GMS

  • March 01, 2018
    IOP Science

    Greenhouse gas emissions of hydropower in the Mekong River Basin

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    The Mekong River Basin in Southeast Asia is undergoing extensive hydropower development, but the magnitudes of related greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) are not well known. This paper provides the first screening of GHG emissions of 141 existing and planned reservoirs in the basin, with a focus on atmospheric gross emissions through the reservoir water surface. The emissions were estimated using statistical models that are based on global emission measurements.

    Our findings indicate that, although the reservoir emissions per produced energy may be low in the Mekong, hydropower cannot be considered categorically as low-emission energy. The emissions can reach the emission levels from fossil fuels power plants, depending on the characteristics and location of the hydropower project. High emissions were related most strongly to low area-to-electricity ratios, large reservoir surface areas and high air temperature. Therefore, each hydropower project should be carefully analysed for its GHG emissions. It is also obvious that careful removal of vegetation and other easily degradable organicmatter from the inundated area of a reservoir is fundamental in minimizing GHG emissions from it.

    IOPScience​_2018​_GHG​-emissions​-of​-hydropower​-in​-the​-Mekong​-River​-Basin.pdf (2 MB)
  • December 01, 2017
    GGGI

    Green Energy Development Technical Guidelines 4th

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    GGGI’s Technical Guidelines on Green Energy Development, the 4th in the series of GGGI Technical Guidelines, published by the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). GGGI developed this Green Energy Development Guidelines based on its experience in providing green growth and energy support to member countries.

    The Guidelines are developed to assist member countries in developing strategic green energy development plans and implementation road maps at every stage of the GGGI value chain. They serve as reference for government officials of GGGI member countries, GGGI staffs and consultants, development partners, and relevant stakeholders who are working on areas related to or looking to develop a project on green energy.

    GGGI’s​-Technical​-Guidelines​-on​-Green​-Energy​-Development​_dereje​-senshaw2017.pdf (2 MB)
  • December 01, 2017
    World Resources Institute

    Roots of Prosperity: The Economics and Finance of Restoring Land

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    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of the benefits and costs of restoring forests and landscapes in countries around the world, demonstrating how smart policies and innovative financing can help governments meet their restoration targets. The authors find that finance, both public and private, for restoration is inadequate for seven reasons, and offers solutions to these financial barriers.

    The publication also outlines the main steps involved in carrying out economic analyses, bringing to light the full value of ecosystem services and social benefits as well as the costs of degradation. These insights can help governments to develop policy instruments and financing mechanisms that promote restoration on the ground. They can also help stakeholders incorporate environmental and social benefits into financing decisions.

    roots​-of​-prosperity.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 01, 2017
    UNEP

    The Emissions Gap Report 2017: A UNEP synthesis report

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    The goal of the Paris Agreement on climate change, as agreed at the Conference of the Parties in 2015, is to keep global temperature rise this century to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. It also calls for efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

    The UN Environment Emissions Gap Report 2017 presents an assessment of current national mitigation efforts and the ambitions countries have presented in their Nationally Determined Contributions, which form the foundation of the Paris Agreement.

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    EGR​_2017.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 01, 2017
    WB

    State and Trends of Carbon Pricing 2017

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  • November 01, 2017
    International Energy Agency

    Technology Roadmap: Delivering Sustainable Bioenergy

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    Bioenergy is the main source of renewable energy today. IEA modelling also indicates that modern bioenergy is an essential component of the future low carbon global energy system if global climate change commitments are to be met, playing a particularly important role in helping to decarbonise sectors such as aviation, shipping and long haul road transport. However, the current rate of bioenergy deployment is well below the levels required in low carbon scenarios. Accelerated deployment is urgently needed to ramp up the contribution of sustainable bioenergy across all sectors, notably in the transport sector where consumption is required to triple by 2030.  But bioenergy is a complex and sometimes controversial topic. There is an increasing understanding that only bioenergy that is supplied and used in a sustainable manner has a place in a low carbon energy future.  This Technology Roadmap re-examines the role of bioenergy in light of changes to the energy landscape over the past five years as well as recent experience in bioenergy policy, market development and regulation. It identifies the technical, policy and financial barriers to deployment, and suggests a range of solutions to overcome them.

    Technology​_Roadmap​_Delivering​_Sustainable​_Bioenergy.pdf (2 MB)
  • October 10, 2017
    UNESCAP

    Asia-Pacific Disaster Report 2017

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    Asia and the Pacific is the region most affected by natural disasters which hit hardest at the poorest countries and communities. And on present trends, as more migrants crowd into slums and shanty towns in Asia-Pacific cities, whole communities are likely to see their homes and livelihoods shattered or washed away by the wilder forces of nature.

    This edition of the Asia-Pacific Disaster Report, looks at the extent and impact of natural disasters across the region and how these intersect with poverty, inequality and the effects of violent conflict. But it also shows how scientific and other advances have increased the potential for building disaster resilience and ensuring that even in the most extreme circumstances people can survive disaster impacts and rebuild their communities and livelihoods.

    Disaster resilience is a key element of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The Sustainable Development Goals are based on the premise of reaching absolutely everyone. When the drought is assessed, when the flood warnings are broadcast, when the tsunami siren sounds, the aim is to ‘leave no one behind’. If governments are to fulfil this ambition, and protect their most vulnerable people, they will need to ground national development strategies firmly in disaster resilience.

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    Asia​-PacificDisasterReport2017Full.pdf (6 MB)
  • October 01, 2017
    FAO

    2017 Forest change in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS)

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    This report looks at both negative and positive drivers that affect forest change in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS) in the last 25 years (1990-2015) in order to have a better understanding of their influence on forests in the region. It evaluates policies and measures in relation to drivers of forest change. Agricultural expansion, infrastructure development particularly hydropower dams and road construction, logging, mining operations and forest fires are the most dominant drivers of forest loss in GMS. At a positive note, almost all countries in the region have adopted policies that support SFM and balance the social, economic and environmental aspects of forestry. Furthermore, there seems to be a movement towards sustainable policies which influence the shift towards SFM, forest conservation and afforestation and reforestation. Although it seems the policies addressing the drivers of deforestation exist at local, national and international level, their effectiveness has been mixed. T his report presents forest changes in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) over a period of 25 years between 1990 and 2015. It describes key drivers that have affected these changes. Some drivers influenced forests negatively in that they resulted in deforestation and forest degradation. On the other hand, positive drivers promoted sustainable forest management (SFM), afforestation and reforestation and forest conservation.

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    2017 FAO Forest Change in the GMS.pdf (4 MB)
  • October 01, 2017
    Climate Focus

    How Improved Land Use Can Contribute to the 1.5°C Goal of the Paris Agreement

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    Climate Focus’ How Land Use Can Contribute to the 1.5°C Goal of the Paris Agreement develops a roadmap of action for the land-use sector to meet its necessary contribution to the Paris Agreement.

    The analysis relies on a modelling of land-sector development trajectories optimizing least-cost pathways, a bottom-up assessment of mitigation potentials, and a correction of potentials for political feasibility. The Global Biosphere Management Integrated Assessment Model, a partial-equilibrium model developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, formed the basis of our modelling. We determined the 40 countries with the highest technical mitigation potential and assessed the feasibility of mitigation action based on their political will and ability to realize this potential. Finally, we outlined 10 priority actions to reduce the land-use sector’s contribution to global warming. The actions range from avoided deforestation, restoration of forests, to diet shifts and reduced food waste.

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    CIFF Report.pdf (6 MB)
  • September 28, 2017
    UNEA

    Towards a pollution-free planet: Background report

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    Pollution today is pervasive and persistent. While the world has achieved significant economic growth over the past few decades, it has been accompanied by large amounts of pollution, with significant impacts on human health and ecosystems and the ways in which some of the major Earth system processes, such as the climate, are functioning. This report describes the pollution challenge, explores what is already being done to address pollution, and proposes 50 focused and actionable interventions to address pollution in all its forms. The report is a call to act towards a pollution-free planet.

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    UNEA​_towardspollution​_long version​_Web.pdf (5 MB)
  • September 08, 2017
    UNESCAP

    Gender, the Environment and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific

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    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development strives for more balanced development by addressing the economic, social and environmental dimensions holistically. The momentum set forth by this agenda provides an historic opportunity for reducing inequality and closing gender gaps. Gender, The Environment and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific examines the intersections between gender and the environment at the household, work, community and policy levels, particularly in the spheres of food security and agriculture, energy, water, fisheries and forestry, with a view to providing strategic entry points for policy interventions. Based on a grounded study of the reality in the Asia-Pacific region, this report assembles good practices and policy lessons that could be capitalized on to advance the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

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    SDD​-Gender​-Environment​-report.pdf (4 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    ADB

    Key Indicators for Asia and the Pacific 2017

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    The Key Indicators presents the latest statistics on a comprehensive set of economic, financial, social, environmental, and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators for the 48 regional members of the Asian Development Bank. It is designed to serve as a resource for information on development issues across the region for a wide audience, including policy makers, development practitioners, government officials, researchers, students, and the general public.

    A key component of this year’s report is a summary of findings from three pilot household surveys to support the development of standardized methods and guidelines for collecting sex-disaggregated data on asset ownership.

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    key​-indicators​-2017.pdf (6 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    ADB

    Trade Facilitation and Better Connectivity for an Inclusive Asia and Pacific

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    This publication investigates the evolution of trade costs, and reviews the state of play of trade facilitation and paperless trade in Asia and the Pacific.

    Trade facilitation increases trade flows, lowers trade cost, and ultimately contributes to sustainable and inclusive growth. This publication, jointly prepared by the Asian Development Bank and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, reviews the state of play of trade facilitation and paperless trade in Asia and the Pacific. It investigates the evolution of trade costs in the region, examines trade facilitation and paperless trade implementation, and highlights the key initiatives and efforts in Central Asia, the Greater Mekong Subregion, South Asia, and the Pacific. It includes impact assessments of trade facilitation implementation and corridor performance on reducing trade costs and increasing trade.

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    trade​-facilitation​-connectivity.pdf (4 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    ADB

    Improving Lives of Rural Communities Through Developing Small Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems

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    Case studies highlight experiences of six pilot projects on the development of small hybrid renewable energy systems in Asian rural areas and small isolated islands.

    Despite significant economic growth in Asia in recent decades, millions of people in rural Asia still lack access to electricity. A project has been implemented to develop small hybrid renewable energy systems in these areas. 

    This publication highlights the experiences of these pilot projects in five developing member countries. It provides technical guidance and recommendations for the deployment of similar systems in minigrids in remote rural locations and small isolated islands to achieve access to electricity and energy efficiency.

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    improving​-lives​-rural​-communities​-renewable​-energy.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 01, 2017
    Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre

    Climate Metrics for Debt and Equity Portfolios: A Framework for Analysis

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    The Paris Agreement requires significantly increased efforts to reduce emissions in the short term and net zero emissions by the second half of the century. To meet the investment needs in green technologies and other emission reduction measures, both public and private financing is required at scale and needs to be applied in a mutually enhancing way. The transformation will include alternative sources of financing since long-term loans becomes scare after the financial crisis.  For the success of the transformation, it is therefore important that investments are compatible with long-term climate protection scenarios.

    The report contributes by providing a conceptual framework of mapping climate metrics. The conceptual framework includes an inventory of existing metrics and classifies them according to two dimensions. As such, it helps to detect what kind of additional climate metrics are still required. Thus it is extending the notion about key design principles for climate metrics. In addition, the report contributes to that debate whether the influence of equity investors on ecological business strategy is bigger than the influence of debt investors as it develops a framework to reflect the consequences of the different positions. The report provides a numerical illustration of a number of the design characteristics that have been introduced and also includes a dynamic perspective in the light of the debate whether to account for debt and equity in a different way. The application of the framework to five hypothetical portfolios supports that equity and debt should not be treated fundamentally different.

    seimetrics201709finalreport.pdf (1 MB)
  • August 01, 2017
    ADB

    Climate Change Operational Framework 2017–2030: Enhanced Actions for Low Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate-Resilient Development

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    This framework provides direction for enhancing resilience and supporting climate adaptation and mitigation actions in ADB operations and business processes.

    The Climate Change Operational Framework 2017–2030 positions ADB to facilitate, collaboratively and proactively, a regional shift toward a low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development path. The operational framework provides guidance across all ADB sector and thematic groups to strengthen climate actions, operationalizing ADB’s commitment to provide at least $6 billion per year in climate change financing from its own resources by 2020. It outlines actions and the institutional measures to be implemented to enable ADB to meet the climate needs of its developing members.

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    ccof​-2017​-2030.pdf (527 KB)
  • August 01, 2017
    ADB

    Catalyzing Green Finance: A Concept for Leveraging Blended Finance for Green Development

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    This publication describes an innovative financing solution for enhancing both financially bankable as well as environmentally sustainable infrastructure projects. A large financing need challenges climate-adjusted infrastructure in developing Asia, estimated at $26 trillion till 2030. This necessitates crowding-in private sources to meet financing, efficiency, and technology gaps. However, a lack of bankable projects is a major hurdle. This publication suggests one possible innovative financing approach. The Green Finance Catalyzing Facility (GFCF) proposes a blended finance framework for governments and development entities to better leverage development funds for risk mitigation, generate a pipeline of bankable green infrastructure projects, and directly catalyze private finance. The GFCF provides useful inputs for the current debate on mainstreaming green finance into country financial systems.

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    catalyzing​-green​-finance.pdf (9 MB)
  • August 01, 2017
    RECOFTC

    Moving from information dissemination to community participation in forest landscapes: How development organizations in Asia and the Pacific are using participatory development communication approaches

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    Traditionally, in the context of environment and natural resources management, many communication efforts have focused on the dissemination of technical information to end-users who were expected to adopt them. Development practitioners were trying to ‘push’ their products on communities in order to receive community commitment to their development initiatives. Further, when planning communication strategies, many projects tend to take a very broad problem as a starting point (a declining forest, for example) and then move right into planning communication activities (for example, information sessions, awareness campaigns). The result is that the target is often missed and despite all the activities undertaken the problem remains unaddressed. Participatory development communication (PDC) takes a different approach. It suggests a shift in focus from informing people with a view to changing their behaviours or attitudes to facilitating exchanges between various stakeholders. These exchanges help the stakeholders to address a common problem or implement a joint development initiative. PDC is a systematic process using participatory techniques and communication media (such as radio, newspapers, TV, social media) to empower communities to participate in the development process, enable them to take the lead on its activities and use the learning generated to improve their livelihoods. The purpose of PDC is to seek sustainable social change by engaging and empowering relevant stakeholders (FAO, 2014). At the heart of PDC and other participatory research and development approaches is people’s meaningful participation and empowerment. This paper offers a brief overview of the basic and practical steps involved in the PDC process to assist sustainable forest practitioners and communication officers to adopt a PDC approach in their work. The paper then reviews the PDC components of six case studies promoting sustainable forest management in Asia and the Pacific. Each project was conducted in 2015–16 and included a primary objective of influencing ‘community awareness and attitudes’ towards sustainable forest management. While the case studies do not offer examples of the complete PDC approach, they highlight how sustainable forest management projects in the Asia-Pacific region are moving away from one-way information dissemination toward using two-way communication approaches and tools to promote community participation in forest decision-making. The case studies were developed following a joint RECOFTC and FAO workshop on 12–15 May 2015 to improve the capacities of forestry communication officers from governments and NGOs to plan, develop and facilitate participatory development processes in building and implementing more effective communication strategies. Workshop participants are members of the Asia-Pacific Forest Communication Network (APFCN).

