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  • July 17, 2016
    UNEP

    Food Systems and Natural Resources

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    Food systems are at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a historic global commitment to eradicate poverty and hunger while ensuring healthy, prosperous and fulfilling lives. The food we grow, produce, consume, trade, transport, store and sell is the essential connecting thread between people, prosperity, and planet. We therefore need ‘resource-smart’ food systems. Food systems crucially depend on natural resources: land, soil, water, terrestrial and marine biodiversity, minerals (essential nutrients for crops and animals) and fossil fuels. The use of these natural resources goes beyond primary food production, e.g. fresh water for processing and biomass for packaging or cooking. If we want ensure all people have safe and nutritious food, in appropriate amounts, these natural resources need to be managed sustainably and used efficiently, while reducing environmental impacts. The food sector is globally the dominant user of a number of natural resources, particularly land, biodiversity, fresh water, nitrogen and phosphorus. Food systems, and food production in particular, are also a major driver of a number of environmental impacts, such as the loss of biodiversity, soil degradation, water depletion and greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, the people who directly or indirectly manage our food systems are also the largest group of natural resource managers in the world and could become critical agents of change in the transformation of current consumption and production systems.

    ​-Food​_systems​_and​_natural​_resources​-2016Food​_Systems​_and​_Natural​_Resources.pdf.pdf (9 MB)
  • July 15, 2016
    Asian Development Bank

    ADB - Natural Capital and the Rule of Law: Proceedings of the ADB Second Asian Judges Symposium on Environment 2013

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    This publication captures the proceedings of the Second Asian Judges Symposium: "Natural Capital and the Rule of Law" held 3–5 December 2013 in Manila, the Philippines.

     

    natural​-capital​-and​-rule​-law.pdf (2 MB)
  • July 01, 2016
    Climate Focus

    Fostering Climate Action through Trade-Related Policy Instruments Final report: Delivery strategies and support tools

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  • July 01, 2016
    MoE - Government of Cambodia

    Understanding Public Perceptions of Climate Change in Cambodia

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    This Ministry of Environment report presents results from a study that identified and evaluated changes in knowledge, attitudes and practices of the public relating to climate change.

    Understanding Public Perceptions to Climate Change in Cambodia.pdf (9 MB)
  • July 01, 2016
    UNEP

    Unlocking the Sustainable Potential Of Land Resources Evaluation Systems, Strategies and Tools

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    This report provides an introduction to land evaluation systems, strategies and tools necessary for “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” The text focuses strongly on how to better match land use with its sustainable potential, in order to reduce the amount of land required to meet human needs, minimize land degradation, and cost-effectively restore already degraded lands. The report provides information that private landowners can use to increase long-term productivity and profitability, while at the same time addressing global objectives defined through land-related Sustainable Development Goals, and particularly 15.3 (land degradation neutrality).

    land​_resources​_full​_report​_english.pdf (3 MB)
  • June 17, 2016
    Ke Ai Advancing Research Evolving Science

    Approaches to low carbon development in China and India

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    Low carbon development has gained policy prominence and is a concern of both environment and development policy globally and in China and India. This paper discusses the role of China and India as important global actors in light of development imperatives in the two countries. The article then looks at emerging approaches in the two countries related to financing, science, technology & innovation policy, and sub-national actions. The objective is to review efforts in China and India for contributing to learning experiences for other countries. The final section discussed the ways forward in terms of examining the role of China and India in terms of national policy strengthening as well as in global agenda setting. Implementation of sub-national initiatives in both countries faces challenges due to lack of adequate financing as well as knowledge such as greenhouse gas inventories and disaggregated resource and socio-economic assessments. Both India and China are making efforts in technology and innovation domains to set foot on a trajectory of low carbon development with varying degrees of success. In finance, both China and India have experimented with various instruments—the key difference is that China has taken the support of regulation more while India has leaned on to market based instruments. Both China and India are moving on an encouraging track regarding low carbon development with fairly well-designed domestic policies and consistent international engagement.

    1​-s2.0​-S167492781630034X​-main.pdf (300 KB)
  • June 15, 2016
    ADB

    ADB - Urban Development in the Greater Mekong Subregion

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    Urbanization is set to play an ever greater role in the development of the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) countries, transforming their economies and providing support to green economic growth.

    Follow the link for more detial.

  • June 15, 2016
    ESCAP, IOM, ILO, OCHA, UN Women, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNFPA, UNHCR, UN-ACI, UNICEF, UNODC, WHO, World Bank

    Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015

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    The Asia-Pacific Migration Report 2015: Migrants' Contributions to Development, produced by the Asia-Pacific Regional Thematic Working Group on International Migration, including Human Trafficking, provides an insight into how labour migration, the dominant migration trend in the Asia-Pacific region, can contribute to development in countries of origin and destination in the Asia-Pacific region. It reviews the main migration trends in the Asia-Pacific region; considers how migrants impact on GDP growth, employment, and wages in countries of destination; and considers how the positive impacts of migration can be maximized, while minimizing the negative trends. In general, it finds that migration is a benefit to countries of origin, destination, and migrants themselves; however, further contributions are hampered by the vulnerability of migrant workers to exploitation. It calls for migration policies and forms of international cooperation that are harmonized with development priorities and international human rights and labour standards to ensure that migration is a benefit for all.

    SDD AP Migration Report report v6​-1​-E.pdf (5 MB)
  • June 15, 2016
    WCS Cambodia

    Carbofuran poisoning at the interface between wildlife, livestock and humans.

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    Between January and August 2015, a series of animal mortality and human morbidity events in PreahVihear Province, were detected by the LACANET wildlife disease surveillance network. Initial findingsraised suspicions towards a link to pesticide use. Given the morbidity and mortality risks for humans,livestock, and endangered species, a thorough investigation was initiated. This document reports theresults of this investigation.

    This report was produced by the Wildlife Conservation Society with contribution from Dr MathieuPruvot (WCS), Alistair Mould (WCS), and Dr Mei Castor (US-CDC). Follow the link for more detial about WCS Cambodia.

    Carbofuran poisoning at the interface between wildlife, livestock and humans, June 2016.pdf (730 KB)