, it

    This document describes UN Environment’s five-year Freshwater Strategy from 2017 to 2021. As a living document, it is intended to guide work related to freshwater across UN Environment’s divisions, sub-programmes and regional offices, as well as interactions with governments and partners at national, regional and global levels. The Freshwater Strategy supports the implementation of UN Environment’s Medium-Term Strategy and Programme of Work adopted by universal United Nations (UN) membership through the UN Environment Assembly. Coming at a critical time for freshwater in general, and the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular, this strategy aims to unlock the potential of integrated collaboration and spur leadership on freshwater issues globally.

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    UNEP​-full​_report​-170502.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific: 50 Years of The Asian Development Bank

    This book is a history of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a multilateral development bank established 50 years ago to

    This book is a history of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a multilateral development bank established 50 years ago to serve Asia and the Pacific.

    Focusing on the region’s economic development, the evolution of the international development agenda, and the story of ADB itself, Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific raises several key questions: What are the outstanding features of regional development to which ADB had to respond? How has the bank grown and evolved in changing circumstances? How did ADB’s successive leaders promote reforms while preserving continuity with the efforts of their predecessors? ADB has played an important role in the transformation of Asia and the Pacific over the past 50 years. As ADB continues to evolve and adapt to the region’s changing development landscape, the experiences highlighted in this book can provide valuable insight on how best to serve Asia and the Pacific in the future.

    50years​-adb.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Financing Asian Irrigation: Choices Before Us

    By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Improved irrigation productivity and g

    By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Improved irrigation productivity and greater financial sustainability are critical.

    Water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in the Asia Pacific region. By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Climate change and rapid population growth will place new pressures on already scarce water resources. Improved irrigation productivity—more crop per drop—and greater financial sustainability are critical. Estimates for the Asian region place a $12.31 billion annual investment required for irrigation between 2005 and 2013.

    This publication looks into how the Asia and Pacific region is addressing the need to sustainably fund large-scale, publicly owned and managed surface irrigation and drainage systems.

    financing​-asian​-immigration.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Risk Financing for Rural Climate Resilience in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    This report presents the findings of a climate risk financing study conducted by the GMS Core Environment Program in 28

    This report presents the findings of a climate risk financing study conducted by the GMS Core Environment Program in 28 rural communities in Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, and Viet Nam. It provides an overview of the frequency and severity of climate-related disasters for the communities, the impact of these on rural livelihoods, and how local people currently manage climate risks. The report also explores what climate risk financing strategies could be applied in such communities, including the potential costs and benefits.

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    risk​-financing​-rural​-climate​-resilience​-gms.pdf (4 MB)
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  • SEI Annual Report 2016

    SEI Annual Report 2016

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  • Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2017: Transcending the Middle-Income Challenge

    Developing Asia has continued to perform well, even as recovery in the major industrial economies remains weak. The regi

    Developing Asia has continued to perform well, even as recovery in the major industrial economies remains weak. The region is forecast to expand by 5.7% in 2017 and 2018, nearly the 5.8% growth achieved in 2016.

    Decades of rapid growth transformed developing Asia from a low-income region to middle income. Sustaining growth to power the transition to high income will depend on much greater improvement in productivity. Innovation, human capital, and infrastructure are the three pillars of productivity growth. Supportive institutions and policies, underpinned by macroeconomic stability, can strengthen all three pillars. Asia’s dynamic track record suggests that attaining high income status, while challenging, is achievable.

    ado​-2017.pdf (7 MB)
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  • Agroforestry in rice production landscapes in Southeast Asia: a practical manual

    This publication represents an output of work conducted on trees outside forests (TOF) as part of Regional Rice Initiati

    This publication represents an output of work conducted on trees outside forests (TOF) as part of Regional Rice Initiative (RRI) Phase 2. It provides practical information on the status, benefits and techniques related the use of TOF in rice production landscapes in Southeast Asia. The manual describes the main rice-based farming systems in Southeast Asia, discusses the potential of agroforestry in enhancing the livelihood of smallholder farmers in rice growing areas in Southeast Asia, and gives an overview of traditional and innovative practices integrating trees in rice-based farms and landscapes. The manual also provides practical information to guide the planning, design and management of agroforestry in rice production systems in Southeast Asia, including case studies from several countries in the region.

    a​-i7137e.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Guidelines on Public Participation in EIA in the Mekong Region

    The Guidelines on Public Participation in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in the Mekong Region have been developed

    The Guidelines on Public Participation in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in the Mekong Region have been developed to address the shared concern for increasing meaningful public participation in development planning, in the context of increasing investment projects across the Mekong region. The Guidelines are intended to help stimulate more effective practices in public participation. These Guidelines are also playing an important role in informing the development of national level guidelines on public participation in EIA. This document is intended as a living resource and it is hoped that it will inspire the continued strengthening of EIA policies and practices in each country and across the region, as well as to advance greater regional collaboration and harmonization among Mekong and ASEAN nations.

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    Regional EIA Guidelines​-Final.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Earth Observation for a Transforming Asia and Pacific

    Satellite-based environmental information are innovative solutions that can provide new ways for ADB to serve and addres

    Satellite-based environmental information are innovative solutions that can provide new ways for ADB to serve and address development challenges.

    This report summarizes results of the initiative Earth Observation for a Transforming Asia and Pacific (EOTAP), that brought together the European Space Agency (ESA) and ADB to promote and demonstrate satellite Earth Observation in support of ADB’s investments in its developing member countries (DMCs).

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    earth​-observation​-asia​-pacific.pdf (13 MB)
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  • Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity

    In Asia and the Pacific extreme income poverty remains widespread. This analysis of trends and highlighted good practice

    In Asia and the Pacific extreme income poverty remains widespread. This analysis of trends and highlighted good practices provides useful input into regional and global dialogues.

    This report is produced under a renewed partnership between United Nations (ESCAP), ADB, and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to support national and regional efforts to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It explores five megatrends that will determine whether everyone will be able to thrive and fulfill their expectations for a better life in the future: regional economic cooperation and integration; rural–urban transitions; demographic changes; ICT access and connectivity; and demand for natural resources.

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    eradicating​-poverty​-asia​-pacific.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Resource Efficiency: Potential and Economic Implications

    As our population continues to grow, so does the pressure on our finite and fragile resources. Yet that threat can be tu

    As our population continues to grow, so does the pressure on our finite and fragile resources. Yet that threat can be turned into an opportunity to deliver the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the massive potential of using increased efficiency as a costeffective way to protect resources, tackle climate change and reduce our environmental footprint, while boosting economic growth, employment and development.

    resource​_efficiency​_report​_march​_2017​_web​_res.pdf (22 MB)
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  • BASELINE SURVEY REPORT: Enhancing Competitiveness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises In The Southern Economic Corridor of ASEAN Mekong Sub-Region (AMS)

    This is the baseline survey made for the project “Enhancing Competitiveness of Small and Medium- sized Enterprises

    This is the baseline survey made for the project “Enhancing Competitiveness of Small and Medium- sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the Southern Economic Corridor (SEC) of ASEAN Mekong Sub region (AMS)” for the period 2016 – 2018. The Project is supported by the Government of Japan through Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund (JAIF) and covers a wide geographical area of 19 provinces in the SEC. With capacity development programs provided to local SMEs, CCIs, government officials and stakeholders, the project is about to (i) formulate SME clusters and integrate them into the regional value chains; (ii) to facilitate trade and investment promotions for the SME clusters though a number of trade and investment promotion events as well as SME database developments; and (iii) strengthen the business development services (BDS) providers to improve the coverage and quality of BDS services available to the target SME clusters.

    JAIF​-SEC​_Baseline​_Survey​_Report​_​-​_Final.pdf (2 MB)
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  • The Long Road Ahead: Status Report on the Implementation of the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangements on Professional Services

    Over the past decade, ASEAN has signed Mutual Recognition Arrangements (MRAs) in seven occupations, all designed to faci

    Over the past decade, ASEAN has signed Mutual Recognition Arrangements (MRAs) in seven occupations, all designed to facilitate professional mobility within the region.