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    participatory​_development​_communcation​_case​_studies​_08​_2017​_en.pdf (5 MB)
  • July 26, 2017
    UNESCAP

    Regional Road Map for Implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific

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    At the global level in 2015 countries set in motion the most far reaching and ambitious development agenda of our time, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. In Asia and the Pacific, countries have already begun translating this ambitious agenda into action and many have already set up the national architecture for coordinating and promoting the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). However, the policy transformations required to put countries on track to achieve the SDGs have yet to take shape across this or any other region. Business as usual policies and investments are locking countries into unsustainable pathways that will create a gap between ambition and action.

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    Final SDG Roadmap​_Updated Logo.pdf (631 KB)
  • July 10, 2017
    UNESCAP

    Statistical Yearbook for Asia and the Pacific 2016: SDG Baseline Report

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    The report presents the SDG baseline for the Asia and the Pacific both at the regional and sub-regional levels for selected targets of each SDG. The main objective of the Report is to highlight critical gaps and challenges of the region in achieving the SDGs and inform inter-governmental and inter-agency regional decision making in support of implementing the 2030 development agenda in the region.

    The report is organized in three parts:

    • Part I provides a regional snapshot of progress since 2000 (starting of the MDGs) and acceleration that is required in order for the region to achieve the 16 goals by 2030. This is further elaborated in a dashboard across the target areas, highlighting the size of the gaps between a “business-as-usual” scenario and the required pace of progress by 2030.
    • Part II then sets out a more detailed, goal by goal baseline for the region for selected targets, drawing on the latest data available on the proposed global indicators as well as supplementary statistical information.
    • Part III concludes by highlighting key findings of the baseline report and the regional vision for transforming official statistics to tackle challenges in meeting the statistics and data requirements for the follow-up and review of the 2030 agenda. It also emphasize critical role of data disaggregation for achieving the leave-no-one-behind ambition of the SDGs.

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    ESCAP​_SYB2016​_SDG​_baseline​_report.pdf (28 MB)
  • July 01, 2017
    ADB

    A Region at Risk: The Human Dimensions of Climate Change in Asia and the Pacific

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    Recent regional climate change projections have consequences for human systems, particularly for developing countries in Asia and the Pacific.

    Asia and the Pacific continues to be exposed to climate change impacts. Home to the majority of the world’s poor, the population of the region is particularly vulnerable to those impacts. Unabated warming could largely diminish previous achievements of economic development and improvements, putting the future of the region at risk.

    The report discusses the most recent projections pertaining to climate change and climate change impacts in Asia and the Pacific, and the consequences of these changes to human systems, particularly for developing countries. It also highlights gaps in the existing knowledge and identifies avenues for continued research.

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    region​-risk​-climate​-change.pdf (4 MB)
  • July 01, 2017
    UNEP

    Green Finance Progress Report 2017

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    The G20 Green Finance Synthesis Report adopted at the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou in September 2016 set out seven options identified by the G20 Green Finance Study Group (GFSG) to accelerate the mobilization of green finance. This paper highlights some of the progress made against these seven options in G20 members and internationally since June 2016. Progress described is illustrative and non-exhaustive, drawing on voluntary contributions from GFSG members and a broader review of global trends. While not comprehensive, it provides a useful summary of many of the key developments and the overall progress made to mobilize private capital for green investment.

    Progress observed and reported in this paper indicates that momentum is growing in mainstreaming green finance into the architecture and practice of financial and capital markets. This momentum has directly resulted in an increased mobilization of green finance. UN Environment tracks a range of green finance measures including, for example, green financing mobilized, policies, regulations, standards, guidelines, principles and fiscal incentives. This report shows that more measures related to green finance have been introduced since June 2016 compared with any other one-year period since 2000.

    Green Finance Progress Report 2017.pdf (2 MB)
  • June 30, 2017
    the Stimson Center’s Southeast Asia

    Mekong Power Shift: Emerging Trends in the GMS Power Sector

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  • June 01, 2017
    ADB

    Lessons from ADB Transport Projects: Moving Goods, Connecting People, and Disseminating Knowledge

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    From in-country to cross-country connections, whether by land, air, or water, transport is a key ingredient that enables nations to achieve economic and social development goals.

    ADB has been working with developing member countries to improve roads, airports, waterways, and other transport infrastructures to provide people with better access to economic opportunities, public services, domestic and international markets. This publication shares 20 case stories bearing practical knowledge and lessons for transport projects across Asia and the Pacific region under different socioeconomic and political situations.

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    lessons​-transport​-projects.pdf (8 MB)
  • June 01, 2017
    IUCN

    Guidelines for tourism partnerships and concessions for protected areas: Generating sustainable revenues for conservation and development

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    Many Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) underutilise tourism as a means to contribute towards the financial sustainability of protected areas. The development of the present guidelines on tourism partnerships and concessions for protected areas is a response to this under-utilized potential and to recent decisions of the CBD on tourism.

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    2017​-044.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 16, 2017
    EcoAgriculture Partners, IUCN

    Business for Sustainable Landscapes

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    This report draws widely from the diverse experience of landscape partnerships to analyze the challenges and opportunities for businesses and their partners, and lays out critical actions needed by businesses themselves, and by financial institutions, governments and landscape programs, to improve the effectiveness of landscape partnerships and replicate the approach in many more places.

    Business​-for​-Sustainable​-Landscapes​-An​-Action​-Agenda​-for​-Sustainable​-Development​-May​-2017.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 12, 2017
    UNEP

    Green Technology Choices: The Environmental and Resource Implications of Low-Carbon Technologies

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    Big wins for human health, natural resources in switch to energy efficiency:

    - Low-carbon technologies aid clean air, save water and cut land use
    - 25 billion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions and 17 million tonnes of particulates a year could be avoided through low-carbon and energy efficiency technologies

    report​_green​_technology​_choices​-final​-2​_web​_090517.pdf (5 MB)
  • May 02, 2017
    UNEA

    UN Environment's Freshwater Strategy 2017 – 2021

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    This document describes UN Environment’s five-year Freshwater Strategy from 2017 to 2021. As a living document, it is intended to guide work related to freshwater across UN Environment’s divisions, sub-programmes and regional offices, as well as interactions with governments and partners at national, regional and global levels. The Freshwater Strategy supports the implementation of UN Environment’s Medium-Term Strategy and Programme of Work adopted by universal United Nations (UN) membership through the UN Environment Assembly. Coming at a critical time for freshwater in general, and the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in particular, this strategy aims to unlock the potential of integrated collaboration and spur leadership on freshwater issues globally.

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    UNEP​-full​_report​-170502.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    ADB

    Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific: 50 Years of The Asian Development Bank

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    This book is a history of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), a multilateral development bank established 50 years ago to serve Asia and the Pacific.

    Focusing on the region’s economic development, the evolution of the international development agenda, and the story of ADB itself, Banking on the Future of Asia and the Pacific raises several key questions: What are the outstanding features of regional development to which ADB had to respond? How has the bank grown and evolved in changing circumstances? How did ADB’s successive leaders promote reforms while preserving continuity with the efforts of their predecessors? ADB has played an important role in the transformation of Asia and the Pacific over the past 50 years. As ADB continues to evolve and adapt to the region’s changing development landscape, the experiences highlighted in this book can provide valuable insight on how best to serve Asia and the Pacific in the future.

    50years​-adb.pdf (5 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    ADB

    Financing Asian Irrigation: Choices Before Us

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    By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Improved irrigation productivity and greater financial sustainability are critical.

    Water resources are becoming increasingly scarce in the Asia Pacific region. By 2050, agriculture will need to produce 100% more food in developing countries. Climate change and rapid population growth will place new pressures on already scarce water resources. Improved irrigation productivity—more crop per drop—and greater financial sustainability are critical. Estimates for the Asian region place a $12.31 billion annual investment required for irrigation between 2005 and 2013.

    This publication looks into how the Asia and Pacific region is addressing the need to sustainably fund large-scale, publicly owned and managed surface irrigation and drainage systems.

    financing​-asian​-immigration.pdf (2 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    ADB

    Risk Financing for Rural Climate Resilience in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This report presents the findings of a climate risk financing study conducted by the GMS Core Environment Program in 28 rural communities in Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, and Viet Nam. It provides an overview of the frequency and severity of climate-related disasters for the communities, the impact of these on rural livelihoods, and how local people currently manage climate risks. The report also explores what climate risk financing strategies could be applied in such communities, including the potential costs and benefits.

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    risk​-financing​-rural​-climate​-resilience​-gms.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 01, 2017
    WB

    Results-Based Climate Finance in Practice: Delivering Climate Finance for Low-Carbon Development

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    Results-based financing is a well-established financing modality in the health and education sectors but it is still in an early stage of deployment in the area of climate change. This report reviews 74 results-based climate financing (RBCF) programs implemented in developing countries with an objective to: assess the characteristics and overall volume of funding flowing through RBCF programs, describe the various approaches to designing and implementing RBCF programs, and compare practical experiences with applying RBCF with the existing theory and literature. The report finds that RBCF can: facilitate carbon pricing and market building, support host countries' policy processes to achieve their NDCs, and leverage private sector activity and financing. RBCF can thus play a critical role in mobilizing the resources and supporting the policies and actions needed to achieve the objectives of the Paris Agreement.

    115053​-WP​-PUBLIC​-111p​-RBCFinPracticeFinalMay.pdf (2 MB)
  • April 24, 2017
    SEI

    SEI Annual Report 2016

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  • April 06, 2017
    Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre

    Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2017

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  • April 01, 2017
    ADB

    Asian Development Outlook (ADO) 2017: Transcending the Middle-Income Challenge

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    Developing Asia has continued to perform well, even as recovery in the major industrial economies remains weak. The region is forecast to expand by 5.7% in 2017 and 2018, nearly the 5.8% growth achieved in 2016.

    Decades of rapid growth transformed developing Asia from a low-income region to middle income. Sustaining growth to power the transition to high income will depend on much greater improvement in productivity. Innovation, human capital, and infrastructure are the three pillars of productivity growth. Supportive institutions and policies, underpinned by macroeconomic stability, can strengthen all three pillars. Asia’s dynamic track record suggests that attaining high income status, while challenging, is achievable.

    ado​-2017.pdf (7 MB)
  • April 01, 2017
    ADB

    Clean Energy Financing Partnership Facility: Annual Report 2016

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    ADB's Clean Energy Financing Partnership continues to provide critical financial support to clean energy projects with $2.1 billion in clean energy investments in 2016.

    The Clean Energy Financing Partnership Facility (CEFPF) was established by ADB in April 2007, to assist developing member countries improve energy security and transit to low-carbon use through cost-effective investments, particularly in technologies that result in greenhouse gas mitigation. CEFPF is composed of the Clean Energy Fund, the Asian Clean Energy Fund, the Carbon Capture and Storage Fund and the Canadian Climate Fund for the Private Sector in Asia. The Facility contributes to the energy sector in achieving the scaled up ADB’s annual target set in September 2015, ADB pledged to double its annual climate financing to $6 billion by 2020, with $4 billion for climate mitigation and $2 billion for climate adaptation. The energy sector is expected to contribute about $3 billion to climate mitigation.

    This annual report provides CEFPF's operational results and overall implementation progress from 1 January to 31 December 2016.

    cefpf​-annual​-report​-2016.pdf (3 MB)
  • April 01, 2017
    FAO

    Agroforestry in rice production landscapes in Southeast Asia: A practical manual

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    This publication represents an output of work conducted on trees outside forests (TOF) as part of Regional Rice Initiative (RRI) Phase 2. It provides practical information on the status, benefits and techniques related the use of TOF in rice production landscapes in Southeast Asia. The manual describes the main rice-based farming systems in Southeast Asia, discusses the potential of agroforestry in enhancing the livelihood of smallholder farmers in rice growing areas in Southeast Asia, and gives an overview of traditional and innovative practices integrating trees in rice-based farms and landscapes. The manual also provides practical information to guide the planning, design and management of agroforestry in rice production systems in Southeast Asia, including case studies from several countries in the region.

    a​-i7137e.pdf (5 MB)
  • April 01, 2017
    OECD

    Climate-Resilient Infrastructure: Getting the Policies Right

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    Climate change will affect all types of infrastructure, including energy, transport and water. Rising temperatures, increased flood risk and other potential hazards will threaten the reliable and efficient operation of these networks, with potentially large economic and social impacts. Decisions made now about the design, location and operation of infrastructure will determine how resilient they will be to a changing climate.

    This paper provides a framework for action aimed at national policymakers in OECD countries to help them ensure new and existing infrastructure is resilient to climate change. It examines national governments’ action in OECD countries, and provides recent insights from professional and industry associations, development banks and other financial institutions on how to make infrastructure more resilient to climate change.

    Click here for more detial.

    Climate​-resilient infrastructure ​- Getting the policies right.pdf (2 MB)
  • March 27, 2017
    Mekong Partnership for the Environment

    Guidelines on Public Participation in EIA in the Mekong Region

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    The Guidelines on Public Participation in Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in the Mekong Region have been developed to address the shared concern for increasing meaningful public participation in development planning, in the context of increasing investment projects across the Mekong region. The Guidelines are intended to help stimulate more effective practices in public participation. These Guidelines are also playing an important role in informing the development of national level guidelines on public participation in EIA. This document is intended as a living resource and it is hoped that it will inspire the continued strengthening of EIA policies and practices in each country and across the region, as well as to advance greater regional collaboration and harmonization among Mekong and ASEAN nations.

    Click here for more detail.