    MRAs are not easy to operationalize, however. Despite progress in key areas, Member States face complex challenges as they move toward full implementation. This report is the latest in a project by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) to improve understanding of the barriers to the free movement of professionals within ASEAN and to support the development of strategies to overcome these hurdles. The report draws on the insights of nearly 400 ASEAN and Member State officials, private-sector employers, training directors, and others who participated in focus group discussions, meetings, and surveys convened by ADB and MPI.

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    long​-road​-ahead.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Tourism Sector Assessment, Strategy, and Road Map for Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar, and Viet Nam (2016-2018)

    This report documents tourism sector investment priorities of ADB and the governments of Cambodia, the Lao People&r

    This report documents tourism sector investment priorities of ADB and the governments of Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, and Viet Nam.

    The assessment highlights sector performance, priority development constraints, government plans and strategies, past ADB support and experience, and other development partner support. It provides sector background information for ADB's investment and technical assistance operations and will be updated as strategic developments and program changes are needed.

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    clmv​-tourism​-sector​-assessment.pdf (1 MB)
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  • Safeguarding the Rights of Asian Migrant Workers from Home to the Workplace

    This report points to the growing number of labor migrants in Asia and examines the policy question of how to best safeg

    This report points to the growing number of labor migrants in Asia and examines the policy question of how to best safeguard their rights. Governments and stakeholders in both origin and destination countries have largely recognized their mutual interest in safeguarding labor migrants. Multilateral frameworks have also put this in focus, with safe and orderly migration seen as important. This report examines some of the key policy questions in protecting migrant workers, including how to promote fair recruitment of less-skilled workers, and how to address vulnerable groups such as irregular migrants and domestic workers.

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    adbi​-safeguarding​-rights​-asian​-migrant​-workers.pdf (4 MB)
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  • The World of Organic Agriculture 2017

  • Social forestry and climate change in the ASEAN region

    This report is the third in a series of reports on the status of social forestry and its role in climate change mitigati

    This report is the third in a series of reports on the status of social forestry and its role in climate change mitigation and adaptation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. An initial baseline report was published in 2011 providing a regional overview for 2010 and the fist situational analysis was published in 2014, presenting the status in 2013. This analysis report, the second status update, presents the most up-to-date government data available on forests, social forestry and climate change at national and regional levels, and identifis key changes and developments during the last three years. The main focus of the report is the eight ASEAN countries with government-supported social forestry programmes, namely Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam.

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    social​_forestry​_and​_climate​_change​_in​_the​_asean​_region​_2017​_01​_en.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Energy Storage in Grids with High Penetration of Variable Generation

    With increased emphasis on reducing emissions from the power sector, grid-level energy storage can enable larger penetra

    With increased emphasis on reducing emissions from the power sector, grid-level energy storage can enable larger penetration of renewable energy into the grid.

    Grid-level energy storage is likely to dominate the conversation in the power industry in the coming years, just like renewable energy dominated the conversation in the past 2 decades. This report targets investors, developers, utility planners, power sector policy makers, and readers who wish to understand the role energy storage is likely to play in the smart grid of the future. For developing countries, the report provides an introduction to the necessary technical background on energy storage, the role it is likely to play as penetration of renewable energy increases in the grid, and the policy prescriptions to realize the wide range of benefits of energy storage.

    Click here for more detail.

    energy​-storage​-grids.pdf (768 KB)
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  • FAO and the SDGs

    On 25 September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development &n

    On 25 September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – including 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets – committing the international community to end poverty and hunger and achieve sustainable development between 2016 and 2030. Six months later, a global indicator framework for the SDGs – comprising 230 indicators - was identified to monitor the 169 targets and track progress, becoming the foundation of the SDGs’ accountability structure. The number of indicators - four times greater than for the MDGs - represents an immense challenge for countries. FAO - proposed ‘custodian’ UN agency for 21 SDG indicators and a contributing agency for six more – can assist countries in meeting the new monitoring challenges. This publication presents FAO’s work in developing and strengthening indicators that measure food, agriculture and the sustainable use of natural resources, shining a light on the 21 indicators of FAO custodianship. It describes how the organization can support countries track progress and make the connection between monitoring and policymaking to achieve the SDGs.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6919e.pdf (2 MB)
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  • FAO's strategic work to enable inclusive and efficient agricultural and food systems

    FAO helps to build safe and efficient food systems that support smallholder agriculture. In order for developing countri

    FAO helps to build safe and efficient food systems that support smallholder agriculture. In order for developing countries to benefit from globalization and commercialization, FAO assists countries in building the capacity to access international markets, meeting international standards for food safety and hygiene and improving processes along entire value chains.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6627e.pdf (10 MB)
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  • Strategic work of FAO for Sustainable Food and Agriculture

    FAO promotes the transition to sustainable and climate-resilient agricultural policies and governance mechanisms, workin

    FAO promotes the transition to sustainable and climate-resilient agricultural policies and governance mechanisms, working with countries on reviewing their policies and investment strategies and helping them align their policies and programmes in support of implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as the Paris Agreement on climate change.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6488e.pdf (9 MB)
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  • Public Policy Guidelines for Integrated Landscape Management

    National and sub-national policies that create the enabling conditions for integrated landscape management still need to

    National and sub-national policies that create the enabling conditions for integrated landscape management still need to be put in place in most areas of the world. Thankfully, policymakers have a large set of tools at their disposal, many of which are very low or no-cost. Further, there are simple steps that can be taken right away by individual agencies or localities to put ILM-friendly policy implementation on the horizon.

    Public​-Policy​-Guidelines​-for​-ILM​-January​-2017​-Final.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Investing in ASEAN 2017

    Since its formation, ASEAN has seen an underdeveloped region grow into one of the most dynamic drivers of today’s

    Since its formation, ASEAN has seen an underdeveloped region grow into one of the most dynamic drivers of today’s global economy. As it marks its fiftieth anniversary in 2017, the Association’s ten member countries are a significant focus of international investment as Southeast Asia’s success story continues, following the formation of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

    Investing​-in​-ASEAN​-2017​-.pdf (5 MB)
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  • UNDP's Response to El Nino and La Nina: From recurring crisis to resilience

    The 2015-2016 El Niño phenomenon has been one of the strongest on record, affecting deeply the lives and liveliho

    The 2015-2016 El Niño phenomenon has been one of the strongest on record, affecting deeply the lives and livelihoods of more than 60 million people across 40 countries. It has devastated crops and killed livestock, in some cases dried up water-sources in others caused massive flooding, driven up malnutrition rates, increased disease outbreaks and caused significant migration.

    Click here for more detail.

    El Niño UNDP Response.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Waste Management in Myanmar: Current Status, Key Challenges and Recommendations for National and City Waste Management Strategies

    This policy report reviews the current status of waste management in Myanmar and confirms that it remains at a prelimina

    This policy report reviews the current status of waste management in Myanmar and confirms that it remains at a preliminary stage, attributed to challenges at both the national and city levels resulting from a range of technical, social, economic and institutional constraints. Accordingly, the overall guidance of this report is the need for Myanmar to develop a national waste management strategy to serve as a principal framework for waste policies and practices across the country; such a strategy should be designed with a view towards supporting city-level strategies and actions, and focus on the piloting and execution of concrete actions led by Township and City Development Committees. In order to ensure that these national and city waste management strategies are implemented in a coordinated, cost-effective and efficient manner, the report concludes by providing a number of policy recommendations.

    Click here for more detail.

    POLICY REPORT​_​_Myanmar.final​_.2017.01.31rev.pdf (7 MB)
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  • Guide for planning, construction and maintenance of forest roads

    The first part of the Manual introduces the main steps of forest road network planning and gives guidance on road constr

    The first part of the Manual introduces the main steps of forest road network planning and gives guidance on road construction under different site conditions. It demonstrates good practices to minimize the area used for building purposes, to keep the environmental impact as low as possible and to maintain forest productivity. It describes the machinery suitable for the different construction phases and compares the advantages of machine types. The second part of the Manual introduces the goals and best practices of regular forest road maintenance which is a key operation that enables multi-purpose use of forests. It gives an overview on the main causes of forest road degradation and explains the different maintenance regimes and maintenance activities.

    a​-i7051e.pdf (18 MB)
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  • 2016 Mekong Business Initiative (MBI) Annual Report

    The Australian Government’s Mekong Business Initiative (MBI) was launched in early 2015 to catalyze private sector

    The Australian Government’s Mekong Business Initiative (MBI) was launched in early 2015 to catalyze private sector-led innovation and growth in the emerging Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) market. It is an advisory facility financed jointly by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Government of Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), for a total of $10.5 million. MBI, which is managed by ADB, focuses on Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Myanmar, and Vietnam (collectively–CLMV) because these countries are linked geographically; they have similar natural resources and agrarian economies (although Vietnam is more industrialized); and they have strong potential for economic growth but need to improve the environment for private enterprise and innovation to catch up with their ASEAN counterparts.

    To achieve MBI’s expected outcome of an improved business enabling environment for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), MBI carries out its activities through subprojects under three pillars: improved public-private dialogue on private sector development (PSD) policies and regulations, a more robust financing environment, and a more dynamic ecosystem for innovation.

    Click here for more detial.

    2016​-MBI​-Annual​-report.pdf (10 MB)
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  • Myanmar: Energy Assessment, Strategy, and Road Map

    This assessment highlights Myanmar’s energy sector performance, major development constraints, government plans, a

    This assessment highlights Myanmar’s energy sector performance, major development constraints, government plans, and future ADB support strategy.

    Click here for detial report.

    mya​-energy​-sector​-assessment.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Myanmar's Electricity Vision

    This comprehensive study proves that renewable energy for Myanmar is not only technically feasible but also economically

    This comprehensive study proves that renewable energy for Myanmar is not only technically feasible but also economically feasible compared to the so-called “cheap” traditional technologies. The development of Myanmar’s power sector will require multi-billion dollar investment over the next three decades and our analysis shows that a diverse mix of renewable energy, in combination with energy efficiency measures, will be the best solution for the sustainable power development of Myanmar.

    Click here for more detail.

    myanmar​_s​_electricity​_vision​_final​_web.pdf (9 MB)
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  • Transboundary Lakes and Reservoirs: Status and Future Trends (Volume 2)

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  • Asian Economic Integration Report 2016

    With the continued anemic global economic recovery, trade growth in Asia and the Pacific decelerated in 2015, falling fu

    With the continued anemic global economic recovery, trade growth in Asia and the Pacific decelerated in 2015, falling further behind growth in gross domestic product.

    Click here for detial report.

    AsianEconomicIntegrationReport​-2016​-mainreport.pdf (4 MB) AsianEconomicIntegrationReport​-2016​-highlights.pdf (1 MB)
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  • Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate: Strategy Note on Sustainable Energy

    UNDP's Energy Strategy, 2017-2021 

    UNDP's Energy Strategy, 2017-2021 

    UNDP’s Sustainable Energy Strategy Note, 2017-2021: Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate articulates – for the first time – UNDP’s vision, mission, approach, guiding principles, and focus in the area of sustainable energy. It also highlights the critical role that sustainable energy plays in advancing major outcomes from post-2015 global processes including the SDGs, the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the New Urban Agenda.

    Click here for more detail.

    UNDP Energy Strategy 2017​-2021.pdf (3 MB)
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  • The Rise Of Environmental Crime: A Growing Threat To Natural Resources, Peace, Development and Security

    The growth rate of these crimes is astonishing. The reportthat follows reveals for the first time that this new area ofc

    The growth rate of these crimes is astonishing. The reportthat follows reveals for the first time that this new area ofcriminality has diversified and skyrocketed to become theworld’s fourth largest crime sector in a few decades, growingat 2-3 times the pace of the global economy. INTERPOL andUNEP now estimate that natural resources worth as much asUSD 91 billion to USD 258 billion annually are being stolenby criminals, depriving countries of future revenues anddevelopment opportunities.

    The​_rise​_of​_environmental​_crime​_​_A​_growing​_threat​_to​_natural​_resources​_peace,​_development​_and​_security​-2016environmental​_crimes.pdf.pdf (9 MB)
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  • State of the World's Forests 2016 - Forests and agriculture: land-use challenges and opportunities

    Forests and trees support sustainable agriculture. They stabilize soils and climate, regulate water flows, give shade an

    Forests and trees support sustainable agriculture. They stabilize soils and climate, regulate water flows, give shade and shelter, and provide a habitat for pollinators and the natural predators of agricultural pests. They also contribute to the food security of hundreds of millions of people, for whom they are important sources of food, energy and income. Yet, agriculture remains the major driver of deforestation globally, and agricultural, forestry and land policies are often at odds. The State of the World’s Forests (SOFO) 2016 shows that it is possible to increase agricultural productivity and food security while halting or even reversing deforestation, highlighting the successful efforts of Costa Rica, Chile, the Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Tunisia and Viet Nam. Integrated land-use planning is the key to balancing land uses, underpinned by the right policy instruments to promote both sustainable forests and agriculture.

    SOFO2016​_FAO.pdf (5 MB)
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  • The State of Food and Agriculture 2016 (SOFA): Climate change, agriculture and food security

    The 2016 SOFA report presents evidence on today and tomorrow’s impact of climate change on agriculture and food sy

    The 2016 SOFA report presents evidence on today and tomorrow’s impact of climate change on agriculture and food systems. The report assesses the options to make agriculture and food systems resilient to climate change impacts, while minimizing environmental impacts. It shows that making agriculture and food systems sustainable is both economically and technically feasible. However barriers to the adoption of appropriate technologies and management practices will have to be lowered, especially for smallholder farmers and women farmers amongst them. Likewise, an overhaul is needed of agricultural and food policies to shift incentives in favour of investments, worldwide, in sustainable technologies and practices.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6030e​_3.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity: Good Practices for Insitu and On-Farm Conservation

    Farmers have developed a range of agricultural practices to sustainably use and maintain a wide diversity of crop specie

    Farmers have developed a range of agricultural practices to sustainably use and maintain a wide diversity of crop species in many parts of the world. This book documents good practices innovated by farmers and collects key reviews on good practices from global experts, not only from the case study countries but also from Brazil, China and other parts of Asia and Latin America.

    A good practice for diversity is defined as a system, organization or process that, over time and space, maintains, enhances and creates crop genetic diversity, and ensures its availability to and from farmers and other users. Drawing on experiences from a UNEP-GEF project on "Conservation and Sustainable Use of Wild and Cultivated Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity for Promoting Livelihoods, Food Security and Ecosystem Services", with case studies from India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, the authors show how methods for identifying good practices are still evolving and challenges in scaling-up remain. They identify key principles effective as a strategy for mainstreaming good practice into development efforts. Few books draw principles and lessons learned from good practices. This book fills this gap by combining good practices from the research project on tropical fruit trees with chapters from external experts to broaden its scope and relevance.

    Tropical​_Fruit​_Tree​_Diversity.pdf (8 MB)
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  • Nature-Based Solutions for Building Resilience in Towns and Cities: Case Studies from the Greater Mekong Subregion

    Green infrastructure can play a significant role in offsetting losses from climate-related disasters and contribute to b

    Green infrastructure can play a significant role in offsetting losses from climate-related disasters and contribute to building resilience through rehabilitation and expansion of natural ecosystems within built areas.