    Regional EIA Guidelines​-Final.pdf (2 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    ADB

    Earth Observation for a Transforming Asia and Pacific

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    Satellite-based environmental information are innovative solutions that can provide new ways for ADB to serve and address development challenges.

    This report summarizes results of the initiative Earth Observation for a Transforming Asia and Pacific (EOTAP), that brought together the European Space Agency (ESA) and ADB to promote and demonstrate satellite Earth Observation in support of ADB’s investments in its developing member countries (DMCs).

    Click here for more detail.

    earth​-observation​-asia​-pacific.pdf (13 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    ADB

    Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity

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    In Asia and the Pacific extreme income poverty remains widespread. This analysis of trends and highlighted good practices provides useful input into regional and global dialogues.

    This report is produced under a renewed partnership between United Nations (ESCAP), ADB, and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to support national and regional efforts to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It explores five megatrends that will determine whether everyone will be able to thrive and fulfill their expectations for a better life in the future: regional economic cooperation and integration; rural–urban transitions; demographic changes; ICT access and connectivity; and demand for natural resources.

    Click here for more detail.

    eradicating​-poverty​-asia​-pacific.pdf (4 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    UNEP

    Resource Efficiency: Potential and Economic Implications

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    As our population continues to grow, so does the pressure on our finite and fragile resources. Yet that threat can be turned into an opportunity to deliver the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report highlights the massive potential of using increased efficiency as a costeffective way to protect resources, tackle climate change and reduce our environmental footprint, while boosting economic growth, employment and development.

    resource​_efficiency​_report​_march​_2017​_web​_res.pdf (22 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    Mekong Institute

    BASELINE SURVEY REPORT: Enhancing Competitiveness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises In The Southern Economic Corridor of ASEAN Mekong Sub-Region (AMS)

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    This is the baseline survey made for the project “Enhancing Competitiveness of Small and Medium- sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the Southern Economic Corridor (SEC) of ASEAN Mekong Sub region (AMS)” for the period 2016 – 2018. The Project is supported by the Government of Japan through Japan-ASEAN Integration Fund (JAIF) and covers a wide geographical area of 19 provinces in the SEC. With capacity development programs provided to local SMEs, CCIs, government officials and stakeholders, the project is about to (i) formulate SME clusters and integrate them into the regional value chains; (ii) to facilitate trade and investment promotions for the SME clusters though a number of trade and investment promotion events as well as SME database developments; and (iii) strengthen the business development services (BDS) providers to improve the coverage and quality of BDS services available to the target SME clusters.

    JAIF​-SEC​_Baseline​_Survey​_Report​_​-​_Final.pdf (2 MB)
  • March 01, 2017
    ADB

    Economics of Climate Change Mitigation in Central and West Asia

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    This report provides an assessment of the costs, benefits, and investment opportunities for GHG abatement in the energy and transport sectors of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan.

    The ecological complexity of the Central and West Asian region gives way to diverse ecosystems with rich natural resources and hydrocarbon reserves; countries in this region are not only exposed to climate change risks, but there is growing recognition that their carbon-intensive economies necessitate reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in line with global efforts to mitigate climate change.

    The Economics of Climate Change in Central and West Asia, a regional technical assistance (TA) project of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) was designed to identify costs and opportunities in investments for low-carbon growth and climate resilience and low-carbon growth, under two components:

    • mitigation of climate change, which assessed the costs and benefits of GHG emission reduction measures and formulated low-carbon growth investment proposals for energy and transport in the most carbon-intensive countries in the region; and
    • adaptation to climate change, which assessed the costs and benefits of implementing adaptation measures to reduce the adverse effects of climate change on energy and water resources in the most vulnerable countries.
    economics​-climatechange​-cwa.pdf (2 MB)
  • February 28, 2017
    ADB

    The Long Road Ahead: Status Report on the Implementation of the ASEAN Mutual Recognition Arrangements on Professional Services

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    Over the past decade, ASEAN has signed Mutual Recognition Arrangements (MRAs) in seven occupations, all designed to facilitate professional mobility within the region.

    MRAs are not easy to operationalize, however. Despite progress in key areas, Member States face complex challenges as they move toward full implementation. This report is the latest in a project by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) to improve understanding of the barriers to the free movement of professionals within ASEAN and to support the development of strategies to overcome these hurdles. The report draws on the insights of nearly 400 ASEAN and Member State officials, private-sector employers, training directors, and others who participated in focus group discussions, meetings, and surveys convened by ADB and MPI.

    Click here for more detail.

    long​-road​-ahead.pdf (2 MB)
  • February 22, 2017
    ADB

    Safeguarding the Rights of Asian Migrant Workers from Home to the Workplace

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    This report points to the growing number of labor migrants in Asia and examines the policy question of how to best safeguard their rights. Governments and stakeholders in both origin and destination countries have largely recognized their mutual interest in safeguarding labor migrants. Multilateral frameworks have also put this in focus, with safe and orderly migration seen as important. This report examines some of the key policy questions in protecting migrant workers, including how to promote fair recruitment of less-skilled workers, and how to address vulnerable groups such as irregular migrants and domestic workers.

    Click here for more detail.

    adbi​-safeguarding​-rights​-asian​-migrant​-workers.pdf (4 MB)
  • February 15, 2017
    FiBL & IFOAM - ORGANICS INTERNATIONAL

    The World of Organic Agriculture 2017

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  • February 01, 2017
    RECOFTC

    Social forestry and climate change in the ASEAN region

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    This report is the third in a series of reports on the status of social forestry and its role in climate change mitigation and adaptation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. An initial baseline report was published in 2011 providing a regional overview for 2010 and the fist situational analysis was published in 2014, presenting the status in 2013. This analysis report, the second status update, presents the most up-to-date government data available on forests, social forestry and climate change at national and regional levels, and identifis key changes and developments during the last three years. The main focus of the report is the eight ASEAN countries with government-supported social forestry programmes, namely Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Viet Nam.

    Click here for more detail.

    social​_forestry​_and​_climate​_change​_in​_the​_asean​_region​_2017​_01​_en.pdf (4 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    ADB

    Energy Storage in Grids with High Penetration of Variable Generation

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    With increased emphasis on reducing emissions from the power sector, grid-level energy storage can enable larger penetration of renewable energy into the grid.

    Grid-level energy storage is likely to dominate the conversation in the power industry in the coming years, just like renewable energy dominated the conversation in the past 2 decades. This report targets investors, developers, utility planners, power sector policy makers, and readers who wish to understand the role energy storage is likely to play in the smart grid of the future. For developing countries, the report provides an introduction to the necessary technical background on energy storage, the role it is likely to play as penetration of renewable energy increases in the grid, and the policy prescriptions to realize the wide range of benefits of energy storage.

    Click here for more detail.

    energy​-storage​-grids.pdf (768 KB)
  • February 01, 2017
    FAO

    FAO and the SDGs

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    On 25 September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – including 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and 169 targets – committing the international community to end poverty and hunger and achieve sustainable development between 2016 and 2030. Six months later, a global indicator framework for the SDGs – comprising 230 indicators - was identified to monitor the 169 targets and track progress, becoming the foundation of the SDGs’ accountability structure. The number of indicators - four times greater than for the MDGs - represents an immense challenge for countries. FAO - proposed ‘custodian’ UN agency for 21 SDG indicators and a contributing agency for six more – can assist countries in meeting the new monitoring challenges. This publication presents FAO’s work in developing and strengthening indicators that measure food, agriculture and the sustainable use of natural resources, shining a light on the 21 indicators of FAO custodianship. It describes how the organization can support countries track progress and make the connection between monitoring and policymaking to achieve the SDGs.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6919e.pdf (2 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    FAO

    FAO's strategic work to enable inclusive and efficient agricultural and food systems

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    FAO helps to build safe and efficient food systems that support smallholder agriculture. In order for developing countries to benefit from globalization and commercialization, FAO assists countries in building the capacity to access international markets, meeting international standards for food safety and hygiene and improving processes along entire value chains.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6627e.pdf (10 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    FAO

    Strategic work of FAO for Sustainable Food and Agriculture

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    FAO promotes the transition to sustainable and climate-resilient agricultural policies and governance mechanisms, working with countries on reviewing their policies and investment strategies and helping them align their policies and programmes in support of implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as well as the Paris Agreement on climate change.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6488e.pdf (9 MB)
  • February 01, 2017
    World Resources Institute

    Attracting Private Investment to Landscape Restoration: A Roadmap

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    Many restoration projects seek to raise capital, but restoration leaders often lack knowledge of the investment process. The New Restoration Economy—part of the Global Restoration Initiative at the World Resources Institute—has found that successful efforts to attract private capital involve four steps. The roadmap elaborates on each of these four steps in turn and is based on our global experience in restoration and our insider perspective on the investment process.

    Attracting​_Private​_Investment​_to​_Landscape​_Restoration​_​-​_A​_Roadmap​_0.pdf (403 KB)
  • January 23, 2017
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Public Policy Guidelines for Integrated Landscape Management

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    National and sub-national policies that create the enabling conditions for integrated landscape management still need to be put in place in most areas of the world. Thankfully, policymakers have a large set of tools at their disposal, many of which are very low or no-cost. Further, there are simple steps that can be taken right away by individual agencies or localities to put ILM-friendly policy implementation on the horizon.

    Public​-Policy​-Guidelines​-for​-ILM​-January​-2017​-Final.pdf (2 MB)
  • January 19, 2017
    ASEAN

    Investing in ASEAN 2017

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    Since its formation, ASEAN has seen an underdeveloped region grow into one of the most dynamic drivers of today’s global economy. As it marks its fiftieth anniversary in 2017, the Association’s ten member countries are a significant focus of international investment as Southeast Asia’s success story continues, following the formation of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC).

    Investing​-in​-ASEAN​-2017​-.pdf (5 MB)
  • January 13, 2017
    UNDP

    UNDP's Response to El Nino and La Nina: From recurring crisis to resilience

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    The 2015-2016 El Niño phenomenon has been one of the strongest on record, affecting deeply the lives and livelihoods of more than 60 million people across 40 countries. It has devastated crops and killed livestock, in some cases dried up water-sources in others caused massive flooding, driven up malnutrition rates, increased disease outbreaks and caused significant migration.

    Click here for more detail.

    El Niño UNDP Response.pdf (4 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    International Organization for Migration (IOM)

    Assessing the Climate Change Environmental Degradation and Migration Nexus in South Asia

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    South Asia, comprising eight countries including Bangladesh, Maldives and Nepal, is affected by a range of natural disasters including floods, glacial lake outburst floods, storm surges, droughts, cyclones and heavy precipitation. These disasters take a huge toll as they displace thousands of people every year. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has predicted that slow-onset and sudden-onset disasters will increase in severity and frequency, threatening lives and livelihoods across the region. To provide evidence to this issue and assess these trends, the International Organization for Migration has produced an assessment study on climate change, environmental degradation and migration in South Asia. The study contains a review of literature and policies, as well as findings from field research conducted in Bangladesh, Maldives and Nepal. To ensure that climate migration is comprehensively addressed, the study also contains model plans of action ‒ developed after a consultative process at the national level ‒ that can be implemented.

    environmental​_degradation​_nexus​_in​_south​_asia.pdf (12 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    CIFOR

    CIFOR Priorities 2017: Advancing research for forests and people

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    Aligned with CIFOR’s 2016-2025 Strategy, this document serves as a ‘road map’ to putting the strategy in practice through our impact-oriented research, capacity building, and outreach and engagement activities. Produced on a yearly basis and reviewed at CIFOR’s Annual Meeting, it aims to guide funding partners, implementing partners and staff on CIFOR’s current and future plans to meet the most pressing challenges of forest and landscape management around the world.

    Click here for more detail.

    PCIFOR1701.pdf (3 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    FAO

    Strategic Work of FAO to Increase the Resilience of Livelihoods

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    Together with its partners, FAO works to increase the resilience of agricultural livelihoods at risk of disasters and crises. People with resilient livelihoods are better able to withstand damage, recover and adapt when disasters cannot be avoided. The increasing frequency and intensity of disasters caused by climate change reinforces the urgency to build the resilience of agricultural livelihoods of vulnerable communities.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6463e.pdf (8 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    Biodiversity International

    Creating mutual benefits: examples of gender and biodiversity outcomes from Bioversity International’s research

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    Bioversity International uses a gender lens to support the differentiated gender-specific knowledge and priorities linked to women’s and men’s access and management of resources. Women and men have different aspirations, skills and knowledge. The following pages comprise a series of fact sheets featuring Bioversity International case studies with local NGOs and partners. These case studies illustrate successful outcomes in gender and biodiversity through the use of gender-specific research methods.

    Creating​_GSICP.pdf (15 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    FAO

    Guide for planning, construction and maintenance of forest roads

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    The first part of the Manual introduces the main steps of forest road network planning and gives guidance on road construction under different site conditions. It demonstrates good practices to minimize the area used for building purposes, to keep the environmental impact as low as possible and to maintain forest productivity. It describes the machinery suitable for the different construction phases and compares the advantages of machine types. The second part of the Manual introduces the goals and best practices of regular forest road maintenance which is a key operation that enables multi-purpose use of forests. It gives an overview on the main causes of forest road degradation and explains the different maintenance regimes and maintenance activities.

    a​-i7051e.pdf (18 MB)
  • January 01, 2017
    Mekong Business Initiative

    2016 Mekong Business Initiative (MBI) Annual Report

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    The Australian Government’s Mekong Business Initiative (MBI) was launched in early 2015 to catalyze private sector-led innovation and growth in the emerging Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) market. It is an advisory facility financed jointly by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Government of Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), for a total of $10.5 million. MBI, which is managed by ADB, focuses on Cambodia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Myanmar, and Vietnam (collectively–CLMV) because these countries are linked geographically; they have similar natural resources and agrarian economies (although Vietnam is more industrialized); and they have strong potential for economic growth but need to improve the environment for private enterprise and innovation to catch up with their ASEAN counterparts.

    To achieve MBI’s expected outcome of an improved business enabling environment for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), MBI carries out its activities through subprojects under three pillars: improved public-private dialogue on private sector development (PSD) policies and regulations, a more robust financing environment, and a more dynamic ecosystem for innovation.

    Click here for more detial.

    2016​-MBI​-Annual​-report.pdf (10 MB)
  • December 19, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary Lakes and Reservoirs: Status and Future Trends (Volume 2)

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  • December 15, 2016
    ADB

    Asian Economic Integration Report 2016

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    With the continued anemic global economic recovery, trade growth in Asia and the Pacific decelerated in 2015, falling further behind growth in gross domestic product.