    Urban populations are projected to increase from 54% to 66% of the global population by 2050, with close to 90% of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. Cities and towns—a growing source of greenhouse gas emissions—will need to address challenges posed by climate change. A nature-based approach in identifying climate change vulnerabilities and developing relevant adaptation options was conducted in three towns of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS).

    Working with local governments, nongovernment organizations, women’s groups, and professional associations, town-wide adaptation measures were defined by overlaying climate change projections on town plans and zoning schemes for strategic infrastructure. This publication captures valuable experience and lessons from the project.

    nature​-based​-solutions.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Guidance Note | Municipal Solid Waste Management in Crisis and Post-Crisis Setting

    This guidance note aims to support Government counterparts and strengthen UNDP Country Offices’ and implementing p

    This guidance note aims to support Government counterparts and strengthen UNDP Country Offices’ and implementing partners’ capacities to plan, design and implement projects for municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in crisis or post-crisis settings, as part of UNDP’s early recovery response.

    The Guidance Note focuses in particular on livelihoods recovery and local government service delivery. It is assumed that readers do not have extensive experience in the area of MSWM. The guidance note is intended to inform UNDP Country Offices and implementing partners on the type of programmes UNDP could support in the area of MSWM in an early recovery setting, and provide information on how to plan, design and implement such projects.

    Click here for more detail.

    GuidanceNote​_Solid​_Waste​_Management.pdf (2 MB)
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  • From MDGs to Sustainable Development For All: Lessons from 15 Years of Practice

    In 2015, world leaders set out to defy the odds, committing themselves to achieve 17 ambitious and far-reaching Sustaina

    In 2015, world leaders set out to defy the odds, committing themselves to achieve 17 ambitious and far-reaching Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. This was not the first time the world had attempted to raise the trajectory of human progress by employing Global Goals. In 2000, world leaders blazed a trail by adopting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs were the first attempt to use Global Goals to capture and advance the shared interest we all have, in a more just, peaceful and prosperous world.

    Click here for more detail.

    From the MDGs to SD4All.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs

    This UNDP-World Bank Report pulls together the main lessons learned from the MDG Reviews for the UN system and for its e

    This UNDP-World Bank Report pulls together the main lessons learned from the MDG Reviews for the UN system and for its engagement at the country level, which took place at the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB). The Reviews, which brought together UN and World Bank Group staff, systematically identified the country situation, the bottlenecks to MDG attainment, and potential solutions to be implemented. Since many MDGs have been absorbed into the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), many of the observations and solutions provided could prove useful to the implementation of the SDGs.

    Click here for more detail.

    Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Advancing nationally determined contributions (NDCs) through climate-friendly refrigeration and air-conditioning

     At the 28th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (MP) in October 2016 in Kigali, parties agreed to phas

     At the 28th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (MP) in October 2016 in Kigali, parties agreed to phase down hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) emissions over the next three decades, thereby building a fundamental pillar to achieving the ultimate goal set out in the Paris Agreement about a year earlier. According to an analysis by G. Velders et al (2016), the Kigali Amendment will avoid nearly 90 per cent of the temperature increase that HFCs could have caused.

    The following guidance assists policymakers to design national mitigation strategies for their refrigeration, air conditioning and foam (RAC&F) sector to meet the increasing ambition levels expected in revised NDCs. By aligning efforts taken under the two relevant international regimes, the UNFCCC and the Montreal Protocol, the RAC&F sector can make a significant contribution towards reaching the 2°C target, or even better, the enhanced 1,5°C target.

    giz​_2016​_advancing​_ndcs​_through​_climate​_friendly​_refrigeration.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Study On Market & Value Chain Mapping in the Southern Economic Corridor and Southern Coastal Corridor of the Greater Mekong Subregion

    Study of SME Cluster Value Chain of 19 Provinces along the SouthernEconomic Corridor and Southern Coastal Corridor of th

    Study of SME Cluster Value Chain of 19 Provinces along the SouthernEconomic Corridor and Southern Coastal Corridor of the Greater Mekong Subregion.

    Study​_on​_Market​_and​_Value​_Chain​_Mapping.pdf (11 MB)
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  • Integrated systems research for sustainable smallholder agriculture in the Central Mekong

    This book summarizes the achievements as well as some of the challenges faced while implementing integrated systems rese

    This book summarizes the achievements as well as some of the challenges faced while implementing integrated systems research to support the sustainable development of smallholder farming in the uplands of the Mekong region. It describes how CGIAR centres and national and local partners collaborated to test options to increase farm productivity in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam, and how field trials in Xishuangbanna, China; Son La, Viet Nam; and, Luang Prabang, Laos, showed that agroforestry and home-based vegetable gardens, among other interventions, could contribute to reduced land degradation and erosion. Efforts were also made to address the marginalization of ethnic minority farmers from agricultural and rural development. The book also discusses lessons learned in the research, including what did not work and possible reasons for that. Integrated systems research often requires ‘doing things differently’, which can lead to resistance among those involved. Also, implementing processes such as establishing and working together through multi-stakeholder platforms, was challenging and not always easy. However, some interesting new partnerships have emerged from this experience.

    Humidtropics​_Raneri.pdf (4 MB)
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  • ASEAN Strategic Plan for Culture and Arts 2016-2025

    One of the goals of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) Blueprint is to forge solidarity and unity in the&nbs

    One of the goals of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) Blueprint is to forge solidarity and unity in the ASEAN region by building a common identity that supports greater understanding and mutual respect among the peoples of the ASEAN region. The ASCC Blueprint has effectively guided the culture sector’s initiatives, which “are deemed highly relevant in achieving the strategic objective of creating a sense of belonging, of consolidating unity in diversity, and of deepening mutual understanding among the ASEAN Member States”. Through the targets set by the ASCC Blueprint, the culture sector has likewise pushed for the conservation, preservation and safeguarding of the ASEAN community’s cultural heritage.

    19.​-October​-2016​-ASEAN​-Strategic​-Plan​-for​-Culture​-and​-Arts​-2016​-2025.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Asian Development Outlook 2016 Update: Meeting the Low-Carbon Growth Challenge

    Growth has held up in developing Asia despite a difficult external environment. The region is expected to grow steadily

    Growth has held up in developing Asia despite a difficult external environment. The region is expected to grow steadily at 5.7% in 2016 and 2017, the forecasts in this Update unchanged from Asian Development Outlook 2016.

    Follow the link for more detial.

    ado2016​-update.pdf (6 MB) ado2016​-update​-highlights.pdf (793 KB)
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  • Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity 2025

    Connectivity in ASEAN encompasses the physical (e.g., transport, ICT, and energy), institutional (e.g., trade, inve

    Connectivity in ASEAN encompasses the physical (e.g., transport, ICT, and energy), institutional (e.g., trade, investment, and services liberalisation), and people-to-people linkages (e.g., education, culture, and tourism) that are the foundational supportive means to achieving the economic, political-security, and socio-cultural pillars of an integrated ASEAN Community.

    Master​-Plan​-on​-ASEAN​-Connectivity​-20251.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Mekong Development Report 2016

    Launched in 1998, the East-West Economic Corridor—encompassing the less developed provinces of Myanmar, Lao PDR, T

    Launched in 1998, the East-West Economic Corridor—encompassing the less developed provinces of Myanmar, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Vietnam—is one of the flagship initiatives of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) in order to improve the economic situation of these areas. Although countries in the EWEC have recently experienced sheer economic growth, unfortunately this growth is unbalanced with the industrial sector growing faster than the agricultural sector, contributing to worsening income inequality. This problem needs to be addressed and tackled urgently as the majority of population depends largely on agriculture, which is declining in its importance. Taken this issue into account, this comprehensive document focuses on three specific agricultural value chains in three target provinces - a rice value chain in Khammouane province of Lao PDR, a coffee value chain in Quang Tri province of Vietnam, and a maize value chain in Kayin State of Myanmar – in order to address prospects and constraints for value chain development, examine costs and margin for each actor in the value chain, and suggest actions to minimize the constraints and maximize the prospects.

    Mekong​_Development​_Report​_r261016.pdf (12 MB)
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  • Myanmar Environmental Policies and Legislation

    Myanmar Environmental Policies and Legislation are available at:

    Myanmar Environmental Policies and Legislation are available at:

          -Myanmar Parliament website

          -Mekong Law Center website

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  • Food Systems and Natural Resources

    Food systems are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic global commitment to eradicate

    Food systems are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic global commitment to eradicate poverty and hunger while ensuring healthy, prosperous and fulfilling lives. The food we grow, produce, consume, trade, transport, store and sell is the essential connecting thread between people, prosperity, and planet. We therefore need ‘resource-smart’ food systems. Food systems crucially depend on natural resources: land, soil, water, terrestrial and marine biodiversity, minerals (essential nutrients for crops and animals) and fossil fuels. The use of these natural resources goes beyond primary food production, e.g. fresh water for processing and biomass for packaging or cooking. If we want ensure all people have safe and nutritious food, in appropriate amounts, these natural resources need to be managed sustainably and used efficiently, while reducing environmental impacts. The food sector is globally the dominant user of a number of natural resources, particularly land, biodiversity, fresh water, nitrogen and phosphorus. Food systems, and food production in particular, are also a major driver of a number of environmental impacts, such as the loss of biodiversity, soil degradation, water depletion and greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the people who directly or indirectly manage our food systems are also the largest group of natural resource managers in the world and could become critical agents of change in the transformation of current consumption and production systems.

    ​-Food​_systems​_and​_natural​_resources​-2016Food​_Systems​_and​_Natural​_Resources.pdf.pdf (9 MB)
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  • Unlocking the Sustainable Potential Of Land Resources Evaluation Systems, Strategies and Tools

    This report provides an introduction to land evaluation systems, strategies and tools necessary for “development t

    This report provides an introduction to land evaluation systems, strategies and tools necessary for “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The text focuses strongly on how to better match land use with its sustainable potential, in order to reduce the amount of land required to meet human needs, minimize land degradation, and cost-effectively restore already degraded lands. The report provides information that private landowners can use to increase long-term productivity and profitability, while at the same time addressing global objectives defined through land-related Sustainable Development Goals, and particularly 15.3 (land degradation neutrality).

    land​_resources​_full​_report​_english.pdf (3 MB)
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  • ADB - Urban Development in the Greater Mekong Subregion

    Urbanization is set to play an ever greater role in the development of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries, tra

    Urbanization is set to play an ever greater role in the development of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries, transforming their economies and providing support to green economic growth.

    Follow the link for more detial.

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  • The State of Environmental Migration 2015 – A review of 2014

    The State of Environmental Migration series gathers the expertise of researchers, students and professionals to provide

    The State of Environmental Migration series gathers the expertise of researchers, students and professionals to provide an annual assessment of the changing nature and dynamics of environment- and climate-related migration throughout the world.

    state​_environmental​_migration​_2014​_0​_0.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015

    The Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015: Migrants' Contributions to Development, produced by the Asia-Pacific Regional Th

    The Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015: Migrants' Contributions to Development, produced by the Asia-Pacific Regional Thematic Working Group on International Migration, including Human Trafficking, provides an insight into how labour migration, the dominant migration trend in the Asia-Pacific region, can contribute to development in countries of origin and destination in the Asia-Pacific region. It reviews the main migration trends in the Asia-Pacific region; considers how migrants impact on GDP growth, employment, and wages in countries of destination; and considers how the positive impacts of migration can be maximized, while minimizing the negative trends. In general, it finds that migration is a benefit to countries of origin, destination, and migrants themselves; however, further contributions are hampered by the vulnerability of migrant workers to exploitation. It calls for migration policies and forms of international cooperation that are harmonized with development priorities and international human rights and labour standards to ensure that migration is a benefit for all.

    SDD AP Migration Report report v6​-1​-E.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Integrated Planning and Sustainable Development: Challenges and Opportunities

    This Synthesis Report and the eight country studies on which it draws, have been prepared through the Partnership for Ac

    This Synthesis Report and the eight country studies on which it draws, have been prepared through the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE), with funds from the European Commission. The report illustrates the many different sustainable development pathways that countries are pursuing in line with national priorities and contexts. Its country-based evidence and non-prescriptive findings for policymakers and practitioners highlight the need for integrated and coherent development policies, while illustrating a range of inclusive green economy solutions. As such, this report represents an important addition to the global community’s demand-driven resources for advancing the 2030 Agenda.

    Click here for more detail.

    PAGE​_Integrated​_Planning​_and​_SD​_SynthesisReport.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Principles for the assessment of livestock impacts on biodiversity. Version 1

    Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership

    Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership

    The provision of guidance for the quantitative assessment of biodiversity in live¬stock and other sectors is an emerging area of work. This document represents an initial step in which international experts with various backgrounds shared their views on biodiversity assessment. The general objective of this document was to de-velop principles applicable to different assessment methods in order to guarantee a minimum level of soundness, transparency, scientific relevance, and completeness. These principles can be used to identify crucial elements of livestock systems that affect biodiversity, to monitor changes and make improvements, and to produce assessment results for internal or external communication.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6492e.pdf (6 MB)
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  • 2015 UNDP-GEF Annual Performance Report

    This eighth annual performance report of the UNDP Global Environmental Finance (UNDP-GEF) Unit has three primary goals:

    This eighth annual performance report of the UNDP Global Environmental Finance (UNDP-GEF) Unit has three primary goals: one, to provide a snapshot of progress made toward multiple development and environment benefits by projects in each region in 2015 – see Demonstrating Impact; two, to highlight progress made in addressing women, work and the environment – see Gender in Action; and three, to demonstrate the services UNDP provides to the vertical funds that it is accredited to, in particular the Global Environment Facility family of funds – see UNDP-GEF Unit. In addition, development and environment benefits that have been realized through projects and that can be reasonably aggregated at the regional and/or global levels are presented in a series of infographics.  This report demonstrates how investments in the environment in 141 countries are already delivering development benefits. 

    Click here for more detail.

    2015 Annual Performance Report of UNDP​-Supported GEF​-Financed Projects​_DigitalFile.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Natural Connections - How Natural Capital Supports Myanmars People and Economy

    The assessment presented in this report shows where and how Myanmar’s natural capital contributes to clean and rel

    The assessment presented in this report shows where and how Myanmar’s natural capital contributes to clean and reliable drinking water sources, reduced risks from floods inland and storms along the coasts, and to maintaining the functioning of reservoirs and dams by preventing erosion. 

    natural​_connections​_natural capital Myanmar.pdf (7 MB)
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  • The Open Ocean: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 5)

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  • Development Potential for International Shipping on the Lancang-Mekong River (China, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Thailand)

    The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) has seen rapid economic growth of its country membersduring the past two decades, esp

    The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) has seen rapid economic growth of its country membersduring the past two decades, especially the effectiveness of the ASEAN-China FTA. Together with adeeper and greater economic integration process in line with the ASEAN Economic Community(AEC) blueprint, the implementation of the Lancang-Mekong (LM) Cooperation Mechanism, China’s“the Belt and the Road” initiative, and other regional and subregional cooperation frameworks, thereis a greater demand for the development of transport and logistics infrastructure as well as serviceslinkages where the logistics and transport multimodal have been applied and developed in the region.

    In the new development context, Lancang-Mekong (LM) River, as a key part of the GMS transportnetwork, plays a crucial role in transport connectivity between the upper and lower riverine countriesthrough the waterborne navigation system. This navigation system is now fronting both opportunitiesand challenges that have drawn greater attention from China, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (LaoPDR), Myanmar, and Thailand (CLMT) through a due consideration of the potential development ofthe international shipping and transportation route from Simao District in Yunnan Province, China toLuang Prabang in the Lao PDR.