    Click here for detial report.

    AsianEconomicIntegrationReport​-2016​-mainreport.pdf (4 MB) AsianEconomicIntegrationReport​-2016​-highlights.pdf (1 MB)
  • December 07, 2016
    UNDP

    Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate: Strategy Note on Sustainable Energy

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    UNDP's Energy Strategy, 2017-2021 

    UNDP’s Sustainable Energy Strategy Note, 2017-2021: Delivering Sustainable Energy in a Changing Climate articulates – for the first time – UNDP’s vision, mission, approach, guiding principles, and focus in the area of sustainable energy. It also highlights the critical role that sustainable energy plays in advancing major outcomes from post-2015 global processes including the SDGs, the Paris Agreement, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, and the New Urban Agenda.

    Click here for more detail.

    UNDP Energy Strategy 2017​-2021.pdf (3 MB)
  • December 06, 2016
    UNDP

    BIOFIN Workbook: Mobilizing Resources for Biodiversity and Sustainable Development

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    The 2016 BIOFIN Workbook was developed based on the inputs and lessons generated from BIOFIN implementation in 30 countries: Belize, Brazil, Botswana, Bhutan, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, Fiji, Georgia, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Malaysia, Mexico, Mongolia, Mozambique, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Uganda, Vietnam and Zambia.

    Click here for more detail.

    BIOFINWorkbook2016.pdf (5 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    UNEP

    The Rise Of Environmental Crime: A Growing Threat To Natural Resources, Peace, Development and Security

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    The growth rate of these crimes is astonishing. The reportthat follows reveals for the first time that this new area ofcriminality has diversified and skyrocketed to become theworld’s fourth largest crime sector in a few decades, growingat 2-3 times the pace of the global economy. INTERPOL andUNEP now estimate that natural resources worth as much asUSD 91 billion to USD 258 billion annually are being stolenby criminals, depriving countries of future revenues anddevelopment opportunities.

    The​_rise​_of​_environmental​_crime​_​_A​_growing​_threat​_to​_natural​_resources​_peace,​_development​_and​_security​-2016environmental​_crimes.pdf.pdf (9 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    FAO

    State of the World's Forests 2016 - Forests and agriculture: land-use challenges and opportunities

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    Forests and trees support sustainable agriculture. They stabilize soils and climate, regulate water flows, give shade and shelter, and provide a habitat for pollinators and the natural predators of agricultural pests. They also contribute to the food security of hundreds of millions of people, for whom they are important sources of food, energy and income. Yet, agriculture remains the major driver of deforestation globally, and agricultural, forestry and land policies are often at odds. The State of the World’s Forests (SOFO) 2016 shows that it is possible to increase agricultural productivity and food security while halting or even reversing deforestation, highlighting the successful efforts of Costa Rica, Chile, the Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Tunisia and Viet Nam. Integrated land-use planning is the key to balancing land uses, underpinned by the right policy instruments to promote both sustainable forests and agriculture.

    SOFO2016​_FAO.pdf (5 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    CIFOR

    CIFOR Strategy 2016 – 2025: Stepping up to the new climate and development agenda

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    Since CIFOR last presented a 10-year strategy in 2008, we find ourselves in a world with continually evolving development and environment challenges. Millions of hectares of tropical forests have been converted to agriculture, degraded landscapes amount to nearly 2 billion hectares, and inequality has grown in countries around the world. Yet, there is reason to be optimistic: forest expansion and restoration are gaining ground, the rate of deforestation is slowing, and awareness of the importance of forests is spreading among governments, corporations and the global public.

    Click here for more detail.

    CIFORStrategy2016.pdf (3 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    FAO

    The State of Food and Agriculture 2016 (SOFA): Climate change, agriculture and food security

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    The 2016 SOFA report presents evidence on today and tomorrow’s impact of climate change on agriculture and food systems. The report assesses the options to make agriculture and food systems resilient to climate change impacts, while minimizing environmental impacts. It shows that making agriculture and food systems sustainable is both economically and technically feasible. However barriers to the adoption of appropriate technologies and management practices will have to be lowered, especially for smallholder farmers and women farmers amongst them. Likewise, an overhaul is needed of agricultural and food policies to shift incentives in favour of investments, worldwide, in sustainable technologies and practices.

    Click here to more detail.

    a​-i6030e​_3.pdf (6 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    Bioversity International

    Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity: Good Practices for Insitu and On-Farm Conservation

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    Farmers have developed a range of agricultural practices to sustainably use and maintain a wide diversity of crop species in many parts of the world. This book documents good practices innovated by farmers and collects key reviews on good practices from global experts, not only from the case study countries but also from Brazil, China and other parts of Asia and Latin America.

    A good practice for diversity is defined as a system, organization or process that, over time and space, maintains, enhances and creates crop genetic diversity, and ensures its availability to and from farmers and other users. Drawing on experiences from a UNEP-GEF project on "Conservation and Sustainable Use of Wild and Cultivated Tropical Fruit Tree Diversity for Promoting Livelihoods, Food Security and Ecosystem Services", with case studies from India, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, the authors show how methods for identifying good practices are still evolving and challenges in scaling-up remain. They identify key principles effective as a strategy for mainstreaming good practice into development efforts. Few books draw principles and lessons learned from good practices. This book fills this gap by combining good practices from the research project on tropical fruit trees with chapters from external experts to broaden its scope and relevance.

    Tropical​_Fruit​_Tree​_Diversity.pdf (8 MB)
  • December 01, 2016
    ADB

    Nature-Based Solutions for Building Resilience in Towns and Cities: Case Studies from the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    Green infrastructure can play a significant role in offsetting losses from climate-related disasters and contribute to building resilience through rehabilitation and expansion of natural ecosystems within built areas.

    Urban populations are projected to increase from 54% to 66% of the global population by 2050, with close to 90% of the increase concentrated in Asia and Africa. Cities and towns—a growing source of greenhouse gas emissions—will need to address challenges posed by climate change. A nature-based approach in identifying climate change vulnerabilities and developing relevant adaptation options was conducted in three towns of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS).

    Working with local governments, nongovernment organizations, women’s groups, and professional associations, town-wide adaptation measures were defined by overlaying climate change projections on town plans and zoning schemes for strategic infrastructure. This publication captures valuable experience and lessons from the project.

    nature​-based​-solutions.pdf (6 MB)
  • November 28, 2016
    UNDP

    Guidance Note | Municipal Solid Waste Management in Crisis and Post-Crisis Setting

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    This guidance note aims to support Government counterparts and strengthen UNDP Country Offices’ and implementing partners’ capacities to plan, design and implement projects for municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in crisis or post-crisis settings, as part of UNDP’s early recovery response.

    The Guidance Note focuses in particular on livelihoods recovery and local government service delivery. It is assumed that readers do not have extensive experience in the area of MSWM. The guidance note is intended to inform UNDP Country Offices and implementing partners on the type of programmes UNDP could support in the area of MSWM in an early recovery setting, and provide information on how to plan, design and implement such projects.

    Click here for more detail.

    GuidanceNote​_Solid​_Waste​_Management.pdf (2 MB)
  • November 15, 2016
    UNDP

    From MDGs to Sustainable Development For All: Lessons from 15 Years of Practice

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    In 2015, world leaders set out to defy the odds, committing themselves to achieve 17 ambitious and far-reaching Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030. This was not the first time the world had attempted to raise the trajectory of human progress by employing Global Goals. In 2000, world leaders blazed a trail by adopting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The MDGs were the first attempt to use Global Goals to capture and advance the shared interest we all have, in a more just, peaceful and prosperous world.

    Click here for more detail.

    From the MDGs to SD4All.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 11, 2016
    WWF

    The Mekong River in the Economy Report

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    The Mekong River in the Economy report aims to reframe the debate around development and river resources management, guiding policy makers towards increased sustainability as well as continued growth.

    The two are not incompatible, but interdependent. The report lays out the benefits of integrating planning in a series of short narratives, highlighting the major risks and opportunities for different sectors within each Lower Mekong Basin country and illustrating how one actor’s development decisions are felt through the entire river system.

    WWF 2016​-Mekong River in the Economy.pdf (6 MB)
  • November 09, 2016
    UNDP

    Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs

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    This UNDP-World Bank Report pulls together the main lessons learned from the MDG Reviews for the UN system and for its engagement at the country level, which took place at the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB). The Reviews, which brought together UN and World Bank Group staff, systematically identified the country situation, the bottlenecks to MDG attainment, and potential solutions to be implemented. Since many MDGs have been absorbed into the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), many of the observations and solutions provided could prove useful to the implementation of the SDGs.

    Click here for more detail.

    Transitioning from the MDGs to the SDGs.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 02, 2016
    UNDP

    Adaptive Farms, Resilient Tables: Building secure food systems and celebrating distinct culinary traditions in a world of climate uncertainty

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    As the world gets hotter and rainfall more erratic, the type and availability of ingredients for daily meals are changing. 

    With support from the Government of Canada and the Global Environment Facility’s Least Developed Countries Fund, the Canada-UNDP Climate Change Adaptation Facility (CCAF) has been supporting six least developed countries and small island developing states (Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Haiti, Mali, Niger and Sudan) to strengthen climate resilience and enhance food security. 

    Click here for more detail.

    CCAF​-Cookbook ​-FinalDraft​-29Oct.pdf (10 MB)
  • November 01, 2016
    GIZ

    Advancing nationally determined contributions (NDCs) through climate-friendly refrigeration and air-conditioning

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     At the 28th Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol (MP) in October 2016 in Kigali, parties agreed to phase down hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) emissions over the next three decades, thereby building a fundamental pillar to achieving the ultimate goal set out in the Paris Agreement about a year earlier. According to an analysis by G. Velders et al (2016), the Kigali Amendment will avoid nearly 90 per cent of the temperature increase that HFCs could have caused.

    The following guidance assists policymakers to design national mitigation strategies for their refrigeration, air conditioning and foam (RAC&F) sector to meet the increasing ambition levels expected in revised NDCs. By aligning efforts taken under the two relevant international regimes, the UNFCCC and the Montreal Protocol, the RAC&F sector can make a significant contribution towards reaching the 2°C target, or even better, the enhanced 1,5°C target.

    giz​_2016​_advancing​_ndcs​_through​_climate​_friendly​_refrigeration.pdf (2 MB)
  • November 01, 2016
    World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

    Integrated systems research for sustainable smallholder agriculture in the Central Mekong

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    This book summarizes the achievements as well as some of the challenges faced while implementing integrated systems research to support the sustainable development of smallholder farming in the uplands of the Mekong region. It describes how CGIAR centres and national and local partners collaborated to test options to increase farm productivity in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam, and how field trials in Xishuangbanna, China; Son La, Viet Nam; and, Luang Prabang, Laos, showed that agroforestry and home-based vegetable gardens, among other interventions, could contribute to reduced land degradation and erosion. Efforts were also made to address the marginalization of ethnic minority farmers from agricultural and rural development. The book also discusses lessons learned in the research, including what did not work and possible reasons for that. Integrated systems research often requires ‘doing things differently’, which can lead to resistance among those involved. Also, implementing processes such as establishing and working together through multi-stakeholder platforms, was challenging and not always easy. However, some interesting new partnerships have emerged from this experience.

    Humidtropics​_Raneri.pdf (4 MB)
  • November 01, 2016
    German Development Institute (DIE)

    Green Finance: Actors, challenges and policy recommendations

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    Green finance represents a positive shift in the global economy’s transition to sustainability through the financing of public and private green investments and public policies that support green initiatives. Two main tasks of green finance are to internalise environmental externalities and to reduce risk perceptions in order to encourage investments that provide environmental benefits.

    The major actors driving the development of green finance include banks, institutional investors and international financial institutions as well as central banks and financial regulators. Some of these actors implement policy and regulatory measures for different asset classes to support the greening of the financial system, such as priority-lending requirements, below-market-rate finance via interest-rate subsidies or preferential central bank refinancing opportunities. Although estimations of the actual financing needs for green investments vary significantly between different sources, public budgets will fall far short of the required funding. For this reason, a large amount of private capital is needed.

    However, mobilising capital for green investments has been limited due to several microeconomic challenges such as problems in internalising environmental externalities, information asymmetry, inadequate analytical capacity and lack of clarity in the definition of “green”. There are maturity mismatches between long-term green investments and the relatively short-term time horizons of savers and – even more important – investors. In addition, financial and environmental policy approaches have often not been coordinated. Moreover, many governments do not clearly signal how and to what extent they promote the green transition.

    In order to increase the flow of private capital for green investment, the following measures are crucial. First, it is necessary to design an enabling environment facilitating green finance, including the business climate, rule of law and investment regime. Second, the definition of green finance needs to be more transparent. Third, standards and rules for disclosure would promote developing green finance assets. For all asset classes – bank credits, bonds and secured assets – voluntary principles and guidelines for green finance need to be implemented and monitored. Fourth, because voluntary guidelines may not be sufficient, they need to be complemented by financial and regulatory incentives. Fifth, financial and environmental policies as well as regulatory policies should be better coordinated, as has happened in China.

    DIE​_Green Finance​_Actors, Challenges, Policy Recommendations.pdf (1 MB)
  • October 10, 2016
    ASEAN

    ASEAN Strategic Plan for Culture and Arts 2016 – 2025

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    One of the goals of the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC) Blueprint is to forge solidarity and unity in the ASEAN region by building a common identity that supports greater understanding and mutual respect among the peoples of the ASEAN region. The ASCC Blueprint has effectively guided the culture sector’s initiatives, which “are deemed highly relevant in achieving the strategic objective of creating a sense of belonging, of consolidating unity in diversity, and of deepening mutual understanding among the ASEAN Member States”. Through the targets set by the ASCC Blueprint, the culture sector has likewise pushed for the conservation, preservation and safeguarding of the ASEAN community’s cultural heritage.

    19.​-October​-2016​-ASEAN​-Strategic​-Plan​-for​-Culture​-and​-Arts​-2016​-2025.pdf (2 MB)
  • October 01, 2016
    ADB

    ADB - Disaster Risk in Asia and the Pacific: Assessment, Management and Finance

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    This report summarizes the proceedings of 3 events: the ADB-OECD Forum on Disaster Risk Financing, and the Global Seminar on Disaster Risk Financing in September 2015, and the Asian Forum of Insurance Regulators Roundtable in April 2016.

    Click here for detial report.

     

    Source: ADB

    disaster​-risk​-asia​-and​-pacific.pdf (1 MB)
  • September 15, 2016
    ADB

    Asian Development Outlook 2016 Update: Meeting the Low-Carbon Growth Challenge

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    Growth has held up in developing Asia despite a difficult external environment. The region is expected to grow steadily at 5.7% in 2016 and 2017, the forecasts in this Update unchanged from Asian Development Outlook 2016.