    Development​_Potential​_for​_International​_Shipping​_on​_the​_Lancang​-Mekong​_River.pdf (10 MB)
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  • Community forestry-based climate change adaptation: a practitioner’s brief

    In 2014, the USAID Climate Change Adaptation Project Preparation Facility for Asia and the Pacific(USAID Adapt Asia-Paci

    In 2014, the USAID Climate Change Adaptation Project Preparation Facility for Asia and the Pacific(USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific ) teamed up with RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests to establish ademonstration site in the Bishnupur community of Sarlahi district of Nepal, on planning, financing andimplementing community forestry-based climate change adaptation (CF-CCA)

    community​_forestry​_climate​_change​_adapatation​_brief​_2016​_05​_en.pdf (1 MB)
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  • Forests and climate change after Paris: An Asia-Pacific perspective

    The 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was held i

    The 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was held in Paris, France, 30 November to 11 December 2015. COP 21 and the resulting Paris Agreement have been seen by many as a turning point in international climate negotiations. 

    forests​_and​_climate​_change​_after​_paris​_2016​_05​_en.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Strengthening EIA in Asia

    This report was prepared for the Asia EIA Conference 2016 organised on 10 May by the Ministry of the Environment, Japan

    This report was prepared for the Asia EIA Conference 2016 organised on 10 May by the Ministry of the Environment, Japan (MOEJ). The conference was held under the theme of enhancing EIA as a sustainable development planning tool in Asia in collaboration with the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

    Click here for more detail.

    Strengthening​_EIA​_in​_Asia​_2016​_IGES.pdf (3 MB)
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  • State of Sustainability Initiatives Review: Standards and the Blue Economy

    The SSI Review: Standards and the Blue Economy takes a deep dive into the market and performance trends of the 9 most pr

    The SSI Review: Standards and the Blue Economy takes a deep dive into the market and performance trends of the 9 most prevalent seafood certification schemes operating in the wild catch and aquaculture sectors. The Review provides a reference point for buyers, producers, policy makers and consumers in deciding how best to apply voluntary standards in their own decision-making processes.

    ssi​-blue​-economy​-2016.pdf (20 MB)
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  • MRC: Basin Development Strategy 2016-2020 for the Lower Mekong Basin

    A Dynamic Strategy: responding to change and uncertainty

    A Dynamic Strategy: responding to change and uncertainty

    The Basin Development Strategy for 2016-2020 (henceforth BDS 2016-2020) replaces the 2011-2015 Strategy. This updating reflects the dynamic challenges encountered in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB).  The Mekong, one of the world’s greatest rivers, is an exceptionally complex system with high intra-annual and inter-annual flow variability caused by the Southwest Monsoon, bringing both great risks and opportunities.  It is also a rapidly changing river because of its contribution to the rapid economic development of the basin countries, but also as a consequence of this development on the river itself, including the impacts of increasing population, urbanisation and industrialisation. Adding to these on-going changes are uncertain futures, particularly as a consequence of climate change.

    Click here for detail.

    MRC​-BDP​-strategy​-complete​-final​-02.16.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Forest landscape restoration for Asia-Pacific forests

    The Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) approach, which is still in its nascent stages of development, is rapidly gaining

    The Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) approach, which is still in its nascent stages of development, is rapidly gaining attention as a more appropriate way to restore both degraded forests as well as the surrounding degraded landscape. The great value of this approach is that it integrates forest restoration actions with the desirable objectives of the landscape, and it is undertaken with the full participation of the people who will have a role in the management of the restored areas over the longer term. So, FLR brings together social, environmental and economic considerations in restoring the forests and lands, converse to just restoring an isolated patch of forest without taking into consideration the people in the area. With people having no stake in the forest, the long-term success of the restoration work is not assured.

    forest​_landscape​_restoration​_for​_asia​-pacific​_forests​_2016​_04​_eng.pdf (3 MB)
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  • A global standard for the identification of Key Biodiversity Areas

    The Global Standard for the Identification of Key Biodiversity Areas (IUCN 2016) sets out globally agreed crit

    The Global Standard for the Identification of Key Biodiversity Areas (IUCN 2016) sets out globally agreed criteria for the identification of KBAs worldwide. The KBA Standard establishes a consultative, science-based process for KBA identification, founded on the consistent application of global criteria with quantitative thresholds that have been developed through an extensive consultation exercise spanning several years.

    Sites qualify as global KBAs if they meet one or more of 11 criteria, clustered into five categories: threatened biodiversity; geographically restricted biodiversity; ecological integrity; biological processes; and, irreplaceability. The KBA criteria can be applied to species and ecosystems in terrestrial, inland water and marine environments. Although not all KBA criteria may be relevant to all elements of biodiversity, the thresholds associated with each of the criteria may be applied across all taxonomic groups (other than micro-organisms) and ecosystems.

    Click here for more detial.

    2016​-048.pdf (701 KB)
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  • Natural Capital Assessments at the National and Sub-National level: A Guide for Environmental Practitioners

    Natural capital refers to the stocks of the Earth's natural assets and resources, such as soil,water, air and biodiversi

    Natural capital refers to the stocks of the Earth's natural assets and resources, such as soil,water, air and biodiversity.

    This Guide for Environmental Practitioners from UNEP is a guidance document which's presents eight steps to completing Natural Capital Assessments to inform decision making that supports sustainable economic growth.

    Natural Capital Assessments ​- Guide For Enviro Practictioners ​- UNEP 2016.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Large Marine Ecosystems: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 4)

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  • Transboundary Aquifers and Groundwater Systems of Small Island Developing States: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 1)

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  • Transboundary river basins: Status and trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 3)

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  • MRC: 20 Years of C20 Yearso of Coooperaption eration

    The year 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the Mekong Agreement on Cooperation for the Sustainable Development of the M

    The year 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the Mekong Agreement on Cooperation for the Sustainable Development of the Mekong River Basin. Signed in Chiang Rai on April 5, 1995, the agreement between Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Viet Nam

    20th​-year​-MRC​-2016.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Achieving Environmental Sustainability in Myanmar

    Myanmar is at a critical crossroads. With many environmental assets, and industrial pressure only beginning to deve

    Myanmar is at a critical crossroads. With many environmental assets, and industrial pressure only beginning to develop, it could effectively form policies and regulations that ensure sustainable growth and conservation of key natural resources. This paper aims to identify current and future environmental problems in Myanmar, the pressures underpinning them, and the policy measures that can manage them.

    ADB 2015​- Achieving Environmental Sustainability Myanmar.pdf (2 MB)
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  • The role of community forestry in climate change adaptation in the ASEAN region

    This paper summarizes key discussions from the 1st ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC)

    This paper summarizes key discussions from the 1st ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC) Learning Group workshop organized by RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests in August 2015. The discussions highlight a number of ways community forestry (CF) can support local communities in adapting to climate change.

    Click here for more detail.

    the​_role​_of​_cf​_in​_climate​_change​_adaptation​_in​_asean​_2015​_english.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Mekong Institute: Strategic Plan 2016-2020

    This ‘Strategic Plan 2016 – 2020’ provides theframework that will guide MI’s work to focus on th

    This ‘Strategic Plan 2016 – 2020’ provides theframework that will guide MI’s work to focus on threeregional development themes, together with the issuesand strategies it has identified as being cross cuttingand relevant to all three themes. The plan next setsout the approach that will be taken for monitoring andevaluating performance, and for integrating continuouslearning into all activities. The concluding sectiongives an overview of the institutional framework thatwill guide how MI organizes its work and resources.A final institutional goal defines MI’s commitment tostrive continually for increased internal capacity toachieve development results.

    MI​_Strategic​_Plan​_2016​_2020.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Towards the implementation of the SSF Guidelines in the Southeast Asia region

    Following the endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of F

    Following the endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) by the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in June 2014 and in line with paragraph 13.6 of the document itself, promoting the development regional plans of action for their implementation, a regional workshop was held in Southeast Asia to discuss implementation of the SSF Guidelines. The workshop was co-organized by the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) of the Republic of Indonesia and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) and the FAO Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) Project. Some 116participants attended the workshop representing governments, regional and international organizations, fisherfolk organizations, civil society organization, non-governmental organizations, academia and other relevant actors. The workshop acknowledged the importance of the SSF Guidelines for the Southeast Asia region and agreed on a number of priority action areas for inclusion in a regional plan of action to be developed with the support of SEAFDEC. National plans of action will also be promoted, and the workshop outcomes will be reflected in the implementation planning of the BOBLME Strategic Action Plan (SAP). FAO will continue to support these processes in collaboration with its partners with a view to securing sustainable small-scale fisheries and enhancing the sector’s contribution to food and nutrition security, poverty alleviation and natural resources management.

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    a​-i5253e.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Status Report on Myanmar’s Designated Ecotourism Sites

    This report was produced as a key input into the Government of Myanmar’s Ecotourism Policy and Management Strategy

    This report was produced as a key input into the Government of Myanmar’s Ecotourism Policy and Management Strategy (2015-2025). It overviews the status of tourism and conservation issues in 22 protected areas identified as having ecotourism potential. The technical content and base assessment work for the report was led by the GMS Core Environment Program and the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development led publishing.

    Status Report on Myanmar Designated Ecotourism Sites..pdf (6 MB)
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  • Landscape Partnerships for Sustainable Development: Achieving the SDGs through Integrated Landscape Management

    To achieve the SDGs by 2030 will require a radically different paradigm of development than was applied to the Millenniu

    To achieve the SDGs by 2030 will require a radically different paradigm of development than was applied to the Millennium Development Goals. A new approach that breaks down sectoral barriers, capitalizes on synergies in land uses and human development, and strengthens coordination and participation of a wide range of stakeholders is needed. Integrated landscape management (ILM) is that approach. This paper makes the case for how we get there.

    LPFN​_WhitePaper​_112415c​_lowres.pdf (880 KB)
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  • Migration Initiatives 2016

    Migration Initiatives is the main publication illustrating both the wide scope of IOM activities and the impact that the

    Migration Initiatives is the main publication illustrating both the wide scope of IOM activities and the impact that the Organization aims to have in migration governance worldwide. For the first time ever, Migration Initiatives 2016 is structured around the Migration Governance Framework principles and objectives to provide a comprehensive look at what IOM stands for and its contribution to improved migration governance for sustainable development. Accompanying the overview of IOM planned actions for 2016, Migration Initiatives features a compilation of funding requirements per country, region and sector of activities. Migration Initiatives sums up IOM planned interventions for 2016 in a comprehensive, innovative and looking-forward manner and defines the Organization’s activities to promote well-governed migration for the benefit of all.

    migration​_initiatives2016.pdf (8 MB)
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  • Asian Economic Integration Report 2015: How Can Special Economic Zones Catalyze Economic Development?

    Economic zones have played a key role in economic development in many Asian economies and can be catalysts for econ

    Economic zones have played a key role in economic development in many Asian economies and can be catalysts for economic development, provided the right business environment and policies are put in place.

    In Asia, special economic zones (SEZs) can facilitate trade, investment, and policy reform at a time the region is experiencing a slowdown in trade and economic growth.

    Click here for more detail.

    asian​-economic​-integration​-report​-2015.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Green Energy Choices: the benefits, risks and trade-offs of low-carbon technologies for electricity production

    Faced with an expected doubling in world demand for energy by 2050, massive investment will be needed to develop and ins

    Faced with an expected doubling in world demand for energy by 2050, massive investment will be needed to develop and install systems that can not only meet the energy needs of nine billion people but at the same time reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollution, toxicity, the impacts on land, water and other eco-systems. This investment need presents the perfect opportunity to select the best electricity generation technologies to meet these aims (Chapter 1). This report consists of this Technical Summary, and ten chapters constituting the full report. It identifies important environmental characteristics of low-carbon electricity generation technologies and provides decision makers with essential information on these characteristics. It assesses the impacts of building, operating and dismantling renewable power generation technologies such as hydropower, wind power, photovoltaics, and concentrated solar power on human health, ecosystems and natural resources. It also assesses the impacts of coal- and gas-fired power with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The impacts of these technologies are compared with those of modern coal and gas-fired power without CCS, but with state-of-the-art pollution control.

    ​-green​_energy​_choices​_full​_report​_english.pdf (41 MB)
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  • The Paris Climate Agreement and Beyond: Linking Short-term Climate Actions to Long-term Goals

    This report discusses possible ways to enhance the Parties’ contributions to climate mitigation and finance, and d

    This report discusses possible ways to enhance the Parties’ contributions to climate mitigation and finance, and draws lessons for the international negotiations leading up to the Paris climate agreement. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of the dynamic nature of the climate regime, looking not only at the Paris climate agreement but also at the follow-up of the agreement (so-called “beyond”). This is critical to make the "nationally determined contribution" approach sufficiently effective to achieve the 2°C target. The report also covers the issues of market-based mechanisms and loss and damage as important components of a post-2020 climate regime.

    Click here for more detail.

    IGES​_the​-paris​_uni​_web.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Greater Mekong Subregion Statistics On Growth, Connectivity and Sustainable Development (First Edition)

    The booklet has five chapters. Chapter One presents the country progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals.

    The booklet has five chapters. Chapter One presents the country progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Chapter Two is a regional and country overview of data on production, trade in goods and services, and foreign direct investment. Chapters Three and Four compile indicators in logistics performance, doing business, competitiveness and trade facilitation. Lastly, Chapter Five provides indicators for connectivity, focusing on the transport and information and communications technology sectors.

    gms​-statistics​-1st​-ed.pdf (1 MB)
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  • Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals: From Agenda to Action

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the centrepiece of a new global agreement on what society seeks to become o

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the centrepiece of a new global agreement on what society seeks to become over the next fifteen years. This agreement envisages a world free from poverty and deprivation, and where the fundamental conditions for human prosperity—healthy ecosystems, a stable climate, and a clean environment—are safely maintained. However, the SDGs do not offer a plan for how to achieve such laudable objectives. This book joins a timely discussion on how the SDGs can be implemented. It deals with how the globally agreed goals can be adapted to national and local circumstances, and what actions can pave the way for achieving them. More specifically, the book focuses on how reforms in governance—the way in which authority is exercised and decisions are taken and executed—can bring the SDG agenda into action.

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    00​_All​_Achieving​_the​_SDGs.pdf (4 MB)
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  • Greening Integration in Asia: How Regional Integration Can Benefit People and the Environment

    Regional Integration is stepping up in Asia. The launch of the ASEAN community by the end of 2015 and the possible estab

    Regional Integration is stepping up in Asia. The launch of the ASEAN community by the end of 2015 and the possible establishment of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) signal a new era of deepened regional integration. These and other regional initiatives will influence how Asia develops over the coming decades.

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    IGESGreeningIntergrationAsiaV2015​_eng​_web.pdf (3 MB)
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  • Economic Valuation Of Wastewater: The Cost Of Action And The Cost Of No Action

    This book presents the results of an analytical study on the economic valuation for wastewater, comparing the costof no

    This book presents the results of an analytical study on the economic valuation for wastewater, comparing the costof no action versus the cost of effective wastewater management.

    ​-Economic​_Valuation​_of​_Wastewater​_​_The​_Cost​_of​_Action​_and​_the​_Cost​_of​_No​_Action​-2015Wastewater​_Evaluation​_Report​_Mail.pdf.pdf (8 MB)
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  • Myanmar Ecotourism Policy and Management Strategy

    Myanmar Ecotourism Policy and Management Strategy intends to use ecotourism as a driving force to strengthen the managem

    Myanmar Ecotourism Policy and Management Strategy intends to use ecotourism as a driving force to strengthen the management of Myanmar’s expanding protected areanetwork. It aims to engage all stakeholders to implement ecotourism policies, business models, and management approaches that protect the unique ecosystems of Myanmar, and celebrate indigenous groups that havemade these special areas their home. 