    Follow the link for more detial.

    ado2016​-update.pdf (6 MB) ado2016​-update​-highlights.pdf (793 KB)
  • September 13, 2016
    ASEAN

    Master Plan on ASEAN Connectivity 2025

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    Connectivity in ASEAN encompasses the physical (transport, ICT and energy), institutional (trade, investment and services liberalisation), and people-to-people linkages (education, culture and tourism) that are the foundational supportive means to achieving the economic, political-security and socio-cultural pillars of an integrated ASEAN Community.

    Master​-Plan​-on​-ASEAN​-Connectivity​-20251.pdf (2 MB)
  • September 09, 2016
    Tropenbos International and EcoAgriculture Partners

    Guidelines-Participatory Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation of Multistakeholder Platforms in Integrated Landscape Initiatives

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    Integrated landscape initiatives often involve multi-stakeholder platforms. These are meant to enable discussions, negotiations and joint planning between stakeholders from various sectors in a given landscape. With growing investmentsn such platforms, there is a need for simple and affordable methods to aid their planning, monitoring and evaluation (PME). This report presents such a method, providing practical guidelines for participatory PME workshops based on three tools.

    Guidelines ​- Participatory Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation of Multistakeholder Platforms in Integrated Landscape Initiatives ​- 2016 Trobenos Int..pdf (2 MB)
  • September 01, 2016
    Mekong Institute

    Mekong Development Report 2016

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    Launched in 1998, the East-West Economic Corridor—encompassing the less developed provinces of Myanmar, Lao PDR, Thailand, and Vietnam—is one of the flagship initiatives of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) in order to improve the economic situation of these areas. Although countries in the EWEC have recently experienced sheer economic growth, unfortunately this growth is unbalanced with the industrial sector growing faster than the agricultural sector, contributing to worsening income inequality. This problem needs to be addressed and tackled urgently as the majority of population depends largely on agriculture, which is declining in its importance. Taken this issue into account, this comprehensive document focuses on three specific agricultural value chains in three target provinces - a rice value chain in Khammouane province of Lao PDR, a coffee value chain in Quang Tri province of Vietnam, and a maize value chain in Kayin State of Myanmar – in order to address prospects and constraints for value chain development, examine costs and margin for each actor in the value chain, and suggest actions to minimize the constraints and maximize the prospects.

    Mekong​_Development​_Report​_r261016.pdf (12 MB)
  • August 02, 2016
    Asian Development Bank

    Greater Mekong Subregion Statistics on Growth, Infrastructure and Trade (Second Edition)

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    The document builds on the first edition, with improved quantity and quality of data. The booklet begins with highlights—a snapshot of the subregion’s performance from 1992 to 2014—growth in output and merchandise trade, developments in information and communication technology, and trends in subregional integration. The five chapters feature macroeconomic data; connectivity indicators in transport, global shipping, and information and communication technology; indicators for transport, trade structure in merchandise and services; and indicators in logistics performance, doing business, competitiveness, trade costs, and trade facilitation.

    ADB 2016 ​-GMS​-Statistics​-2nd​-ed.pdf (867 KB)
  • July 17, 2016
    UNEP

    Food Systems and Natural Resources

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    Food systems are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic global commitment to eradicate poverty and hunger while ensuring healthy, prosperous and fulfilling lives. The food we grow, produce, consume, trade, transport, store and sell is the essential connecting thread between people, prosperity, and planet. We therefore need ‘resource-smart’ food systems. Food systems crucially depend on natural resources: land, soil, water, terrestrial and marine biodiversity, minerals (essential nutrients for crops and animals) and fossil fuels. The use of these natural resources goes beyond primary food production, e.g. fresh water for processing and biomass for packaging or cooking. If we want ensure all people have safe and nutritious food, in appropriate amounts, these natural resources need to be managed sustainably and used efficiently, while reducing environmental impacts. The food sector is globally the dominant user of a number of natural resources, particularly land, biodiversity, fresh water, nitrogen and phosphorus. Food systems, and food production in particular, are also a major driver of a number of environmental impacts, such as the loss of biodiversity, soil degradation, water depletion and greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the people who directly or indirectly manage our food systems are also the largest group of natural resource managers in the world and could become critical agents of change in the transformation of current consumption and production systems.

    ​-Food​_systems​_and​_natural​_resources​-2016Food​_Systems​_and​_Natural​_Resources.pdf.pdf (9 MB)
  • July 15, 2016
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB - Natural Capital and the Rule of Law: Proceedings of the ADB Second Asian Judges Symposium on Environment 2013

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    This publication captures the proceedings of the Second Asian Judges Symposium: "Natural Capital and the Rule of Law" held 3–5 December 2013 in Manila, the Philippines.

     

    natural​-capital​-and​-rule​-law.pdf (2 MB)
  • July 01, 2016
    UNEP

    Unlocking the Sustainable Potential Of Land Resources Evaluation Systems, Strategies and Tools

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    This report provides an introduction to land evaluation systems, strategies and tools necessary for “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The text focuses strongly on how to better match land use with its sustainable potential, in order to reduce the amount of land required to meet human needs, minimize land degradation, and cost-effectively restore already degraded lands. The report provides information that private landowners can use to increase long-term productivity and profitability, while at the same time addressing global objectives defined through land-related Sustainable Development Goals, and particularly 15.3 (land degradation neutrality).

    land​_resources​_full​_report​_english.pdf (3 MB)
  • July 01, 2016
    Climate Focus

    Fostering Climate Action through Trade-Related Policy Instruments Final report: Delivery strategies and support tools

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  • June 17, 2016
    Ke Ai Advancing Research Evolving Science

    Approaches to low carbon development in China and India

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    Low carbon development has gained policy prominence and is a concern of both environment and development policy globally and in China and India. This paper discusses the role of China and India as important global actors in light of development imperatives in the two countries. The article then looks at emerging approaches in the two countries related to financing, science, technology & innovation policy, and sub-national actions. The objective is to review efforts in China and India for contributing to learning experiences for other countries. The final section discussed the ways forward in terms of examining the role of China and India in terms of national policy strengthening as well as in global agenda setting. Implementation of sub-national initiatives in both countries faces challenges due to lack of adequate financing as well as knowledge such as greenhouse gas inventories and disaggregated resource and socio-economic assessments. Both India and China are making efforts in technology and innovation domains to set foot on a trajectory of low carbon development with varying degrees of success. In finance, both China and India have experimented with various instruments—the key difference is that China has taken the support of regulation more while India has leaned on to market based instruments. Both China and India are moving on an encouraging track regarding low carbon development with fairly well-designed domestic policies and consistent international engagement.

    1​-s2.0​-S167492781630034X​-main.pdf (300 KB)
  • June 15, 2016
    ADB

    ADB - Urban Development in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    Urbanization is set to play an ever greater role in the development of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries, transforming their economies and providing support to green economic growth.

    Follow the link for more detial.

  • June 15, 2016
    Sciences Po and IOM

    The State of Environmental Migration 2015 – A review of 2014

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    The State of Environmental Migration series gathers the expertise of researchers, students and professionals to provide an annual assessment of the changing nature and dynamics of environment- and climate-related migration throughout the world.

    state​_environmental​_migration​_2014​_0​_0.pdf (5 MB)
  • June 15, 2016
    ESCAP, IOM, ILO, OCHA, UN Women, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNFPA, UNHCR, UN-ACI, UNICEF, UNODC, WHO, World Bank

    Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015

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    The Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015: Migrants' Contributions to Development, produced by the Asia-Pacific Regional Thematic Working Group on International Migration, including Human Trafficking, provides an insight into how labour migration, the dominant migration trend in the Asia-Pacific region, can contribute to development in countries of origin and destination in the Asia-Pacific region. It reviews the main migration trends in the Asia-Pacific region; considers how migrants impact on GDP growth, employment, and wages in countries of destination; and considers how the positive impacts of migration can be maximized, while minimizing the negative trends. In general, it finds that migration is a benefit to countries of origin, destination, and migrants themselves; however, further contributions are hampered by the vulnerability of migrant workers to exploitation. It calls for migration policies and forms of international cooperation that are harmonized with development priorities and international human rights and labour standards to ensure that migration is a benefit for all.

    SDD AP Migration Report report v6​-1​-E.pdf (5 MB)
  • June 15, 2016
    UNDP

    Integrated Planning and Sustainable Development: Challenges and Opportunities

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    This Synthesis Report and the eight country studies on which it draws, have been prepared through the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE), with funds from the European Commission. The report illustrates the many different sustainable development pathways that countries are pursuing in line with national priorities and contexts. Its country-based evidence and non-prescriptive findings for policymakers and practitioners highlight the need for integrated and coherent development policies, while illustrating a range of inclusive green economy solutions. As such, this report represents an important addition to the global community’s demand-driven resources for advancing the 2030 Agenda.

    Click here for more detail.

    PAGE​_Integrated​_Planning​_and​_SD​_SynthesisReport.pdf (3 MB)
  • June 01, 2016
    FAO

    Principles for the assessment of livestock impacts on biodiversity. Version 1

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    Livestock Environmental Assessment and Performance (LEAP) Partnership

    The provision of guidance for the quantitative assessment of biodiversity in live¬stock and other sectors is an emerging area of work. This document represents an initial step in which international experts with various backgrounds shared their views on biodiversity assessment. The general objective of this document was to de-velop principles applicable to different assessment methods in order to guarantee a minimum level of soundness, transparency, scientific relevance, and completeness. These principles can be used to identify crucial elements of livestock systems that affect biodiversity, to monitor changes and make improvements, and to produce assessment results for internal or external communication.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i6492e.pdf (6 MB)
  • June 01, 2016
    UNEP, Global Infrastructure Basel (GIB)

    Sustainable Infrastructure and Finance

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    Infrastructure is often referred to as the backbone of the global economy and plays a fundamental role in societies by enhancing the quality of life and increasing productivity. In addition to its effects on society and the economy, infrastructure can have significant impacts on the environment, depending on the choice of infrastructure.

    Approximately 75% of the infrastructure that will be in place in 2050 does not exist today. Getting such a scale of infrastructure development right will be critical to whether or not the world locks into a high- or low-carbon growth path. Therefore, if the world wants to meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), adequate infrastructure development is part of the answer.

    To foster the development of sustainable and resilient infrastructure, a clear standard to help integrating sustainability and resilience criteria in infrastructure projects is crucial. Such a standard for sustainable and resilient infrastructure projects would lead to benefits for both projects developers and financiers, and help address the current infrastructure investment barriers.

    Sustainable​_Infrastructure​_and​_Finance.pdf (665 KB)
  • June 01, 2016
    International Energy Agency

    Next Generation Wind and Solar Power

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    Wind and solar photovoltaics (PV) are currently the fastest-growing sources of electricity globally. A "next generation" phase of deployment is emerging, in which wind and solar PV are technologically mature and economically affordable.

    The success of variable renewable energy (VRE) is also bringing new challenges to the fore. Electricity generation from both technologies is constrained by the varying availability of wind and sunshine. This can make it difficult to maintain the necessary balance between electricity supply and consumption at all times.

    As these variable renewables enter this next generation of deployment, the issue of system and market integration becomes a critical priority for renewables policy and energy policy more broadly. The paper highlights that this will require strategic action in three areas:

    - System-friendly deployment, aiming to maximise the net benefit of wind and solar power for the entire system
    - Improved operating strategies, such as advanced renewable energy forecasting and enhanced scheduling of power plants
    - Investment in additional flexible resources, comprising demand-side resources, electricity storage, grid infrastructure and flexible generation

    In addition, the paper argues that unlocking the contribution of system-friendly deployment calls for a paradigm shift in the economic assessment of wind and solar power. The traditional focus on the levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) – a measure of cost for a particular generating technology at the level of a power plant – is no longer sufficient. Next-generation approaches need to factor in the system value of electricity from wind and solar power – the overall benefit arising from the addition of a wind or solar power generation source to the power system. System value is determined by the interplay of positives and negatives including reduced fuel costs, reduced carbon dioxide and other pollutant emissions costs, or higher costs of additional grid infrastructure.

    In addition to general analysis and recommendations, the paper also includes summaries of three case studies in China, Denmark and South Africa.

    NextGenerationWindandSolarPower.pdf (2 MB)
  • May 31, 2016
    UNDP

    2015 UNDP-GEF Annual Performance Report

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    This eighth annual performance report of the UNDP Global Environmental Finance (UNDP-GEF) Unit has three primary goals: one, to provide a snapshot of progress made toward multiple development and environment benefits by projects in each region in 2015 – see Demonstrating Impact; two, to highlight progress made in addressing women, work and the environment – see Gender in Action; and three, to demonstrate the services UNDP provides to the vertical funds that it is accredited to, in particular the Global Environment Facility family of funds – see UNDP-GEF Unit. In addition, development and environment benefits that have been realized through projects and that can be reasonably aggregated at the regional and/or global levels are presented in a series of infographics.  This report demonstrates how investments in the environment in 141 countries are already delivering development benefits. 

    Click here for more detail.

    2015 Annual Performance Report of UNDP​-Supported GEF​-Financed Projects​_DigitalFile.pdf (6 MB)
  • May 18, 2016
    UNEP

    The Open Ocean: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 5)

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  • May 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    Community forestry-based climate change adaptation: A practitioner’s brief

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    In 2014, the USAID Climate Change Adaptation Project Preparation Facility for Asia and the Pacific(USAID Adapt Asia-Pacific ) teamed up with RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests to establish ademonstration site in the Bishnupur community of Sarlahi district of Nepal, on planning, financing andimplementing community forestry-based climate change adaptation (CF-CCA)

    community​_forestry​_climate​_change​_adapatation​_brief​_2016​_05​_en.pdf (1 MB)
  • May 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    Forests and climate change after Paris: An Asia-Pacific perspective

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    The 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was held in Paris, France, 30 November to 11 December 2015. COP 21 and the resulting Paris Agreement have been seen by many as a turning point in international climate negotiations. 

    forests​_and​_climate​_change​_after​_paris​_2016​_05​_en.pdf (4 MB)
  • May 01, 2016
    IGES

    Strengthening EIA in Asia

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    This report was prepared for the Asia EIA Conference 2016 organised on 10 May by the Ministry of the Environment, Japan (MOEJ). The conference was held under the theme of enhancing EIA as a sustainable development planning tool in Asia in collaboration with the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA).

    Click here for more detail.

    Strengthening​_EIA​_in​_Asia​_2016​_IGES.pdf (3 MB)
  • May 01, 2016
    IISD

    State of Sustainability Initiatives Review: Standards and the Blue Economy

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    The SSI Review: Standards and the Blue Economy takes a deep dive into the market and performance trends of the 9 most prevalent seafood certification schemes operating in the wild catch and aquaculture sectors. The Review provides a reference point for buyers, producers, policy makers and consumers in deciding how best to apply voluntary standards in their own decision-making processes.

    ssi​-blue​-economy​-2016.pdf (20 MB)
  • May 01, 2016
    UNEP

    Green Finance and Developing Countries: Needs, Concerns and Innovations

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    Green finance is a strategy for financial sector and broader sustainable development that is relevant around the world. But the context differs considerably for different countries. Developing countries, notably those with underdeveloped financial systems, face particular challenges in financing national development priorities.

    Broadly, concern and action to align financing to sustainable development is concentrated in three areas:

    • Preventing the financing of illicit practices or profiting from weak enforcement.
    • Unlocking opportunities for green investment.
    • Exploring solutions to dilemmas and trade-offs.

    The paper reports out on the build out of developing country work following the global report, "The Financial System We Need“ launched at the IMF Annual Meetings in Lima in October 2015. In particular, the paper sets out some of the needs and concerns particular to developing countries, as well as innovations that have emerged to address some of these specific aspects. The paper highlights the importance developing country actors place on embedding green into a broader sustainable finance lens, the significance of international developments in greening the financial system given their dependence on foreign direct investment, and the evidence of and potential for leapfrogging in aligning their financial systems to sustainable development, for example through the deployment of fintech.

    Green​_Finance​_for​_Developing​_Countries​-1.pdf (2 MB)
  • April 13, 2016
    Asian Development Bank

    ASEAN–ADB Cooperation Toward the ASEAN Community

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    For the past 5 decades, ASEAN and ADB have both supported poverty reduction, sustainable development, and regional cooperation and integration in Southeast Asia. This publication provides an overview of cooperation between ADB and ASEAN, and how it has contributed to a more connected, competitive, and integrated region.

    ASEAN–ADB Cooperation Toward The ASEAN Community.pdf (5 MB)
  • April 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    Forest landscape restoration for Asia-Pacific forests

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    The Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) approach, which is still in its nascent stages of development, is rapidly gaining attention as a more appropriate way to restore both degraded forests as well as the surrounding degraded landscape. The great value of this approach is that it integrates forest restoration actions with the desirable objectives of the landscape, and it is undertaken with the full participation of the people who will have a role in the management of the restored areas over the longer term. So, FLR brings together social, environmental and economic considerations in restoring the forests and lands, converse to just restoring an isolated patch of forest without taking into consideration the people in the area. With people having no stake in the forest, the long-term success of the restoration work is not assured.

    forest​_landscape​_restoration​_for​_asia​-pacific​_forests​_2016​_04​_eng.pdf (3 MB)
  • March 23, 2016
    IUCN

    A global standard for the identification of Key Biodiversity Areas

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    The Global Standard for the Identification of Key Biodiversity Areas (IUCN 2016) sets out globally agreed criteria for the identification of KBAs worldwide. The KBA Standard establishes a consultative, science-based process for KBA identification, founded on the consistent application of global criteria with quantitative thresholds that have been developed through an extensive consultation exercise spanning several years.

    Sites qualify as global KBAs if they meet one or more of 11 criteria, clustered into five categories: threatened biodiversity; geographically restricted biodiversity; ecological integrity; biological processes; and, irreplaceability. The KBA criteria can be applied to species and ecosystems in terrestrial, inland water and marine environments. Although not all KBA criteria may be relevant to all elements of biodiversity, the thresholds associated with each of the criteria may be applied across all taxonomic groups (other than micro-organisms) and ecosystems.

    Click here for more detial.

    2016​-048.pdf (701 KB)
  • March 01, 2016
    UNEP

    Natural Capital Assessments at the National and Sub-National level: A Guide for Environmental Practitioners

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    Natural capital refers to the stocks of the Earth's natural assets and resources, such as soil, water, air and biodiversity.

    This Guide for Environmental Practitioners from UNEP is a guidance document which's presents eight steps to completing Natural Capital Assessments to inform decision making that supports sustainable economic growth.

    Natural Capital Assessments ​- Guide For Enviro Practictioners ​- UNEP 2016.pdf (3 MB)
  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Large Marine Ecosystems: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 4)

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  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary Aquifers and Groundwater Systems of Small Island Developing States: Status and Trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 1)

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  • January 15, 2016
    UNEP

    Transboundary river basins: Status and trends: Summary for policy makers (Volume 3)

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  • January 13, 2016
    MRC

    MRC: 20 Years of C20 Yearso of Coooperaption eration

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    The year 2015 marks the 20th anniversary of the Mekong Agreement on Cooperation for the Sustainable Development of the Mekong River Basin. Signed in Chiang Rai on April 5, 1995, the agreement between Cambodia, Lao PDR, Thailand and Viet Nam

    20th​-year​-MRC​-2016.pdf (6 MB)
  • January 12, 2016
    Asian Development Bank

    Southeast Asia and the Economics of Global Climate Stabilization

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    This ADB study focuses on five countries of Southeast Asia that collectively account for 90% of regional GHG emissions inrecent years—Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Viet Nam. It applies two global dynamiceconomy–energy–environment models under an array of scenarios that reflect potential regimes forregulating global GHG emissions through 2050. The modeling identifies the potential economic costs of climate inaction for the region, how the countries can most e'ciently achieve GHG emission mitigation, and the consequences of mitigation, both in terms of benefits and costs. Drawing on the modeling results, the study analyzes climate-related policies and identifies how further action can be taken to ensure low-carbon growth.

    ADB​-SEA Economics Global Climate Stabilization.pdf (7 MB)
  • January 01, 2016
    RECOFTC

    The role of community forestry in climate change adaptation in the ASEAN region

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    This paper summarizes key discussions from the 1st ASEAN-Swiss Partnership on Social Forestry and Climate Change (ASFCC) Learning Group workshop organized by RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests in August 2015. The discussions highlight a number of ways community forestry (CF) can support local communities in adapting to climate change.

    Click here for more detail.

    the​_role​_of​_cf​_in​_climate​_change​_adaptation​_in​_asean​_2015​_english.pdf (2 MB)
  • January 01, 2016
    Mekong Institute

    Mekong Institute: Strategic Plan 2016-2020

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    This ‘Strategic Plan 2016 – 2020’ provides theframework that will guide MI’s work to focus on threeregional development themes, together with the issuesand strategies it has identified as being cross cuttingand relevant to all three themes. The plan next setsout the approach that will be taken for monitoring andevaluating performance, and for integrating continuouslearning into all activities. The concluding sectiongives an overview of the institutional framework thatwill guide how MI organizes its work and resources.A final institutional goal defines MI’s commitment tostrive continually for increased internal capacity toachieve development results.

    MI​_Strategic​_Plan​_2016​_2020.pdf (3 MB)
  • January 01, 2016
    FAO

    Towards the implementation of the SSF Guidelines in the Southeast Asia region

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    Following the endorsement of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines) by the FAO Committee on Fisheries (COFI) in June 2014 and in line with paragraph 13.6 of the document itself, promoting the development regional plans of action for their implementation, a regional workshop was held in Southeast Asia to discuss implementation of the SSF Guidelines.

    The workshop was co-organized by the Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries (MMAF) of the Republic of Indonesia and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) and the FAO Bay of Bengal Large Marine Ecosystem (BOBLME) Project. Some 116participants attended the workshop representing governments, regional and international organizations, fisherfolk organizations, civil society organization, non-governmental organizations, academia and other relevant actors. The workshop acknowledged the importance of the SSF Guidelines for the Southeast Asia region and agreed on a number of priority action areas for inclusion in a regional plan of action to be developed with the support of SEAFDEC. National plans of action will also be promoted, and the workshop outcomes will be reflected in the implementation planning of the BOBLME Strategic Action Plan (SAP). FAO will continue to support these processes in collaboration with its partners with a view to securing sustainable small-scale fisheries and enhancing the sector’s contribution to food and nutrition security, poverty alleviation and natural resources management.

    Click here for more detail.

    a​-i5253e.pdf (3 MB)
  • December 04, 2015
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Landscape Partnerships for Sustainable Development: Achieving the SDGs through Integrated Landscape Management

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    To achieve the SDGs by 2030 will require a radically different paradigm of development than was applied to the Millennium Development Goals. A new approach that breaks down sectoral barriers, capitalizes on synergies in land uses and human development, and strengthens coordination and participation of a wide range of stakeholders is needed. Integrated landscape management (ILM) is that approach. This paper makes the case for how we get there.

    LPFN​_WhitePaper​_112415c​_lowres.pdf (880 KB)
  • December 01, 2015
    International Organization for Migration (IOM)

    Migration Initiatives 2016

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    Migration Initiatives is the main publication illustrating both the wide scope of IOM activities and the impact that the Organization aims to have in migration governance worldwide. For the first time ever, Migration Initiatives 2016 is structured around the Migration Governance Framework principles and objectives to provide a comprehensive look at what IOM stands for and its contribution to improved migration governance for sustainable development. Accompanying the overview of IOM planned actions for 2016, Migration Initiatives features a compilation of funding requirements per country, region and sector of activities. Migration Initiatives sums up IOM planned interventions for 2016 in a comprehensive, innovative and looking-forward manner and defines the Organization’s activities to promote well-governed migration for the benefit of all.

    migration​_initiatives2016.pdf (8 MB)
  • December 01, 2015
    ADB

    Asian Economic Integration Report 2015: How Can Special Economic Zones Catalyze Economic Development?

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    Economic zones have played a key role in economic development in many Asian economies and can be catalysts for economic development, provided the right business environment and policies are put in place.

    In Asia, special economic zones (SEZs) can facilitate trade, investment, and policy reform at a time the region is experiencing a slowdown in trade and economic growth.

    Click here for more detail.

    asian​-economic​-integration​-report​-2015.pdf (6 MB)
  • November 30, 2015
    UNEP

    Green Energy Choices: The benefits, risks and trade-offs of low-carbon technologies for electricity production

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    Faced with an expected doubling in world demand for energy by 2050, massive investment will be needed to develop and install systems that can not only meet the energy needs of nine billion people but at the same time reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollution, toxicity, the impacts on land, water and other eco-systems. This investment need presents the perfect opportunity to select the best electricity generation technologies to meet these aims (Chapter 1). This report consists of this Technical Summary, and ten chapters constituting the full report. It identifies important environmental characteristics of low-carbon electricity generation technologies and provides decision makers with essential information on these characteristics. It assesses the impacts of building, operating and dismantling renewable power generation technologies such as hydropower, wind power, photovoltaics, and concentrated solar power on human health, ecosystems and natural resources. It also assesses the impacts of coal- and gas-fired power with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The impacts of these technologies are compared with those of modern coal and gas-fired power without CCS, but with state-of-the-art pollution control.

    ​-green​_energy​_choices​_full​_report​_english.pdf (41 MB)
  • November 18, 2015
    Oxfam

    Working Paper on Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of Hydropower Development Lower Mekong Basin

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    This working paper is a revised, condensed version of the report ‘Planning Approaches for Water Resources Development in the Lower Mekong Basin’ by Portland State University, Oregon and Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai (Robert Costanza et al. 2011).

    Working Paper on Economic, Environmental and Social Impacts of Hydropower Development Lower Mekong Basin.pdf (855 KB)
  • November 11, 2015
    GMS Core Environment Program

    Investing in Natural Capital for a Sustainable Future in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This report aims to demonstrate the compelling need to increase investments in natural capital in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) and identifies actions now being taken regionally and nationally to manage natural capital. It also proposes a guiding framework for promoting investments and actions by GMS countries to secure natural capital and thus ensure sustainable and inclusive growth in the subregion.

    Investing in Natural Capital Report.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 01, 2015
    IGES

    The Paris Climate Agreement and Beyond: Linking Short-term Climate Actions to Long-term Goals

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    This report discusses possible ways to enhance the Parties’ contributions to climate mitigation and finance, and draws lessons for the international negotiations leading up to the Paris climate agreement. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of the dynamic nature of the climate regime, looking not only at the Paris climate agreement but also at the follow-up of the agreement (so-called “beyond”). This is critical to make the "nationally determined contribution" approach sufficiently effective to achieve the 2°C target. The report also covers the issues of market-based mechanisms and loss and damage as important components of a post-2020 climate regime.

    Click here for more detail.

    IGES​_the​-paris​_uni​_web.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 16, 2015
    Asian Development Bank

    Regional Investment Framework Implementation Plan - First Progress Report

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    This ADB report provides the status of the overall Regional Investment Framework Implementation Plan as of 30 June 2015, for all sectors, both investment and technical assistance projects.The Greater Mekong Subregion Regional Investment Framework Implementation Plan, 2014-2018 (RIF-IP) identifies a pipeline of 93 high priority investment and technical assistance projects from among the more than 200 projects included in the Greater Mekong Subregion Regional Investment Framework, 2013-2022 (RIF).

    RIF​-ip​-progress​-report.pdf (2 MB)
  • September 14, 2015
    Asian Development Bank

    Economic Analysis of Climate-Proofing Investment Projects

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    This ADB report describes the conduct of the cost-benefit analysis of climate proofing investment projects. An important message is that the presence of uncertainty about climate change does not invalidate the conduct of the economic analysis of investment projects, nor does it require a new type of economic analysis. However, the presence of uncertainty does require a different type of decision-making process in which technical and economic expertise combine to present decision makers with the best possible information on the economic efficiency of alternative designs of investment projects.

    economic​-analysis​-climate​-proofing​-projects.pdf (3 MB)
  • September 10, 2015
    Asian Development Bank

    Greater Mekong Subregion Urban Development Strategic Framework 2015 – 2022

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    This ADB report features Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) Urban Development Strategic Framework, 2015 – 2022. It sets out a broad framework to encourage and facilitate a coordinated approach to the development of urban areas throughout the GMS. The framework includes three pillars: (i) planning and development of key urban areas, (ii) planning and development of border areas, and (iii) capacity development in urban planning and management. Underlying these are four crosscutting themes—green development and climate change resilience, disaster risk management, inclusive development, and competitiveness. The GMS Urban Development Strategic Framework also provides the context for ongoing and planned projects in the six GMS member countries.

    gms​-urbandev​-framework​-2015​-2022.pdf (4 MB)
  • September 10, 2015
    ADB

    Greater Mekong Subregion Statistics On Growth, Connectivity and Sustainable Development (First Edition)

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    The booklet has five chapters. Chapter One presents the country progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Chapter Two is a regional and country overview of data on production, trade in goods and services, and foreign direct investment. Chapters Three and Four compile indicators in logistics performance, doing business, competitiveness and trade facilitation. Lastly, Chapter Five provides indicators for connectivity, focusing on the transport and information and communications technology sectors.

    gms​-statistics​-1st​-ed.pdf (1 MB)
  • September 01, 2015
    IGES

    Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals: From Agenda to Action

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    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the centrepiece of a new global agreement on what society seeks to become over the next fifteen years. This agreement envisages a world free from poverty and deprivation, and where the fundamental conditions for human prosperity—healthy ecosystems, a stable climate, and a clean environment—are safely maintained. However, the SDGs do not offer a plan for how to achieve such laudable objectives. This book joins a timely discussion on how the SDGs can be implemented. It deals with how the globally agreed goals can be adapted to national and local circumstances, and what actions can pave the way for achieving them. More specifically, the book focuses on how reforms in governance—the way in which authority is exercised and decisions are taken and executed—can bring the SDG agenda into action.