    Myanmar Ecotourism Policy and Management Strategy.pdf (7 MB)
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  • Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN (Rice, Maize and Cassava)

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN (Rice, Maize and Cassava)

    The study on Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN.pdf (9 MB)
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  • Developing an Environmental Monitoring System to Strengthen Fisheries and Aquaculture Resilience and Improve Early Warning in the Lower Mekong Basin

    These proceedings report the result of a sub-regional consultation on the existence and effectiveness of environmental m

    These proceedings report the result of a sub-regional consultation on the existence and effectiveness of environmental monitoring systems for fisheries and aquaculture in the Lower Mekong basin. The document also includes a baseline assessment of environmental monitoring systems in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, and the report of a regional workshop to discuss the assessments findings and future steps to improve an environmental monitoring and early warning system that will improve climate change adaptation in fisheries and aquaculture in the area.

    FAO​-Developing an Environmental Monitoring System.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Don Sahong Hydropower Project

    The Mekong River Commission (MRC) is carrying out prior consultation for the Don Sahong Hydropower project to discuss an

    The Mekong River Commission (MRC) is carrying out prior consultation for the Don Sahong Hydropower project to discuss and evaluate benefits and associated risks of the project which may have significant impacts on the environment and people in the Lower Mekong Basin. The Don Sahong Hydropower Project will produce 260 megawatts of electricity and will be situated in one of the braided channels in the Mekong River’s Siphandone area of Southern Lao PDR.

    Click here for detail report.


    Technical​-Review​-Report​-DSHPP​-040315.pdf (1 MB)
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  • Spatial Planning and Monitoring of Landscape Interventions: Maps to Link People with their Landscapes

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  • Ground-Based Photo-Monitoring of Landscape Changes Arising from Sustainable Land Management Practices

    Aimed at sustainable land management researchers and practitioners, the method presented here uses photographs to track

    Aimed at sustainable land management researchers and practitioners, the method presented here uses photographs to track land-use changes in order to evaluate the progress and effectiveness of specific management practices. The user guide includes an overview of ground-based photo-monitoring, its capabilities and limitations and provides suggestions for those interested in adopting the methodology.

    GBPM​_UsersGuide​_10November2014.pdf (5 MB)
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  • A Landscape Perspective on Monitoring & Evaluation for Sustainable Land Management

    This manual will aid trainers of sustainable land management (SLM) professionals to organize and conduct effective cours

    This manual will aid trainers of sustainable land management (SLM) professionals to organize and conduct effective courses on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) from an integrated landscape management perspective.

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  • Climate Risks, Regional Integration, and Sustainability in the Mekong Region

    The Mekong region is not only rich in natural biodiversity and culturally diverse but also has one of the fastest growin

    The Mekong region is not only rich in natural biodiversity and culturally diverse but also has one of the fastest growing regional economies in the world. Returns from economic growth have raised incomes and improved people’s well-being, but many social and economic challenges remain. It has proven difficult to effectively integrate social, economic, and environmental objectives in pursuing sustainability in the region. Rapid change and the regional interdependence across the Mekong countries and China’s Yunnan province has diverse consequences (SEI 2009). Looking back, there is both credit and blame; looking forward, both opportunities and threats.

    sumernet​_book​_climate​_risks​_regional​_integration​_sustainability​_mekong​_region.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Natural Systems and Climate Change Resilience in the Lower Mekong Basin

    This report draws from the past decade of climate change and natural systems work in the Mekong region to summarise

    This report draws from the past decade of climate change and natural systems work in the Mekong region to summarise findings and lessons for small holder farms and landscape management.

    Click here for more detail.

    LMB Natural Systems Brief JCR final 24 March.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Current status of Social Forestry in climate change adaptation and mitigation in ASEAN region

    This report covers eight ASEAN countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia (particu

    This report covers eight ASEAN countries (Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia (particularly the state of Sabah), Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam). The report examines the current status of social forestry in climate mitigation and adaptation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and aims to update the Initial Baseline Assessment on Social Forestry and Climate Change published in 2010. Additionally, the paper seeks to facilitate information sharing within the region, and the continued development of policies and programmes through providing up-to-date information to all stakeholders. Covering eight countries in the ASEAN region, the research for the report was collected through desk-based research, reviews of national laws and policies, and technical reports.

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    Situational Analysis Final web​_461.pdf (6 MB)
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  • Mekong ARCC Climate Change Impact and Adaptation Study for the Lower Mekong Basin: Protected Areas Report

    This protected areas report provides an outline of protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity in the Lower Mekong

    This protected areas report provides an outline of protected areas (PAs) and biodiversity in the Lower Mekong Basin (LMB), and an overview of threats to PAs other than climate change, including land concessions, infrastructure development, illegal activities, and agriculture. The threats posed by climate change to PAs are then reviewed, followed by a series of case studies of climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, and adaptation options in four protected areas: 1) Nong Bong Kai Non Hunting Area – Thailand; 2) Nakai Nam Theun – Lao PDR; 3) Phnom Prich Wildlife Sanctuary – Cambodia; and 4) U Minh Thuong National Park – Vietnam.

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    mekong​_arcc​_theme​_report​_protected​-areas.pdf (2 MB)
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  • Building Natural Capital: How REDD+ Can Support A Green Economy

    REDD+ is the approach adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to reduce greenhouse

    REDD+ is the approach adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from forests. REDD+ stands for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, plus conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (UNFCCC, 2010). If systematically pursued, REDD+ would bring new momentum and new funding to the task of preserving the world’s forests. REDD+ is already delivering important outcomes as it brings further world attention to the conservation of tropical forests, monitoring the state of forests, and the contributions of people living in and around forests.

    building​_natural​_capital​_full​_report​_english.pdf (18 MB)
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  • ASSESSING GLOBAL LAND USE: Balancing Consumption With Sustainable Supply

    Global cropland is expanding. Changing trends in both the production and consumption of land-based products are increasi

    Global cropland is expanding. Changing trends in both the production and consumption of land-based products are increasing pressure on land resources across the globe. This report discusses the need and options to balance consumption with sustainable production. It focuses on land-based products (food, fuels and fibre) and describes methods which enable countries to determine whether their consumption levels exceed sustainable supply capacities. Strategies and measures are outlined which will allow adjusting the policy framework to balance consumption with these capacities.

    full​_report​-assessing​_global​_land​_useenglish​_pdf.pdf (5 MB)
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  • ADB: Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Environment Initial Sector Assessment, Strategy, and Road Map for Myanmar

    This sector assessment, strategy, and road map highlights the Government of Myanmar’s plans and strategies for add

    This sector assessment, strategy, and road map highlights the Government of Myanmar’s plans and strategies for addressing priority needs for the agriculture, natural resources, and environment sector and identifies possible preliminary areas of international assistance. It assesses key sector development needs by analyzing the strengths, constraints and weaknesses, various risks, and potential threats, as well as the opportunities, including further evolving the development partnership with the Asian Development Bank (ADB).

    ADB 2013 Myanmar Agriculture, Environment Assement.pdf (5 MB)
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  • Myanmar Ecotourism Master Plan - 2013-2020

    This Master Plan is intended as a roadmap to shape the future of tourism in Myanmar. It defines a clear vision, guiding

    This Master Plan is intended as a roadmap to shape the future of tourism in Myanmar. It defines a clear vision, guiding principles and strategic programs in the form of a long-term implementation framework (2013-2020) which is well-suited to the needs of the industry.

    Myanmar Tourism Master Plan 2013​-2020.pdf (4 MB)
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Thanlwin River Basin