    Click here for more detail.

    00​_All​_Achieving​_the​_SDGs.pdf (4 MB)
  • August 19, 2015
    PACT

    Environmental Impact Assessment Comparative Analysis In Lower Mekong Countries

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    This Report examines existing laws, policies, regulations, and guidelines in each Lower Mekong country, and relevant literature, to answer the following four questions :

    • What are the specific provisions for public participation in EIA?
    • To what degree are the existing national EIA frameworks already harmonized across the Lower Mekong countries?
    • What major gaps exist, particularly with respect to public participation processes?
    • What specific recommendations can be made for strengthening the EIA process nationally and regionally, specifically with respect to meaningful public participation and stakeholder engagement?

    This Report also examines some regional EIA approaches of the Mekong River Commission, as well as the Asian Development Bank‘s Safeguard Policy Statement (2009).

    Environmental Impact Assessment Comparative Analysis In Lower Mekong Countries.pdf (4 MB)
  • July 24, 2015
    Asian Development Bank

    Renewable Energy Developments and Potential for the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This ADB report was produced under the technical assistance project Promoting Renewable Energy, CleanFuels, and Energy Efficiency in the Greater Mekong Subregion (TA 7679). It focused on renewable energydevelopments and potential in five countries in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS): Cambodia, theLao People’s Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, and Viet Nam. It assessed the potential of solar,wind, biomass, and biogas as sources of renewable energy. Technical considerations include the degree andintensity of solar irradiation, average wind speeds, backup capacity of grid systems, availability and quality ofagricultural land for biofuel crops, and animal manure concentrations for biogas digester systems. Most GMSgovernments have established plans for reaching these targets and have implemented policy, regulatory, andprogram measures to boost solar, wind, biomass, and biogas forms of renewable energy. Incentives for privatesector investment in renewable energy are increasingly emphasized.

    renewable​-energy​-developments​-gms.pdf (6 MB)
  • July 15, 2015
    Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment

    Driving Sustainable Development Through Better Infrastructure: Key Elements of A Transformation Program

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    Driving Sustainable Development Through Better Infrastructure: Key Elements of A Transformation Program

    Bhattacharya​-et​-al.​-2015.pdf (2 MB)
  • July 01, 2015
    IGES

    Greening Integration in Asia: How Regional Integration Can Benefit People and the Environment

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    Regional Integration is stepping up in Asia. The launch of the ASEAN community by the end of 2015 and the possible establishment of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) signal a new era of deepened regional integration. These and other regional initiatives will influence how Asia develops over the coming decades.

    Click here for more detail.

    IGESGreeningIntergrationAsiaV2015​_eng​_web.pdf (3 MB)
  • June 01, 2015
    United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

    Economic Valuation Of Wastewater: The Cost Of Action And The Cost Of No Action

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    This book presents the results of an analytical study on the economic valuation for wastewater, comparing the costof no action versus the cost of effective wastewater management.

    ​-Economic​_Valuation​_of​_Wastewater​_​_The​_Cost​_of​_Action​_and​_the​_Cost​_of​_No​_Action​-2015Wastewater​_Evaluation​_Report​_Mail.pdf.pdf (8 MB)
  • May 01, 2015
    World Resources Institute

    Scaling up Regreening: Six Steps to Success

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    Scaling Up Regreening: Six Steps to Success highlights the benefits of “regreening” and its widespread adoption in Senegal, Burkina Faso, Niger, Mali, northern Ethiopia and Malawi, and identifies six steps to scale up regreening practices in Africa and beyond.

    scaling​-regreening​-six​-steps​-success.pdf (6 MB)
  • April 15, 2015
    GMS Core Environment Program

    Strategic Environmental Assessment in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This brief promotes the value of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) to assist GMS decision makers to more effectively balance economic, social, and environmental considerations early in development planning processes. It draws on lessons from the GMS Core Environment Program’s (CEP) experience applying SEA for energy, land use, and subregional strategic planning processes.

    SEA in the GMS.pdf (1 MB)
  • April 15, 2015
    GMS Core Environment Program

    Green Freight in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This brief summarizes lessons learned from green freight feasibility analyses conducted under the GMS Core Environment Program between 2010 and 2014. It presents five key messages that policymakers and practitioners need to be aware of while developing strategies and projects to improve road freight fuel efficiency in the GMS. It also provides an overview of the GMS Core Environment Program’s Green Freight Initiative.

    Green Freight in the GMS.pdf (1 MB)
  • April 15, 2015
    GMS Core Environment Program

    Ecosystem-based Approaches to Address Climate Change Challenges in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    The brief summarizes the current state of GMS knowledge and experience on ecosystem-based approaches. It draws upon work of the GMS Core Environment Program and partner institutions, including findings from the regional workshop “Mainstreaming an Ecosystem-based Approach to Climate Change into Biodiversity Conservation Planning,” which took place 15–16 October 2013 in Ha Noi, Viet Nam.

    GMS EBA brief.pdf (1 MB)
  • April 01, 2015
    ASEAN

    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN

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    Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN (Rice, Maize and Cassava)

    The study on Promotion of Climate Resilience for Food Security in ASEAN.pdf (9 MB)
  • March 27, 2015
    FAO

    Developing an Environmental Monitoring System to Strengthen Fisheries and Aquaculture Resilience and Improve Early Warning in the Lower Mekong Basin

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    These proceedings report the result of a sub-regional consultation on the existence and effectiveness of environmental monitoring systems for fisheries and aquaculture in the Lower Mekong basin. The document also includes a baseline assessment of environmental monitoring systems in Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam, and the report of a regional workshop to discuss the assessments findings and future steps to improve an environmental monitoring and early warning system that will improve climate change adaptation in fisheries and aquaculture in the area.

    FAO​-Developing an Environmental Monitoring System.pdf (2 MB)
  • March 01, 2015
    Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, GGGI

    Looking for Green Jobs: The impact of green growth on employment

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    There are many claims and counter-claims about whether green growth creates or destroys jobs. But fully assessing the consequences of environmental policies for employment presents a considerable challenge, and at present it is not possible for policy-makers to assess conflicting claims about the quality and quantity of green jobs that have already been created, or may be created in the future. One approach would be to focus on changes in employment in industries that provide environmental goods and services. Another would be to count the jobs created when firms adopt technologies with less environmental impact and switch to less polluting inputs, regardless of their primary outputs. Both approaches can be helpful for assessing the direct impact on jobs and the scale of structural change required by the transition to green growth. But green policies also affect labour markets indirectly through supply chains and through changes in overall demand. The destruction of ‘brown jobs’ in polluting industries should also be taken into account. The consequences of green policies for labour markets working through macroeconomic channels – such as changes in labour productivity and the costs of employment – are often overlooked. This policy brief argues for a greater focus on these indirect channels, taking into account a country’s particular economic structure and labour market institutions. This is particularly important for comprehensively analysing the impact of green policies in developing countries.

    Looking​_for​_green​_jobs​_the​_impact​_of​_green​_growth​_on​_employment​_GGGI​_Grantham​_Research​_Institute​_on​_Climate​_Change​_on​_the​_Environment​_0.pdf (422 KB)
  • January 02, 2015
    Asian Development Bank

    Greater Mekong Subregion Regional Investment Framework Implementation Plan (2014-2018)

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    This ADB report features the Greater Mekong Subregion Regional Investment Framework Implementation Plan, 2014-2018 (RIF-IP). It identifies a robust pipeline of 92 high priority projects from among the more than 200 projects included in the Greater Mekong Subregion Regional Investment Framework, 2013-2022 (RIF). The total cost of the priority projects in the RIF-IP is estimated at US$30.1 billion, or approximately US$20 billion less than all of the projects included in the RIF.

    gms​-rif​-ip​-2014​-2018.pdf (551 KB)
  • January 01, 2015
    CIAT, CGIAR, CCAFS

    Towards climate resilience in agriculture for Southeast Asia: An overview for decision-makers

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    This sourcebook, and accompanying poster learning series, is aimed at policy makers, planners in government, local research administrators, civil society partners and researchers in Southeast Asia. Compiled and repackaged by Dr. Julian Gonsalves and a resource team, the Climate-Smart Agriculture (CSA) source book draws from a rich pool of literature from over 700 sources. The compilation provides succinct, relevant and timely information about climate challenges, and potential solutions from previously published work in a simplified or a shortened form from around the world. While the focus is on challenges specific to Southeast Asia, solutions may come from, or already have been tested elsewhere; it is for this reason that articles from around the world have been included, to demonstrate that adaptation efforts are already being implemented, and a wide range of approaches and strategies are available. This resource seeks to bridge the gap between what policy makers know, and what research shows can work on the ground to improve adaptation, increase productivity, enhance livelihoods, and contribute to sustainable development affected by climate change. The related poster series can be found here: http://hdl.handle.net/10568/71099.

    Towards climate resilience in agriculture for Southeast Asia.pdf (18 MB)
  • November 11, 2014
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Spatial Planning and Monitoring of Landscape Interventions: Maps to Link People with their Landscapes

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  • November 11, 2014
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    Ground-Based Photo-Monitoring of Landscape Changes Arising from Sustainable Land Management Practices

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    Aimed at sustainable land management researchers and practitioners, the method presented here uses photographs to track land-use changes in order to evaluate the progress and effectiveness of specific management practices. The user guide includes an overview of ground-based photo-monitoring, its capabilities and limitations and provides suggestions for those interested in adopting the methodology.

    GBPM​_UsersGuide​_10November2014.pdf (5 MB)
  • November 11, 2014
    OECD

    Towards Green Growth in Southeast Asia

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    Southeast Asia’s booming economy offers tremendous growth potential, but also large and interlinked economic, social and environmental challenges. The region’s current growth model is based in large part on natural resource exploitation, exacerbating these challenges. This report provides evidence that, with the right policies and institutions, Southeast Asia can pursue green growth and thus sustain the natural capital and environmental services, including a stable climate, on which prosperity depends.

    Carried out in consultation with officials and researchers from across the region, Towards Green Growth in Southeast Asia provides a framework for regional leaders to design their own solutions to move their countries towards green growth. While recognising the pressures that Southeast Asian economies face to increase growth, fight poverty and enhance well-being, the report acknowledges the links between all these dimensions and underscores the window of opportunity that the region has now to sustain its wealth of natural resources, lock-in resource-efficient and resilient infrastructure, attract investment, and create employment in the increasingly dynamic and competitive sectors of green technology and renewable energy.

    Some key policy recommendations are that these challenges can be met by scaling up existing attempts to strengthen governance and reform countries’ economic structure; mainstreaming green growth into national development plans and government processes; accounting for the essential ecosystem services provided by natural capital, ending open-access natural resource exploitation; and guiding the sustainable growth of cities to ensure well-being and prosperity.

    Click here for more detial.

    Towards Green Growth In Southeast Asia.pdf (2 MB)
  • November 07, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    Climate Risk Management in ADB Projects

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    This ADB report features how ADB applies climate risk management approach to investment projects in Asia and the Pacific, which aims to reduce risks resulting from climate change.

    climate​-risk​-management​-adb​-projects.pdf (3 MB)
  • November 01, 2014
    EcoAgriculture Partners

    A Landscape Perspective on Monitoring & Evaluation for Sustainable Land Management

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    This manual will aid trainers of sustainable land management (SLM) professionals to organize and conduct effective courses on monitoring and evaluation (M&E) from an integrated landscape management perspective.

  • August 08, 2014

    Green Freight and Logistics in Asia: Delivering the Goods, Protecting the Environment

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    This ADB publication features the outcomes of a workshop on Green Freight and Logistics in Asia, co-organized by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für InternationaleZusammenarbeit (GIZ) from 25-27 June, 2014 in Singapore. The workshop was held to promote peer learning and exchange among key stakeholders active in freight and logistics.

    Workshop proceeding ​- Green Freight and Logistics in Asia Final.pdf (5 MB)
  • August 01, 2014
    UNEP

    Towards a Global Map of Natural Capital - Key Ecosystem Assets

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    This report combines information about key ecosystem assets into global maps covering terrestrial and marine realms. The assets included are freshwater resources, soil quality, organic carbon, terrestrial and marine biodiversity, and global fish catch (as a proxy for marine fish stocks). The report builds on a considerable body of work in the fields of natural capital accounting and the mapping of ecosystem services.

    Towards a Global Map of Natural Capital ​- Key Ecosystem Assets.pdf (6 MB)
  • June 24, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB Environmental Issues, Climate Changes, and Energy Security in Developing Asia

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    This paper examines four environmental dimensions of energy security—climate change, air pollution, water availability and quality, and land-use change—and the environmental impact of various energy systems. Since all energy sources have an environmental impact, policymakers must begin to incorporate the cost of these negative consequences into energy prices.

    Environmental Issues, Climate Changes, and Energy Security in Developing Asia.pdf (208 KB)
  • June 15, 2014
    Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI)

    Climate Risks, Regional Integration, and Sustainability in the Mekong Region

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    The Mekong region is not only rich in natural biodiversity and culturally diverse but also has one of the fastest growing regional economies in the world. Returns from economic growth have raised incomes and improved people’s well-being, but many social and economic challenges remain. It has proven difficult to effectively integrate social, economic, and environmental objectives in pursuing sustainability in the region. Rapid change and the regional interdependence across the Mekong countries and China’s Yunnan province has diverse consequences (SEI 2009). Looking back, there is both credit and blame; looking forward, both opportunities and threats.

    sumernet​_book​_climate​_risks​_regional​_integration​_sustainability​_mekong​_region.pdf (2 MB)
  • June 11, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB Clean Energy Investments Project Summaries

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    This report summarizes the investments in clean energy made by the operations departments of the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in 2013, condensing information from project databases and formal reports in an easy-to-reference format. This report was prepared by ADB’s Clean Energy Program which provides the cohesive agenda that encompasses and guides ADB’s lending and non-lending assistance, initiatives, and plan of action for sustainable growth in Asia and the Pacific.

    clean​-energy​-investment​-2014​_1.pdf (6 MB)
  • June 01, 2014
    ICEM

    Natural Systems and Climate Change Resilience in the Lower Mekong Basin

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    This report draws from the past decade of climate change and natural systems work in the Mekong region to summarise findings and lessons for small holder farms and landscape management.

    Click here for more detail.

    LMB Natural Systems Brief JCR final 24 March.pdf (2 MB)
  • May 29, 2014
    GMS Core Environment Program

    Climate Change and Rural Communities in the Greater Mekong Subregion: A Framework for Assessing Vulnerability and Adaptation Options

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    This report presents the methodology and lessons from a climate change adaptation study conducted by the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) Core Environment Program. The study yielded a framework and methodology for assessing climate vulnerability and adaptation options for rural communities in the GMS. It was conducted in biodiversity conservation corridors in Lao People's Democratic Republic, Thailand, and Viet Nam during 2011–2012. The report introduces the framework, describes how it was applied, major results, and makes recommendations for future improvement.

    Climate Change and Rural Communities in the GMS ​- A Framework for Assessing Vulnerability & Adaptation Options.pdf (3 MB)
  • May 28, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB and Climate Investment Funds: Innovation and Action on Climate Change in Asia and the Pacific

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    This document presents ADB’s experience in the development of CIF programs and highlights some of the innovative transformations anticipated or already achieved by ADB projects using CIF funding. In particular, this overview of ADB and CIF activities in the region shows that ADB continues to be committed to building the capacity of its DMCs to address climate change issues by delivering not only finance but also critical knowledge and technology, and by leveraging additional finance, particularly from the private sector.

    ADB​-climate​-investment​-funds​-2014.pdf (5 MB)
  • May 21, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    The Environments of the Poor in Southeast Asia, East Asia and the Pacific

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    This book is first in a series of a three-volume publication on the environments of the poor, and contains selected papers on Southeast Asia, East Asia, and the Pacific from a conference organized in 2010 by ADB, in cooperation with various development partners and think tank institutes in Asia. The book introduces a spatial approach to poverty, and argues that a triple win -- reducing poverty, protecting the environment, and responding to climate change -- is possible.

    environments​-poor​-southeast​-asia.pdf (3 MB)
  • April 25, 2014
    SANDEE

    Policy Brief: Operationalizing Environmental Economic National Accounts

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    This brief draws on the findings and key discussions from the 'Workshop on Valuing and Accounting for the Environment in Asia,' which was held in Bangkok 8-10 October, 2013. The brief was compiled by the South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics (SANDEE). The Core Environment Program provided funding support for the workshop.

    Operationalizing Environmental .pdf (383 KB)
  • April 15, 2014
    Asian Development Bank

    Assessing Impact in the Greater Mekong Subregion: An Analysis of Regional Cooperation Projects

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    This ADB report provides a recent major initiative to assess the initial impact of ADB-supported projects under the Greater Mekong Subregion Program. As part of this exercise, a range of representative projects in the road transport, health, tourism, and energy sectors were selected for detailed analysis, and research institutes working with international consultants assessed their socioeconomic impact.

    ADB​-Assessing​-Impact​-GMS.pdf (2 MB)
  • January 24, 2014
    UNEP

    Building Natural Capital: How REDD+ Can Support A Green Economy

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    REDD+ is the approach adopted by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from forests. REDD+ stands for reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries, plus conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (UNFCCC, 2010). If systematically pursued, REDD+ would bring new momentum and new funding to the task of preserving the world’s forests. REDD+ is already delivering important outcomes as it brings further world attention to the conservation of tropical forests, monitoring the state of forests, and the contributions of people living in and around forests.

    building​_natural​_capital​_full​_report​_english.pdf (18 MB)
  • January 24, 2014
    UNEP

    ASSESSING GLOBAL LAND USE: Balancing Consumption With Sustainable Supply

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    Global cropland is expanding. Changing trends in both the production and consumption of land-based products are increasing pressure on land resources across the globe. This report discusses the need and options to balance consumption with sustainable production. It focuses on land-based products (food, fuels and fibre) and describes methods which enable countries to determine whether their consumption levels exceed sustainable supply capacities. Strategies and measures are outlined which will allow adjusting the policy framework to balance consumption with these capacities.

    full​_report​-assessing​_global​_land​_useenglish​_pdf.pdf (5 MB)
  • December 01, 2013
    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung

    Green Growth Strategies in Asia: Drivers and Political Entry Points

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    Green Growth Strategies in Asia - Drivers and Political Entry Points:

    -Despite their relatively poor environmental performance in recent decades, manyAsian countries are beginning to develop green growth strategies.

    -These strategies utilize different entry points for promoting continued economicgrowth and employment generation, while improving living conditions and addressingthe imperatives of resource efficiency and environmental protection.

    The incentives and drivers vary across countries and depend on the respective developmentmodels, resource endowments, financial resources and technological capacities.

    -Success depends crucially on the development of a new, broader set of state capacities.These include not only capacities to develop and consistently enforce a robustset of environmental policies, but also to ensure their coherence with other policydomains, in particular innovation and industrial policies.

    -In order to scale-up these emerging initiatives into broader transition strategies,the development and further strengthening of corresponding political discoursesand societal coalitions is needed. Such strategies will have to consider the politicaleconomy of reforms, incorporate questions of social justice and address the interestsof key stakeholders.

    Green Growth Strategies in Asia.pdf (217 KB)
  • November 28, 2013
    GMS Core Environment Program

    Planning Sustainable Investments in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This CEP brief summarizes the methodology and lessons learned from a Spatial Multicriteria Assessment (SMCA) recently applied to the GMS Regional Investment Framework. It concludes that SMCA is a valuable tool to help decision makers understand and respond to the economic, environmental, and social risks of investments.  For example, SMCA can assist decision-makers to prioritize investments, determine appropriate land allocation, and plan mitigation measures.

    Planning Sustainable Investments in the GMS​_web.pdf (1 MB)
  • November 20, 2013
    WWF

    Heart of Borneo: Investing in Nature for a Green Economy

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    Until now we have put almost no effort in calculating the value of the Borneo forests. It takes the first steps towards quantifying the unseen value of nature in the Heart of Borneo and tells us that with concerted action, a green development pathway is indeed possible, with greater benefits for everybody, including indigenous communities and the poor. It presents a beacon of hope, with conservation, development and economic growth going hand in hand.  In order to implement its message, the real value of natural capital must be reflected in btoh fiscal planning and the prices of goods and services. There must be financial incentives to stimulate the proper husbandry of natural resources, with realistic valuations given to the crucial issue of the growth of low-carbon markets and sustainable, pro-poor economies. Carbon finance through REDD+ can be a key mechanism to safeguard the forests and unlock their true value.  Governments must take the lead and work with civil society, indigenous groups and the private sector to make sustainable forest management financially worthwhile. The Heart of Borneo is an excellent place to begin. We urgently need a new path towards a sustainable future-one which places a true economic value on nature's gifts and the role they play in providing us with the necessities of life. 
     This report will help us to get closer to creating the green economies that will ensure food, water and energy security for all.

    heart​_of​_borneo​_green​_economy​_main​_report​_2012.pdf (15 MB)
  • November 01, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    Energy Outlook for Asia and the Pacific

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    This ADB book provides an energy outlook for the region up to the year 2035 to help identify policy, social, infrastructure, and technology issues that must be addressed to meet future energy needs of ADB members in Asia and the Pacific. 

    ADB energy outlook in Asia.pdf (2 MB)
  • October 14, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB Environment Operational Directions 2013 – 2020

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    In the context of Strategy 2020 and in the follow-up to the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), this ADB report provides a coherent overview of ADB environment operations and to articulate how it will step up efforts to help the region achieve a transition to environmentally sustainable growth or green growth. Building on ADB sector and thematic plans, this paper includes a brief review of recent ADB experience in environment operations, and identifies effective approaches for the development of “greener” country partnership strategies, investment projects, and associated knowledge and technical assistance activities. 

    ADB Environment Operational Directions 2013​-2020 ​- Green Growth.pdf (911 KB)
  • September 05, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    Prospects for Carbon Capture and Storage in Southeast Asia

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    This ADB report was produced under the Technical Assistance Grant: Determining the Potential for Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Southeast Asia (TA 7575-REG), and is focused on an assessment of the CCS potential in Thailand, Viet Nam, and specific regions of Indonesia (South Sumatra) and the Philippines (Calabarzon).

    ADB Carbon Capture Storage Southeast Asia 2013.pdf (3 MB)
  • July 01, 2013
    AfDB, OECD, UN and WB

    A Toolkit of Policy Options to Support Inclusive Green Growth

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    The non-prescriptive Inclusive Green Growth Toolkit developed by four International Organizations (IOs) - AfDB, OECD, UN, and WB - at the request of the G20 Development Working Group under the Mexican G20 Presidency in June 2012 and updated in July 2013 aims at providing policy-makers with:

    · A framework to help develop inclusive green growth strategies

    · An overview of some of the key tools that specifically address the challenges raised by making growth green and inclusive.

    · A brief discussion of knowledge sharing and capacity building challenges and solutions.

    The tools described in the toolkit are mostly classic, fairly well-known tools such as environmental fiscal reform and social protection instruments. What is new is that they are brought together and that they are all being assessed according to their economic, social, and environmental implications.

    IGG​-ToolkitAfDB​-OECD​-UN​-WB​-revised​_July​_2013.pdf (2 MB)
  • April 17, 2013
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB Report on Facilitating Safe Labor Migration in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This report, prepared by the International Organization for Migration and funded by ADB, highlights issues on labor migration in the GMS and offers recommendations toward increasing social protection for migrants, strengthening capacity and legal framework, and enhancing knowledge management mechanisms.

    ADB facilitating safe labor migration in gms.pdf (2 MB)
  • December 12, 2012
    Asian Development Bank

    GMS Atlas of the Environment - 2nd Edition

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    Prepared for the 20th Anniversary of the GMS, this second edition of the Atlas offers a unique overview of the exquisite beauty and diversity of the subregion’s natural environment. It also highlights the tremendous progress made by the GMS countries, as well as the need to address the increasing risks that they face. 


    Access the Atlas here.

  • September 14, 2012
    Asian Development Bank

    GMS: 20 Years of Partnership

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    This collection of images illustrates the progress and challenges of 20 years of work in the Greater Mekong Subregion. It makes no attempt to focus solely on the work of the Asian Development Bank, or any one partner. It is a celebration of the work of everyone who has labored to make the Greater Mekong Subregion into what it is today.

    GMS ​- Twenty Years of Partnership.pdf (6 MB)
  • September 01, 2012
    WB

    Strategic Environmental Assessment in the World Bank: Learning from Recent Experience and Challenges

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    This report presents the results of a review of the World Bank's strategic environmental assessment (SEA) experience undertaken by the World Bank learning community the SEA Community of Practice (SEACoP). The review included regional reviews that analyzed the World Bank's SEA experience for all regions in which the Bank is operating. These reviews were complemented by the production of a synthesis and conclusion chapter to draw lessons and good SEA practices. The review has been a vehicle for environmental assessment and sector specialists to dialogue about SEA practice in the World Bank. Ultimately, the review is an attempt to launch a process of continuous learning in order to strengthen the World Bank SEA capacity in response to an increasing interest of client countries in upstream environmental and social analytical work. Thus this report is no more than a first step. Its findings and results cannot be treated as conclusive. Rather, they set a baseline upon which new and complementary learning activities can be undertaken over time.

    728950ESW0whit0200ENV0SEA0pub0final.pdf (4 MB)
  • August 21, 2012
    Asian Development Bank

    Agricultural Trade Facilitation in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    This ADB publication focuses on agriculture trade facilitation plan which lays out systematic ways to increase movement and flow of agri-food products and their impacts on the Greater Mekong Subregion sector.

    ADB agricultural​-trade​-facilitation​-gms.pdf (717 KB)
  • June 15, 2012
    IUCN

    Situation Analysis on Climate Change

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    Bangladesh and India share three major river systems: the Ganga, the Brahmaputra and the Meghna. Along with their tributaries, these rivers drain about 1.75 million sq km of land, with an average runoff of 1,200 cu km. The GBM system also supports over 620 million people. Thus, the need for cooperation on trans-boundary waters is crucial to the future well-being of these millions.

    Situation Analysis on Climate Change​_2012​_IUCN.pdf (2 MB)
  • June 01, 2012
    UNEP

    Promoting Upstream-downstream Linkages Through Integrated Ecosystem Management in the Greater Mekong Subregion (UNEP Policy Series)

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    In the context of supporting biodiversity conservation, sustainable development, and poverty reduction, this policy paper portrays the critical role that ecosystem management and ecosystem services can play in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS). Ecosystem management is"an integrated process to conserve and improve ecosystem health that sustains ecosystem services for human well-being" (UNEP, 2009). The IUCN defines it as "a process that integrates ecological, socio-economic, and institutional factors into comprehensive analysis and action in order to sustain and enhance the quality of the ecosystems to meet current and future needs" (IUCN, 2011). Ecosystem management embraces an interdisciplinary approach that highlights connections between ecological, social-cultural, economic and institutional structures. Underlying the approach is the explicit goal to sustain ecosystem composition, structure, and function while providing for human needs (Grumbine, 1994, Layzer, 2008). Critical to this is ongoing research and monitoring of ecological interactions and processes, and a collaborative, adaptive approach.

    PB12252.pdf (5 MB)
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Environment Projects in GMS Landscapes

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GMS Agriculture

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GMS Airports

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GMS Conservation Landscapes

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GMS Crossborder Power Transmission

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GMS Dams

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GMS Ecoregions

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GMS Ethnic Groups

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GMS Forest 2009

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GMS Population 2010

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GMS Population 2014

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GMS Protected Areas

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GMS Railways

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GMS Rice Production

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GMS River Basins

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GMS Sea Ports

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GMS Soil Types

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GMS Special Economic Zones (CEZ)

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GMS Topography

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GMS Tourism Top Sites

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GMS Transport Corridor